GERMAN & EUROPEAN STUDIES IN THE U.S.
Changing World, Shifting Narratives
University of Massachusetts Amherst
NEH SUMMER INSTITUTE
6 July – 2 August 2005

Syllabus

*note: Unless noted otherwise, readings are part of the books or readers that will be sent to you. Some readings could not be included in the readers for copyright reasons. These will be on ereserve and/or print reserve. For instructions on using ereserves, please see the enclosed handout.

A print reserve will be available at the Nielsen Library at Smith; see attached handout.

*subject to change. Please check updated program at: http://www.umass.edu/germanic/neh2005 .

Week 1 : Transatlantic Agendas in Contemporary History and a "New European Historiography"

Week 2: Film and History / Film as History / Film History

Week 3 : Issues in Feminism and German Studies

Week 4 : A Multicultural Germany in a Globalizing World? The Case of Black Germans

Week 5 : Academic Work in a Changing World

WEEK IV (July 25-29, 2005)

A Multicultural Germany in a Globalizing World? The Case of Black Germans

Facilitator: Sara Lennox

In cooperation with members of the Black European Studies Project and of the Black German Studies Project: Fatima El-Tayeb, Tobias Nagl, Randolf Ochsmann, Peggy Piesche

Monday July 25

Colonialism and Race

9 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Neilson Browsing Room

 

Keynote Lecture (Tina Campt):

Be Real Black for Me: Black Germans and African Diaspora in Europe.

 

Reading :

Fatima El-Tayeb.  “'We are Germans, We are Whites, and We Want to Stay White!' Whiteness and German National Identity 1900/2000.” Colors 1800/1900/2000 .  Eds. Birgit Tautz. Amsterdam : Rodopi, 2002.  185-205.

 

Lora Wildenthal. "Race, Gender, and Citizenship in the German Colonial Empire." Eds. Frederick Cooper and Ann Laura Stoler. Tensions of Empire. Colonial Cultures in a Bourgeois World . Berkeley : University of California Press, 1997. 263-283. Ereserves

 

Pascal Grosse.  "Turning Native?  Anthropology, German Colonialism, and the Paradoxes of the 'Acclimatization Question,' 1885-1914."   Worldly Provincialism: German Anthropology in the Age of Empire. Eds. H. Glenn Penny and Matti Bunzl.  Ann Arbor :   University of Michigan Press, 2003. 179-197.

 

Sara Friedrichsmeyer, Sara Lennox, and Susanne Zantop. Introduction.  The Imperialist Imagination:  German Colonialism and Its Legacy . Eds. Sara Friedrichsmeyer, Sara Lennox, and Susanne Zantop. Ann Arbor : University of Michigan Press, 1998.  1- 32. Ereserves

7:30 p.m.

Film Screening: 7:30 p.m. Weinstein Auditorium, Wright Hall.

Short Film.

Germanin – Die Geschichte einer kolonialen Tat . Max von Kimmich, Germany, 1943. German language - No subtitles . VHS. 94 minutes.

 

Background Reading for Film :

Sabine Hake.  “Mapping the Native Body:  On Africa and the Colonial Film in the Third Reich.”  The Imperialist Imagination:  German Colonialism and Its Legacy. Ed. Sara Friedrichsmeyer, Sara Lennox, and Susanne Zantop.Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1998.  163-187. Ereserves

 

Tobias Nagl.  „Louis Brody and the Black Presence in German Film Before 1945.” Not So Plain as Black and White: Afro-German Culture and History, 1890-2000. Ed. Patricia Mazon and Reinhild Steingrover.  Rochester , NY :   University of Rochester Press, 2005. 109-135. Ereserves

Tuesday July 26

Black Germans in the Weimar Republic and National
Socialism 

9 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Neilson Browsing Room

 

Discussion.

 

Reading:

Tina Campt, Pascal Grosse, and Yara-Colette Lemke-Muniz de Faria. "Blacks, Germans, and The Politics of Imperialist Imagination, 1920 -1960."  The Imperialist Imagination:  German Colonialism and Its Legacy .  Eds. Sara Friedrichsmeyer, Sara Lennox, and Susanne Zantop.   Ann Arbor :   University of Michigan Press, 1998.  205-229.  

 

Doris Reiprich and Erika Ngambi Ul Kuo.   “Our Father was Cameroonian, Our Mother, East Prussian, We are Mulattoes.”   Showing Our Colors:  Afro-German Women Speak Out .  Ed. May Opitz, Katharina Oguntoye, and Dagmar Schultz. Trans. Anne V. Adams .   Amherst :   University of Massachusetts Press, 1992. 56-76.   Ereserves

Tina Campt. “Conversations with the ‘Other Within'. Memories of a Black German Coming of Age in the Third Reich.” Other Germans: Black Germans and the Politics of Race, Gender, and Memory in the Third Reich .   Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2003.  91 – 134.  

Recommended Reading :

Tobias Nagl. “'Die Wacht am Rhein.' Rasse und Rassimus in der Filmpropaganda gegen die ‘schwarze Schmach' 1920 – 1923.“ Kultur Macht Politik. Perspective einer kritischen Wissenschaft . Eds. Hella Hertzfeldt and Katrin Schäfgen. Berlin : Dietz, 2004. 135 – 154. Ereserves

2:30 p.m.

Film Screening: Academy of Music

Nobi. GDR. Günter Rätz, 1963. Animation. 35 minutes. 35 mm.

The Scout. GDR, Konrad Petzold, 1983. 102 minutes. 35 mm.

 

Background Reading for Film :

Peggy Piesche.  “Das Schwarze als Maske. Images des ‘Fremden' in DEFA-Filmen.   Informationszentrum Dritte Welt.  276 (April/May 2004): 39 – 41.

Wednesday July 27

Black Germans in the Postwar Period in the FRG and GDR

9 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Neilson Browsing Room

 

Discussion.

 

Reading:

Heide Fehrenbach.  “Rehabilitating Fatherland: Race and German Remasculinization.” Signs 24.1 (Autumn 1998): 107-128.  

Peggy Piesche. “Black and German?  East German Adolescents Before 1989:  A Retrospective View of a “Non-Existent Issue” in the GDR.”   The Cultural After-Life of East Germany :  New Transnational Perspectives.   Ed. Leslie A. Adelson.   Washington , DC :  AICGS:  2002.  37-59.  
http://www.aicgs.org/Publications/PDF/volume13.pdf

Selections from Ika Hügel-Mashall .  Invisible Woman:  Growing Up Black in Germany . Trans. Elizabeth Gaffney.   New York :  Continuum, 2001.  17 – 33 (reader). 35 – 44 ( Ereserves ) .
 

Yara-Colette Lemke-Muniz de Faria.   " Germany 's 'Brown Babies" Must be Helped! Will You?   U.S. Adoption Plans for Afro-German Children, 1950-1955." Callaloo . 26.2 (2003): 342-362.

3 p.m.

Film Screening: The Academy of Music .

Toxi . FRG, Robert Stemmle, 1952. 88 minutes. 35 mm.

Thursday July 28

Can the Subaltern Speak German?   Black German Self-Representation and Political Organization

9 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Neilson Browsing Room

 

Discussion.

 

Reading:

Fatima El-Tayeb.  "'If You Cannot Pronounce My Name, You Can Just Call Me Pride'. Afro-German Activism, Gender, and Hip Hop." Gender & History 15.3 (November 2003): 460 – 487.

 

May Ayim.   “Afro-deutsch I” and “Afro-deutsch II.” Blues in Schwarz Weiss:  Gedichte . Berlin:  Orlanda Frauenverlag, 1995.  ( Ereserves )

 

Kofi Yapko.  "Love of Convenience."   May Ayim Award.  Erster internationaler schwarzer deutscher Literaturpreis 2004.   Berlin :  Orlanda, 2004.  29 - 36.

Olumide Popoola.  "This is Not About Sadness" and "Undercurrents." May Ayim Award.  Erster internationaler schwarzer deutscher Literaturpreis 2004.   Berlin :  Orlanda, 2004.  41 - 43 and 66-68.

Ika Hügel. „Wir brauchen uns – und unsere Unterschiede!“ Entfernte Verbindungen. Rassismus Antisemitismus Klassenunterdrückung. Eds. Ika Hügel et. al. Berlin: Orlanda, 1993. 18 – 33.

Nicola Lauré Al-Samurai   “Neither Foreigner nor Alien:” Women in German Yearbook 20 (2004).  Ed. Ruth-Ellen Boetcher Joeres and Marjorie Gelus. Lincoln :   University of Nebraska Press, 2004.  163-183. Ereserves

 

Protests of Augsburg Zoo Exhibit.

7:30 p.m.

Film Screening: Weinstein Auditorium, Wright Hall.

Everything Will Be Fine. Fatima El-Tayeb and Angelina Maccarone, FRG 1998. 88 minutes. DVD.

Friday July 29

History & Memory. Writing the Black German Experience.

9 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Neilson Browsing Room

 

Discussion

 

Reading:

Nicola Lauré Al-Samurai. “Inspirited Topography: Über/Lebensräume, Heim-Suchungen und die Verortung der Erfahrung in Schwarzen deutschen Kultur- und Wissenstraditionen.“ Unpublished Manuscript.  

1:30 p.m.

Neilson Browsing Room

 

Panel Discussion (Sabine Bröck, Maria Diedrich, Tracy Sharpley-Whiting):

African-American and Diaspora Studies in Europe

6:00 p.m.

Picnic outside of Lamont Dining Hall