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French and Francophone Studies, Deparment of Languages, Literatures and Cultures

Courses

Undergraduate Courses

Course Descriptions for the Fall 2016 semester

For more details on courses please contact the professor of the course.

FREN 110 – ELEMENTARY FRENCH I 3 credits

An introduction to French with an emphasis on acquiring a basic level of proficiency in the language and an understanding of France and the Francophone world. Speaking French from day one, students practice the language through listening comprehension/speaking activities, vocabulary and grammar exercises, meaningful readings, video segments, and Web activities devoted to French and Francophone language and culture. Texts: Voilà! (textbook/two audio CDs, 6th edition), Heilenman, Kaplan, and Toussaint Tournier (Cengage Publishers) and the I-Learn electronic workbook which accompanies the 6th edition of Voilà!.

Requirements: daily presence and participation, tests, compositions, and a final exam during the final exam period.

FREN 120 – ELEMENTARY FRENCH II 3 credits

A second-semester elementary French course: a continuation of FREN 110 with emphasis on acquiring basic level of proficiency in the language and understanding of the culture of France and the Francophone world. Speaking French from day one, students practice the language through listening comprehension/speaking activities, vocabulary and grammar exercises, meaningful readings, video segments, and Web activities devoted to French and Francophone language and culture. Texts: Voilà! (textbook/two audio CDs, 6th edition, Heilenman, Kaplan, and Toussaint Tournier (Cengage Publishers), and the I-Learn electronic workbook which accompanies the 6th edition of Voilà!.

Requirements: daily presence and participation, tests, compositions, and a final exam during the final exam period.

 FREN 230 - INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I 3 credits

Course taught in French. Students review grammar points learned in elementary French and study more complex grammatical structures. The course is designed to improve: (1) listening comprehension, through class lecture and discussion; (2) speaking proficiency, through exercises on vocabulary and pronunciation; (3) reading comprehension, through analysis of cultural readings; and (4) writing ability, through frequent assignments.

Prerequisite: FREN 120, 126, or 2-3 years of high school French.

FREN 240 – Intermediate French II: Four Skills 3 credits

Course taught in French. Practice with the four skills: reading, writing, understanding, and speaking. Readings of contemporary literary texts. Review of grammar as questions arise. Requirements: compositions, quizzes, midterm and final. Prerequisite: FREN 230 or equivalent. Suitable for students who plan to continue beyond the 240 level. This course completes the CHFA Language Requirement.     

FREN 285 – LANGUAGE SUITE CONVERSATION, 2 credits 

Thatcher House, By Arrangement

Course taught in French. Designed as part of the living-learning community in Thatcher Language House. Improves knowledge of the French language with emphasis on oral skills. Builds vocabulary, develops ability to understand and communicate more freely in the language by focusing on social and cultural issues. HONORS COLLOQUIM (FREN 285ISH) available.

FREN 290L-ST-AMERICANS IN PARIS  3 credits Prof. Kathryn Lachman

 "We'll always have Paris," a famous line from the 1942 classic film Casablanca, captures the special relationship between Americans and the city of light throughout the course of the 20th century. In this interdisciplinary course, students will explore the influence of Paris on American writers, artists, musicians, scientists, and other cultural figures. We begin in the 1920s with the first generation of American expatriate artists who made their home in Paris, a group that includes writers Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Edith Wharton, and Gertrude Stein; iconic dancers Isadora Duncan and Josephine Baker; photographer Man Ray; and musicians George Gershwin and Sidney Bechet. Our focus then shifts to the post-war generation of African American writers such as Richard Wright and James Baldwin; to the culinary influence of Paris on star chef personalities such as Julia Child, and to important scientific collaborations such as the simultaneous discovery of the HIV virus by French and American scientists. Finally, we will read and evaluate popular contemporary works by Americans in Paris, including the celebrated New Yorker columnist Adam Gopnik (author of From Paris to the Moon) and Pamela Druckerman (author of Bringing up Bébé). How did Paris---and the broader experience of exile---impact these American's national, ethnic, sexual, and artistic identities? Course requirements include active class participation, an oral presentation, two essays, a midterm, and a final.

FREN 303- WRITING ON LANGUAGE 3 credits Prof. Luke Bouvier

An intensive English writing course that fulfills the Junior Year Writing requirement and enhances the ability to write about literature and culture in a critical manner. Students will develop and refine their skills in writing and analysis while encountering a variety of French and Francophone texts. Specific topics will vary and may focus on a particular movement, author or theme. Coursework includes discussion, frequent writing assignments of varying lengths, CV workshop, peer critiques and tutorial-style meetings. Prerequisite: successful completion of the College Writing requirement (or exemption from the requirement).

FREN 350 – FRENCH FILM  3 credits  Prof. Kathryn Lachman

General Education course taught entirely in English, and all films have English subtitles.  This semester's focus is on contemporary French and Francophone films.  Using the background you acquire from the assigned readings, papers, lectures, screenings, and meetings of your discussion section, you will learn how to do a critical film analysis.  We will explore recent debates about French identity in light of the challenges posed by immigration (especially non-European immigration), feminism, economic and cultural globalization, and France's version of ?multiculturalism," casting a wide net over cinema to examine the privileged relationship between a nation, an art, and a social practice.

FREN 371 – ADVANCED GRAMMAR  3 credits Prof. Luke Bouvier/ Eva Valenta

Course taught in French.

The first of two consecutive courses devoted to advanced grammar review and composition (followed by French 473). Extensive written practice with various grammatical structures, frequent short writing assignments, introduction to literary analysis

FREN 384- THEMES IN FRENCH LIT & INTELLECTUAL HISTORY 3 credits Prof. Eva Valenta

Course taught in French.  Major contributions of French writers over the centuries to an exploration of the human condition. Focus on various aspects of the relations between such intellectual inquiry and the evolution of literary forms and genres.

FREN 424-RENAISSANCE PROSE 3 credits Prof. Philippe Baillargeon

Course taught in French. The purpose of this course is to acquaint the participants with some works of late-medieval and Renaissance storytellers (French "conteurs"). We will read a variety of texts in the storytelling tradition, from /Les Cent Nouvelles Nouvelles/ to Beroalde de Verville's /Le Moyen de parvenir/. We will place emphasis on genre definition, narratology, aesthetics and cultural history. Among the problems we will discuss together are the following: the relationship between ideology (courtly love, feudalism, humanism, evangelism, "Querelle des femmes", etc.) and literature; rhetoric and truth, historicity and exemplarity; imitation; intertextuality; "vraisemblance"; authority, authorship and gendered discourse; exemplarity, self-referentiality and identity. (Gen.Ed. AL)

FREN 444- EIGHTEENTH CENTURY THEATRE & NOVEL 3 credits Prof. Patrick Mensah

 The French Enlightenment involved a critical renewal of European political and philosophical self-understanding through an iconoclastic revision of literary and philosophical representational forms associated with the ancien regime. This ?renewal? entailed a rethinking of the role of reason in political and social life, a re-conception of gender relations, and a redefinition of Europe?s relationship with non-European cultures. We will follow the staging of this triple agenda in the works (novels and plays) of Montesquieu, Beaumarchais, Marivaus, Rousseau, Diderot, Laclos, Prevost, Voltaire, and other luminaries of the Encyclopedie movement.

FREN 473- ADVANCED GRAMMAR & COMPOSITION  3 credits Prof. Dianne Sears

 Taught in French. The second of two consecutive courses devoted to advanced grammar review and composition (following French 371). Extensive written practice with various grammatical structures; frequent short writing assignments; introduction to literary analysis.

Prerequisite: French 371.

 FREN 498Y – Language Suite Conversation, 2 credits 

Thatcher House, By Arrangement

This is a practicum course designed as an apprenticeship for students interested in teaching and mentoring their peers and taking a leadership role in the residential Thatcher House French community. Eligible students must be proficient in French beyond the 300 level, ideally with native or near-native speaking, reading and writing ability. In peer group tutoring sessions, undergraduate TAs help fellow students with various areas including conversation, vocabulary, grammar, literary and cultural assignments. They are also responsible for facilitating joint projects such as the annual Thatcher Conference presentations, Photostory digital narration, cultural events such as the Fête des Crèpes and annual trip to Montreal. Honors Colloquium ( 1 credit) available

We also offer Independent Studies

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