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Academics

Courses in French & Francophone Studies

We offer the courses below on a regular basis, as staffing allows. Check the "Notes" section of each course for the frequency of the course rotation. For course meeting times and locations, please check Spire.

Jump to graduate-level courses


French 110: Elementary French I

An introduction to French with an emphasis on acquiring a basic level of proficiency in the language and an understanding of France and the Francophone world. Speaking French from day one, students practice the language through listening comprehension/speaking activities, vocabulary and grammar exercises, meaningful readings, video segments, and Web activities devoted to French and Francophone language and culture. Texts: Voilà! (textbook/two audio CDs, 6th edition), Heilenman, Kaplan, and Toussaint Tournier (Cengage Publishers) and the I-Learn electronic workbook which accompanies the 6th edition of Voilà!. Requirements: daily presence and participation, tests, compositions, and a final exam during the final exam period.

NOTES: Offered every fall and spring semester, as well as online in Summer Session 1.
PREREQUISITES: None, or UMass French Placement Test score range of 0-20.
CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  Fall 2019 - Rhonda Tarr and staff Spring 2020 - Rhonda Tarr and staff


French 120: Elementary French II

A second-semester elementary French course: a continuation of FREN 110 with emphasis on acquiring basic level of proficiency in the language and understanding of the culture of France and the Francophone world. Speaking French from day one, students practice the language through listening comprehension/speaking activities, vocabulary and grammar exercises, meaningful readings, video segments, and Web activities devoted to French and Francophone language and culture. Texts: Voilà! (textbook/two audio CDs, 6th edition, Heilenman, Kaplan, and Toussaint Tournier (Cengage Publishers), and the I-Learn electronic workbook which accompanies the 6th edition of Voilà!. Requirements: daily presence and participation, tests, compositions, and a final exam during the final exam period.

NOTES: Offered every fall and spring semester, as well as online in Summer Session 2.
PREREQUISITES: French 110 or UMass French Placement Test score range of 21-34.
CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  Fall 2019 - Rhonda Tarr and staff Spring 2020 - Rhonda Tarr and staff


French 126: Elementary Intensive French

An intensive introduction to French with a focus on acquiring language proficiency and an understanding of the culture of France and the Francophone world. This highly intensive and interactive French course is designed for very motivated and disciplined students of French who are committed to attending every class session and practicing outside of class for an absolute minimum of 12 hours per week.

NOTES: Occasionally offered in spring semesters. Covers the material of both French 110 and 120 in one semester.
PREREQUISITES: None, or UMass French Placement Test score range of 0-20.
CREDITS: 6
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  No


French 230: Intermediate French I

Students review grammar points learned in elementary French and study more complex grammatical structures. The course is designed to improve: (1) listening comprehension, through class lecture and discussion; (2) speaking proficiency, through exercises on vocabulary and pronunciation; (3) reading comprehension, through analysis of cultural readings; and (4) writing ability, through frequent assignments.

NOTES: Course taught in French. Offered every fall and spring semester, as well as online in Summer Session 1.
PREREQUISITES: French 120 or 126, or UMass French Placement Test score range of 35-50.
CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  Fall 2019 - Ena Vulor and staff Spring 2020 - Ena Vulor and staff


French 240: Intermediate French II - Four Skills

Practice with the four skills: reading, writing, understanding, and speaking. Readings of contemporary literary texts. Review of grammar as questions arise. Requirements: compositions, quizzes, midterm and final exam.

NOTES: Course taught in French. Offered every fall and spring semester, as well as online in Summer Session 2. Fulfills the CHFA Foreign-Language Proficiency Requirement.
PREREQUISITES: French 230, or UMass French Placement Test score range of 51-65.
CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  Fall 2019 - Ena Vulor and staff Spring 2020 - Ena Vulor and staff


French 246: Intensive Intermediate French - Four Skills

An intensive course in which students review grammar points learned in elementary French and study more complex grammatical structures in conjunction with readings in French and Francophone literature. The course is designed to improve listening comprehension (through class lecture and discussion) and speaking proficiency, (through exercises on vocabulary and pronunciation) but emphasizes reading comprehension (through analysis of literary readings) and writing ability (through frequent compositions). Covers the material of both 230 and 240 in one semester.

NOTES: Course taught in French. Offered infrequently as staffing allows. Fulfills the CHFA Foreign-Language Proficiency Requirement.
PREREQUISITES: French 120 or 126, or UMass French Placement Test score range of 35-50.
CREDITS: 6
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  No


French 250: Language and Literature

The course is designed to introduce students to literary and cultural analysis of short stories, plays, poems, and films, which we study in relationship to their historical, cultural, and political contexts. Relating texts to contemporary culture, we focus on improving students’ reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills in French. Review of grammar as questions arise. Requirements: written exercises, oral presentations, compositions, quizzes, and two hour exams. Active and regular participation in class is required.

NOTES: Course taught in French. Usually offered in the fall semester, and occasionally in the spring semester. Fulfills the CHFA Foreign-Language Proficiency Requirement.
PREREQUISITES: French 240, or UMass French Placement Test score range of 61-70.
CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  Fall 2019 - Staff


French 273: Advanced Conversation

Conversation practice on a large number of topics. Develops ability to use and understand spoken French in a variety of social situations and helps build vocabulary of informal French.

NOTES: Course taught in French. Usually offered every fall and spring semester.
PREREQUISITES: French 240 or 250
CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  Fall 2019 - Staff Spring 2020 - Staff


French 280: Love and Sex in French Literature (GenEd: AL)

Course taught in English. This course offers a broad historical overview of the ways in which love and erotic behavior in French culture have been represented and understood in the arts, especially in Literature and, more recently, in film, from the middle ages to the twentieth century.

NOTES: Course taught in English. Offered every fall semester, as well as online in Summer Session 1.
PREREQUISITES: None
CREDITS: 4
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  Fall 2019 - Patrick Mensah


French 289: Paris Through the Centuries (GenEd: HS)

The aim of this course is to provide an in-depth geographical, historical, and cultural perspective of the city of Paris beginning with the Gallo-Roman period and ending with the Paris of today.  Each lecture will focus on a historical event or trans-historical topic whose origins and unique aspects we learn about through an analysis of cultural, artistic, architectural, cinematographic, and literary references.

NOTES: Course taught in English. Offered every spring semester.
PREREQUISITES: None
CREDITS: 4
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  Spring 2020 - Philippe Baillargeon


French 297U: The Undead Souths: Southern Gothic and Francophone Mythologies

Paying due attention to their affiliations with Francophone and French Creole cultures and mythologies of the Caribbean and the American South, this course will explore representations of the undead, such as zombies, vampires, and related paranormal creatures of the Southern Gothic tradition on film and television. We shall examine popular entertainment media narratives of such paranormal phenomena and related critical scholarship, treating them as figures and tropes of displaced social anxieties and commentaries through which evolving personal, cultural, historical and sociopolitical themes are articulated and negotiated. Themes to be examined would include, the history of slavery, colonial and postcolonial relations, Creolization, religion, cultural difference, globalization, minority relations, civil rights, issues of sexuality, money, class relations, terror, ecological degradation, as well as questions of dystopian, utopian, apocalyptic, and post-apocalyptic narrative interest.

NOTES: Course taught in English. Offered occasionally, generally in the spring semester.
PREREQUISITES: None
CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  Spring 2020 - Patrick Mensah


French 303: Writing on Language: Madame Bovary and Her Readers

An intensive English writing course that fulfills the Junior Year Writing requirement and enhances the ability to write about literature and culture in a critical manner. As our main project in this course, we will undertake a wide-ranging critical reassessment of Flaubert's Madame Bovary, perhaps the most important French novel of the nineteenth century. We will focus on a detailed textual analysis of Flaubert's work, but also on the critical reception of Madame Bovary since its initial publication. In addition to the novel, we will read documents and commentaries related to the trial following its publication, a selection of Flaubert's letters, and a series of short critical works that will include a variety of methodological approaches. Our work in this regard will not only focus on the importance of Madame Bovary but also serve as an introduction to modern critical discourses. Finally, we will also view portions of six film adaptations of Madame Bovary that present radically different interpretations of the novel. Note that readings and class discussion will primarily be in French, while all written work for the course will be in English.

NOTES: Course taught in French, though writing assignments are in English. Usually offered at least once every two years.
PREREQUISITES: French 240 or equivalent, and successful completion of the College Writing requirement (or exemption from the requirement).

CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  No


French 350: French Film (GenEd: AT)

Food matters in many French movies, when it comes to meals or simply cooking culture. Indeed, food speaks about French identity. We will focus on how food and meals reflect economic realities, national obsessions, behavioral conventions, and societal transformations. At the end of this course, which will introduce a variety of French food films of different genres dating from the 1930s to the present, you will be able to analyze films and their different genres as cultural products, identify the values transmitted within these works of art, and critically discuss films with the technical vocabulary of film analysis.

NOTES: Course taught in English. Offered every fall semester.
PREREQUISITES: None
CREDITS: 4
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  Fall 2019 - Emmanuel Buzay


French 353: African Film (GenEd: AT DG)

Histories and development of African Francophone and Caribbean film, from its inception to the present day. The sociocultural, economic, and political forces and imperatives defining its forms and directions. Questions this work raises in film aesthetics and theory as a whole. Screenings and analysis of films by Sembene, Achkar, Kabore, Mweze, Cisse, Drabo, Bekolo, Teno, Peck, Palcy, Lara, Haas, and others.

NOTES: Course taught in English. Offered every spring semester, as well as online in Summer Session 2.
PREREQUISITES: None
CREDITS: 4
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  Spring 2020 - Patrick Mensah


French 371: Advanced Grammar and Composition I

The first of two consecutive courses devoted to advanced grammar review and composition (followed by French 473). Extensive written practice with various grammatical structures, frequent short writing assignments, introduction to literary analysis.

NOTES: Course taught in French. Offered every fall and spring semester.
PREREQUISITES: French 240 with a grade of B+ or higher, or French 250, or UMass French Placement Test score of 66 or higher.
CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  Fall 2019 - Luke Bouvier and Ena Vulor Spring 2020 - Ena Vulor


French 384: Themes in French Intellectual and Literary History

Major contributions of French writers over the centuries to an exploration of the human condition. Focus on various aspects of the relations between such intellectual inquiry and the evolution of literary forms and genres.

NOTES: Course taught in French. Offered every fall semester.
PREREQUISITES: French 371, preferably 473, or permission of instructor.
CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  Fall 2019 - Eva Valenta


French 386: French Civilization: Origins to 1945 (GenEd: HS)

Introduction to the way the French look at their own political, social, and cultural history; a study of some institutions, events, and figures that help understand French people today.

NOTES: Course taught in French. Non-majors may write papers and exams in English. Offered every spring semester.
PREREQUISITES: French 240 or equivalent, preferably 371.
CREDITS: 4
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  Spring 2020 - Philippe Baillargeon


French 388: Francophone Civilization Outside of France

Introduction to culture and political forces that shaped French-speaking regions outside of Europe, and idea of francophonie. Topics may include: history and ideology of French colonialism; cultural, as distinct from political, colonialism; cultural nationalism; bilingualism and its social, cultural, and linguistic consequences.

NOTES: Course taught in French. Non-majors may write in English. Usually offered every 2 to 3 years.
PREREQUISITES: Flexible, consult instructor
CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  Fall 2019 - Patrick Mensah


French 397D: French for Diplomacy and International Relations

Beginning with a brief introduction to the main characteristics of French diplomacy, as well as to the diplomatic network of French-speaking countries, this class will then focus on providing the necessary linguistic skills to meet three main objectives: 1) the ability to give presentations and organize meetings in international organizations and institutions; 2) the knowledge of how to organize activities within a mission, how to interact with others during that mission, and how to write professionally for the purposes of the mission; and 3) the capability to communicate during an international conference (give a presentation, offer the description of a project, participate in a debate). In sum, this course provides students with knowledge of the technical language and discourses of French for diplomacy and international relations, and is of particular interest for students who wish to pursue careers in diplomacy, international relations, journalism, human rights, and hospitality management.

NOTES: Course taught in French. Usually offered every 2 to 3 years.
PREREQUISITES: French 240 or the equivalent

CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  No


French 397F: Introduction to Science Fiction and Fantasy

This course will focus on the main characteristics of French science fiction and fantasy literature in the 20th and 21st centuries through the study of three novels, a short story anthology, and a comic book. The common theme that all these narratives share is how humanity envisions its evolution - as can be seen through the exploration of how Jules Verne, magicians, witches, and dragons fit together in uchronic and steampunk possible worlds. The science fiction texts also address the related themes of the very limits of the differences between men and animals and the posthuman agenda. Finally, based on these narratives, this course will explore the topic of the figure of the resistant hero, as it is culturally marked, and interrogate the epic character of heroism and the transmission of heroic values in French culture.

NOTES: Course taught in French. Usually offered every 2 to 3 years.
PREREQUISITES: French 240 or the equivalent

CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  No


French 397S: The French Short Story

Our objective in this course will be both literary and cultural. Starting with the 19th-century writers Flaubert and Maupassant and continuing with the short prose works of such 20th- and 21st-century authors as Colette, Sartre, Camus, Duras, Thomas, Ernaux, Le Clezio, Gavalda, Saumont and Schmitt, we will examine and discuss the succession and the interplay of major socio-political, intellectual and literary trends and upheavals that transformed French society from the late 19th to the early 21st century. All readings, discussion and papers will be in French.

NOTES: Course taught in French. Usually offered every 2 to 3 years.
PREREQUISITES: French 240, preferably French 371, or permission of instructor.

CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  No


French 397V: Introduction to French and Francophone Video Games

France and Canada are key producers of video games whose content can be played in French, even if their titles are systematically in English. This class is open to all students with the appropriate level of French (those who do not play video games already and those who play them regularly), and will examine the Francophone cultural components of the "gameplay", and what makes the narrative of video games a form of new media functioning between the language of comic books and that of movies, by working with games including The Adventures of Tintin, Valiant Hearts: The Great War, Fahrenheit: Indigo Prophecy, and Syberia 3 (all available on iPad, iPhone, Android, and other mobile devices). Based on these games, this class will also address the topic of the figure of the hero, as it is culturally marked, and interrogate the epic character of heroism and the transmission of such values.

NOTES: Course taught in French. Usually offered every 2 to 3 years.
PREREQUISITES: French 240 or the equivalent

CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  Fall 2019 - Emmanuel Buzay


French 397X: French for Science and Engineering Professions

(New course offering—check back soon for course description.)

NOTES: Course taught in French. Usually offered every 2 to 3 years.
PREREQUISITES: French 240 or the equivalent

CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  Spring 2020 - Emmanuel Buzay


French 424: Renaissance Prose

The purpose of this course is to acquaint the participants with some works of late-medieval and Renaissance storytellers (French "conteurs"). We will read a variety of texts in the storytelling tradition, from Les Cent Nouvelles Nouvelles to Beroalde de Verville's Le Moyen de parvenir. We will place emphasis on genre definition, narratology, aesthetics and cultural history. Among the problems we will discuss together are the following: the relationship between ideology (courtly love, feudalism, humanism, evangelism, "Querelle des femmes", etc.) and literature; rhetoric and truth, historicity and exemplarity; imitation; intertextuality; "vraisemblance"; authority, authorship and gendered discourse; exemplarity, self-referentiality and identity.

NOTES: Course taught in French. Offered occasionally, generally in the fall semester.
PREREQUISITES: French 371, preferably 473, or permission of instructor.

CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  Fall 2019 - Philippe Baillargeon


French 427: Renaissance Poetry

The purpose of this course is to examine, through a series of close textual analyses, the attempts made by poets around 1550 to find modalities for self-expression in their quest for a new poetic language. Emphasis will be placed on the problematic nature of self-identity as a key to expressivity in the cultural and historical contexts when national literatures aim at reflecting and influencing major ideological and political changes (humanism, Evangelism and the Reformation, patriotism and the rise of the absolute monarchy). We will also consider the role of gender in the shaping of poetic identities. Among the poets to be considered are Clément Marot, Marguerite de Navarre, Maurice Scève, Pernette du Guillet, Louise Labé, Joachim du Bellay, Pierre de Ronsard, and Agrippa d'Aubigné.

NOTES: Course taught in French. Usually offered every 2 to 3 years.
PREREQUISITES: French 371, preferably 473, or permission of instructor.

CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  No


French 433: French Classicism 1660-1700

The essential theoretical and aesthetic components of French classical comedy and tragedy are studied with particular reference to the theaters of Moliere and Racine. Textual readings of plays by Moliere and Racine are enhanced with video screenings of their theatrical adaptations in contemporary French culture in order to widen the interpretive horizon for each text, as well as assess its reception and impact on contemporary culture.

NOTES: Course taught in French. Usually offered every 2 to 3 years.
PREREQUISITES: French 371, preferably 473, or permission of instructor.

CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  No


French 444: Eighteenth-Century Theater and Novel

The French Enlightenment involved a critical renewal of European political and philosophical self-understanding through an iconoclastic revision of literary and philosophical representational forms associated with the ancien regime. This "renewal" entailed a rethinking of the role of reason in political and social life, a re-conception of gender relations, and a redefinition of Europe's relationship with non-European cultures. We will follow the staging of this triple agenda in the works (novels and plays) of Montesquieu, Beaumarchais, Marivaux, Rousseau, Diderot, Laclos, Prévost, Voltaire, and other luminaries of the Encyclopédie movement.

NOTES: Course taught in French. Usually offered every 2 to 3 years.
PREREQUISITES: French 371, preferably 473, or permission of instructor.

CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  No


French 455: Nineteenth-Century Novel

Study of major trends in the nineteenth-century French novel. Specific topics will vary and may focus on a specific movement, author or theme. Current topic: The Realist Movement. Still perceived as a “minor” genre at the end of the eighteenth century, the novel quickly emerged as the modern literary form of choice in the years following the French Revolution. In this course we will trace the evolution of the novel with respect to the broad contexts of nineteenth-century French history and culture. We will focus in particular on the rise of French realism and its relation to the development of modernity in France, examining the treatment of such key themes as education and initiation, revolution, money and the commodification of culture, criminality, urban spaces, the changing roles of class and gender in French society, and the emerging contours of modern identity—along with its distinctively modern pathologies (alienation, boredom, addiction). We will also look at critical debates from the period on the nature of literary realism, as well as take up the question of realist representation in the visual arts, examining relevant work by artists, caricaturists and photographers. Taught in French, though students outside of French and Francophone Studies may write their papers in English.

NOTES: Course taught in French. Usually offered every 2 to 3 years.
PREREQUISITES: French 371, preferably 473, or permission of instructor.

CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  Spring 2020 - Luke Bouvier


French 457: Nineteenth-Century Poetry

Study of major trends in nineteenth-century French poetry. Specific topics will vary and may focus on a specific movement, author or theme. Current topic: The Invention of the Modern. "Il faut être absolument moderne," writes Rimbaud in Une saison en enfer. Against the rise of the novel, which quickly established itself in the years following the French Revolution as the preeminent literary form of the "modern," French poetry had to reinvent itself to maintain its relevance in a France undergoing rapid political, social, and economic change. In this seminar we will trace the evolution of French poetry in the nineteenth century with respect to the broader contexts of French history and culture. We will examine in particular the major poetic movements of the century (romanticism, the "Parnassian" group and the concept of "l'art pour l'art," symbolism) and their links with several key themes of modernity: revolution, nature, changing notions of the good and the beautiful, money and the commodification of culture, urban spaces (the street, the crowd, the arcade, the barricade, urbanism and architecture), the exotic, love and desire, and the appearance of the "modern" identity, together with its distinctly modern pathologies (alienation, boredom, nostalgia, addiction). Taught in French, though students outside of French and Francophone Studies may write their papers in English.

NOTES: Course taught in French. Usually offered every 2 to 3 years.
PREREQUISITES: French 371, preferably 473, or permission of instructor.

CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  No


French 465: Twentieth-Century Novel

Characterized by experimentation and by the crisis of representation, the French novel underwent numerous transformations in form, content, and boundaries throughout the 20th century. In this course, we will place these transformations in context as we discuss movements such as modernism, existentialism, the nouveau roman, and postmodernism.

NOTES: Course taught in French. Offered occasionally, generally in the spring semester.
PREREQUISITES: French 371, preferably 473, or permission of instructor.

CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  No


French 469: Twentieth-Century Theater

A study of major movements in twentieth-century French theater focusing on how playwrights address key social, political, and ethical issues such as the two World Wars and the nuclear age.

NOTES: Course taught in French. Offered infrequently, as staffing allows.
PREREQUISITES: French 371, preferably 473, or permission of instructor.

CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  No


French 473: Advanced Grammar and Composition II

The second of two consecutive courses devoted to advanced grammar review and composition (following French 371). Extensive written practice with various grammatical structures; frequent short writing assignments; introduction to literary analysis.

NOTES: Course taught in French. Offered every fall and spring semester.
PREREQUISITES: French 371 with a grade of C or higher, or equivalent.
CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  Fall 2019 - Eva Valenta Spring 2020 - Eva Valenta and Luke Bouvier


French 475: Business French

This course accommodates a range of proficiency levels: from intermediate high to advanced. It provides students with useful and practical tools to communicate in French in a professional setting. Course will focus on several topics of the French/Francophone business world, including the following:

  • Administrative structures of selected French-speaking countries, with greater emphasis on France
  • Aspects of the French economy
  • Organization and structure of French companies
  • Principles of marketing
  • Banking and financial industries
  • Job search: design, compose a CV, a letter of interest for a position in a French company; develop strategy for an effective and successful job interview in French
  • For students who are interested: Preparation for the Diplôme de français professionnel offered by the Chambre de Commerce et d'Industrie Paris Ile-de-France.

NOTES: Course taught in French. Usually offered every 2 to 3 years.
PREREQUISITES: French 371, or permission of instructor.

CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  No


French 494SI: Senior Seminar

The objective of this course is to offer a panoramic vision of French literature from the Middle Ages to the 21st century through a wide variety of representative literary texts, plays and films centered on the problematic of identity. We examine major currents and literary genres from the late Middle Ages to the beginning of the 21st century, studying political, social, and cultural contexts in conjunction with different conceptions of the modern subject in operation during each of the different time periods. The course satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for majors in French and Francophone Studies, who are expected to take the course in their last semester of the program.

NOTES: Course taught in French. Offered every spring semester.
PREREQUISITES: French 371, preferably 473, or permission of instructor.

CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  Spring 2020 - Eva Valenta


French 497B: Bohemians and Dandies in Nineteenth-Century Literature

A study of several interrelated figures of counter-cultural modernity that gained prominence in nineteenth-century French literature. We will examine the cultural and political contexts of their emergence and explore how and why they became productive literary types. In studying their aesthetic implications, we will examine in particular to what extent they constituted a challenge (or not) to various forms of authority in nineteenth-century France. Readings from Balzac, Mérimée, Vigny, Gautier, Baudelaire, Murger, Vallès and Brillat-Savarin. Requirements: active participation in class, several medium-length papers, midterm, final.

NOTES: Course taught in French. Offered occasionally, generally in the spring semester.
PREREQUISITES: French 371, preferably 473, or permission of instructor.

CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  No


French 497E: Colette, Duras, Sarraute

Colette, Marguerite Duras and Nathalie Sarraute are three of the most influential French women writers of the twentieth century. Each succeeded in developing her own highly unique and recognizably female writing voice, and we will examine representative texts of these three writers in order to gain better insights into each writer's uniqueness of voice, purpose and place within French twentieth-century literature.

NOTES: Course taught in French. Offered occasionally, generally in the spring semester.
PREREQUISITES: French 371, preferably 473, or permission of instructor.

CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  No


French 497J: Jules Verne: Introduction to Contemporary French Steampunk

In this class we will explore worlds filled with sea-world mechanics linked to the magic of electricity, mysterious gear-filled machines that go under water and in the sky, and steam-powered engines. What are these fictional worlds? They are instances of steampunk, a subgenre of science fiction and fantasy, in which the old and new, the real and the imaginary, technology and at times the supernatural mix together to create fascinating fictional worlds that allow us to explore essential questions concerning our own world and ourselves. This class is open to all students with an advanced level of French and will examine recent French steampunk narratives inspired by Jules Verne's novels, especially 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea and The Mysterious Island. The course will focus on the main characteristics of French steampunk fiction in the 20th and 21st centuries through the study of a short-story anthology, two comic books, and two videogames. One common theme of these works is the depiction of the Nautilus, the fictional submarine imagined by Jules Verne; we will explore this common thread in all of these narratives to question the idea of progress and civilization. Finally, we will focus on the relation between Jules Verne and the USA in some of these works, as well as what this fictional relationship between Verne and the USA could mean for us nowadays.

NOTES: Course taught in French. Offered occasionally.
PREREQUISITES: French 371, preferably 473, or permission of instructor.

CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  No


French 497K: Rousseau and the Enlightenment

At first sight, the work of J.-J. Rousseau appears to be marked by generic diversity and myriad self-contradictions, seemingly reflecting the multifaceted intellectual career of the man who composed it: the adventurer, dreamer, bel esprit, cultural theorist and critic, philosopher, antiphilosopher, literary artist, anti-artist, moralist, immoralist, feminist, anti-feminist, musician, political theorist, misanthrope, pessimist, idealist, and so on. But does this diversity render all questions of a unified vision impertinent? Broadly speaking, the weaving together in one corpus of political theory and instances of "pure" literary invention, of metaphysical speculations on the origins and destiny of human society and institutions, and complex and usually moving accounts of his own personal, unique, if problematic, involvement in that destiny: these factors act in concert to give Rousseau's work its enduring challenging and stimulating quality. It is hardly surprising then that his work continues to engage the attention of some of the most prominent minds—structuralists (e.g. Levi-Strauss), philosophers (Gouhier, Derrida), literary theorists (De Man, Starobinski), and feminist critics (Kofman, Irigaray), to name only a few—in the human and social sciences today. More interestingly for our purposes, the work combines a theory and radical critique of language and representation in general with an unrelenting "existentialist" reflection on issues of political and social ethics. How do these two movements interact? Adopting a primarily "literary" approach to this corpus, we shall attempt—through readings selected from both theoretical and fictional works—to arrive at an understanding of how the two challenge and/or complement each other. We shall also attempt to trace the extent of their involvement with the French Enlightenment movement in its ideological struggle with the Ancien Régime, and identify ways in which they bear on theoretical issues in our contemporary literary culture. Each attending student would be required do one oral presentation and a 15-20-page term paper.

NOTES: Course taught in French. Offered occasionally.
PREREQUISITES: French 371, preferably 473, or permission of instructor.

CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  No


French 497X: Du texte à l'écran: étude de quelques adaptations cinématographiques françaises

(New course offering—check back soon for course description.)

NOTES: Course taught in French. Offered occasionally.
PREREQUISITES: French 371, preferably 473, or permission of instructor.

CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  Spring 2020 - Emmanuel Buzay


French 564: Literature of Africa and the Caribbean

Cultural colonization and decolonization, the Négritude movement, contemporary writing in francophone West Africa, Haiti, and the French West Indies.

NOTES: Course taught in French. Usually offered every 2 to 3 years.
PREREQUISITES: Open to both graduate and advanced undergraduate students, or by instructor permission.

CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  Fall 2019 - Patrick Mensah


French 572: Basic Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages

This course will explore the teaching of foreign/second languages from theoretical, historical, and practical perspectives. Students will engage in a range of activities designed to reinforce their understanding of the material and guide its application to their developing language teaching practices. The course is intended for both experienced and inexperienced language teachers.

NOTES: Course taught in English. Usually offered once every 2 years.
PREREQUISITES: Designed primarily for teacher education students, but open to all interested graduate and advanced undergraduate students.

CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  No


French 584: French Canadian Literature

The purpose of this course is to acquaint the participants with some novelistic, poetic, and dramatic texts from Quebec with emphasis on the problematic of identity (national, cultural, and sexual). We will study the development of national literature in Quebec and its relation to ideological and political identity from the colonial era, "la Conquête" (1760), to the contemporary period. We shall mainly study the works of Quebec's novelists, poets, and playwrights in conjunction with the works of essayists and filmmakers.

NOTES: Course taught in French. Offered occasionally, generally in the fall semester.
PREREQUISITES: Open to both graduate and advanced undergraduate students, or by instructor permission.

CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  No


French 592S: Microteaching: Pre-Practicum

The purpose of this 2-credit Pre-Practicum Seminar is to prepare second-year teacher licensure students for the upcoming full-time student teaching experience, both pedagogically and psychologically. The seminar is designed for those licensure students who are currently interning with the individual who will become their supervising practitioner in the spring semester. Students attend weekly cohort meetings to discuss and reflect on their experiences and observations in the public schools; to discuss ideas presented in pertinent articles and films; to teach mini-lessons; to refine their personal philosophy of education, and to begin to work on the assessments required for initial teacher licensure by the French and Francophone Studies Program and by the State Department of Elementary and Secondary Education.

NOTES: Course taught in English. Offered every fall semester.
PREREQUISITES: Open to MAT students and to undergraduate and post-baccalaureate teacher education students completing their pre-practicum requirements.

CREDITS: 2
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  Fall 2019 - Rhonda Tarr


French 597E: The Teacher in the Middle and High School Classroom

French 597E is a 2-credit support seminar that was created for student teachers of French who are in the process of completing their full-time student teaching internship in a public middle or high school in Massachusetts. The purpose of this seminar is to provide a supportive place where initial licensure candidates reflect upon and articulate their developing identity as teachers, and explore and reflect upon the complexities of teaching within their particular classrooms and communities, as well as within the broader social context of education. The seminar informs teaching candidates of the responsibilities and requirements of the student teaching practicum; provides a space of confidentiality in which candidates reflect on and discuss issues specifically related to their student teaching experiences; supports them in developing their required student teaching portfolios, and guides them in locating a suitable teaching position upon completion of the program.

NOTES: Course taught in English. Offered every spring semester.
PREREQUISITES: Open to MAT students and to undergraduate and post-baccalaureate teacher education students. Must be taken concurrently with FrenchEd 500U: Student Teaching Practicum.

CREDITS: 2
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  Spring 2020 - Rhonda Tarr


French 597LM: Late Medieval and Renaissance Storytellers

The purpose of this seminar is to acquaint the participants with some works of late-medieval and Renaissance storytellers (French "conteurs"). We will read a variety of texts in the storytelling tradition, from Les Cent Nouvelles Nouvelles to Beroalde de Verville's Le Moyen de parvenir. We will place emphasis on genre definition, narratology, aesthetics and cultural history. Among the problems we will discuss together are the following: the relationship between ideology (courtly love, feudalism, humanism, evangelism, etc.) and literature; rhetoric and truth; historicity and exemplarity; imitation, intertextuality and "vraisemblance"; authority, authorship and gendered discourse, self-referentiality and identity.

NOTES: Course taught in French. Offered occasionally, generally in the fall semester.
PREREQUISITES: Open to both graduate and advanced undergraduate students, or by instructor permission.

CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  No


French 597P: Exoticisms

This course will examine the role of the exotic in nineteenth-century French narrative works. We will explore various aesthetic and epistemological functions of exoticism and the problems and paradoxes it raises in its evolution as a romantic, realist and decadent topos. We will pay particular attention to the problems of representing difference and the unknown, the role of the exoticizing gaze with respect to subjectivity and nineteenth-century discourses of identity—racial, gender, class and national—and the broader cultural and political uses of exoticism in a globalizing nineteenth-century France. Readings from Chateaubriand, Balzac, Madame de Duras, Mérimée, Gautier, Baudelaire, Flaubert and Loti. Taught in French, though students outside of French and Francophone Studies may write their papers in English.

NOTES: Course taught in French. Offered occasionally, generally in the spring semester.
PREREQUISITES: Open to both graduate and advanced undergraduate students, or by instructor permission.

CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  No


French 597S: Literary Childhoods

This seminar will examine the development of the modern French autobiographical tradition through the emergence and evolution of the récit d'enfance, or childhood narrative, from the late eighteenth century to the present. Seven primary works will be the focus of our study: Rousseau, Les Confessions (excerpts); Chateaubriand, Mémoires d’outre-tombe (excerpts); Stendhal, La Vie de Henry Brulard; Vallès, L'Enfant; Proust, Combray; Sartre, Les Mots; Sarraute, Enfance. In these works, we will attempt to elucidate the problems and paradoxes of the autobiographical project, focusing in particular on the concept of childhood as a privileged autobiographical entity, the emergence of subjectivity, the paradoxes of figuring and disfiguring the self, the peculiar status of fiction within the textual creation of the self, and problems of voice and orality in self-representation. Selected critical texts drawing on a variety of theoretical perspectives, including deconstructive and psychoanalytic approaches. Taught in French, though students outside of French and Francophone Studies may write their papers in English.

NOTES: Course taught in French. Offered occasionally, generally in the spring semester.
PREREQUISITES: Open to both graduate and advanced undergraduate students, or by instructor permission.

CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  No


French 624: Renaissance Prose

The purpose of this course is to acquaint the participants with some works of late-medieval and Renaissance storytellers (French "conteurs"). We will read a variety of texts in the storytelling tradition, from Les Cent Nouvelles Nouvelles to Beroalde de Verville's Le Moyen de parvenir. We will place emphasis on genre definition, narratology, aesthetics and cultural history. Among the problems we will discuss together are the following: the relationship between ideology (courtly love, feudalism, humanism, evangelism, "Querelle des femmes", etc.) and literature; rhetoric and truth, historicity and exemplarity; imitation; intertextuality; "vraisemblance"; authority, authorship and gendered discourse; exemplarity, self-referentiality and identity.

NOTES: Course taught in French. Offered occasionally, generally in the fall semester.
PREREQUISITES: Open to graduate students (usually cross-listed with French 424 for undergraduates).

CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  Fall 2019 - Philippe Baillargeon


French 631: Seventeenth-Century Comic Vision

A cross-generic study of the representation of the writer at work and the interrelationship between literature and society in Molière's time. Emphasis on works by Molière, La Fontaine, Bussy-Rabutin, Mme de Sévigné.

NOTES: Course taught in French. Offered occasionally.
PREREQUISITES: Open to graduate students, or by instructor permission to undergraduates.

CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  No


French 632: Seventeenth-Century Tragic Vision

(Check back soon for course description.)

NOTES: Course taught in French. Offered occasionally.
PREREQUISITES: Open to graduate students, or by instructor permission to undergraduates.

CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  No


French 644: Eighteenth-Century Literature

Variable topics, including chief writers and thinkers of the Age of Enlightenment; the satirical novel and the sentimental novel, and readings in the French theater from LeSage to Beaumarchais.

NOTES: Course taught in French. Usually offered every 2 to 3 years.
PREREQUISITES: Open to graduate students (usually cross-listed with French 444 for undergraduates).

CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  No


French 655: Nineteenth-Century Novel

Study of major trends in the nineteenth-century French novel. Specific topics will vary and may focus on a specific movement, author or theme. Current topic: The Realist Movement. Still perceived as a “minor” genre at the end of the eighteenth century, the novel quickly emerged as the modern literary form of choice in the years following the French Revolution. In this course we will trace the evolution of the novel with respect to the broad contexts of nineteenth-century French history and culture. We will focus in particular on the rise of French realism and its relation to the development of modernity in France, examining the treatment of such key themes as education and initiation, revolution, money and the commercialization of culture, criminality, urban spaces, the changing roles of class and gender in French society, and the emerging contours of modern identity—along with its distinctively modern pathologies (alienation, boredom, addiction). We will also look at critical debates from the period on the nature of literary realism, as well as take up the question of realist representation in the visual arts, examining relevant work by artists, caricaturists and photographers. Taught in French, though students outside of French Studies may write their papers in English.

NOTES: Course taught in French. Usually offered every 2 to 3 years.
PREREQUISITES: Open to graduate students (usually cross-listed with French 455 for undergraduates).

CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  Spring 2020 - Luke Bouvier


French 657: Nineteenth-Century Poetry

Study of major trends in nineteenth-century French poetry. Specific topics will vary and may focus on a specific movement, author or theme. Current topic: The Invention of the Modern. "Il faut être absolument moderne," writes Rimbaud in Une saison en enfer. Against the rise of the novel, which quickly established itself in the years following the French Revolution as the preeminent literary form of the "modern," French poetry had to reinvent itself to maintain its relevance in a France undergoing rapid political, social, and economic change. In this seminar we will trace the evolution of French poetry in the nineteenth century with respect to the broader contexts of French history and culture. We will examine in particular the major poetic movements of the century (romanticism, the "Parnassian" group and the concept of "l'art pour l'art," symbolism) and their links with several key themes of modernity: revolution, nature, changing notions of the good and the beautiful, money and the commodification of culture, urban spaces (the street, the crowd, the arcade, the barricade, urbanism and architecture), the exotic, love and desire, and the appearance of the "modern" identity, together with its distinctly modern pathologies (alienation, boredom, nostalgia, addiction). Taught in French, though students outside of French and Francophone Studies may write their papers in English.

NOTES: Course taught in French. Usually offered every 2 to 3 years.
PREREQUISITES: Open to graduate students (usually cross-listed with French 457 for undergraduates).

CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  No


French 667: Twentieth-Century Poetry

An exploration of interactions between twentieth-century French poetry and the visual arts, with emphasis on the first half of the century.  Topics include calligrams; the connections between art and poetry in works by Apollinaire, Reverdy, Cendrars, and Desnos; the illustrated book, in which poems are accompanied by artists' renditions or in which artists' drawings are then "illustrated" by poems; the representation of objects in Breton and Ponge; Eluard's poems describing painters; and the ekphrastic poetry of Michaux and Heather Dohollau.

NOTES: Course taught in French. Offered infrequently, as staffing allows.
PREREQUISITES: Open to graduate students, or by instructor permission to undergraduates.

CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  No


French 670: Expository Prose

The purpose of the course is to improve the ability to write effective French prose, in particular for the purposes of literary and cultural analysis. Coursework includes discussion of short literary works in French, regular compositions on these works (including rewrites), stylistic exercises, vocabulary-building exercises and short translations.

NOTES: Course taught in French. Offered every fall semester.
PREREQUISITES: Open to graduate students, or by instructor permission to undergraduates.

CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  Fall 2019 - Luke Bouvier


French 672: Teaching Assistant Workshop

A weekly workshop/class for all graduate students teaching French language classes for the first time.The course will introduce current methods and ideas of language teaching and testing and will focus on the courses they are actually teaching. There are no exams or papers but there will be biweekly presentations.

NOTES: Course taught in English. Offered every fall semester.
PREREQUISITES: Open to first-semester French M.A. and M.A.T. students, as well as other graduate students teaching French for the first time.

CREDITS: 2
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  Fall 2019 - Rhonda Tarr


French 683: Textual and Literary Analysis

Combines theory and practice. Explores the potential for textual analysis based on literary texts from several different periods and genres, and in relation to a number of contemporary theoretical perspectives: feminism; Marxism, postcolonial studies; psychoanalysis; reader-response and reception theory; structuralist poetics and semiotics. Of particular interest to graduate students in the humanities and social sciences.

NOTES: Course taught in French. Offered occasionally.
PREREQUISITES: Open to graduate students, or by instructor permission to undergraduates.

CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  No


French 697A: M.A.T. Practicum: Teaching French and Francophone Literature and Civilization in High Schools

A practicum designed to prepare graduate students to teach French and Francophone literature and culture on the high-school level.

NOTES: Course taught in French. Usually offered once every 2 years.
PREREQUISITES: Designed primarily for M.A.T. students, but open to all interested graduate students (and advanced undergraduates with instructor permission).

CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  No


French 697K: Rousseau and the Enlightenment

At first sight, the work of J.-J. Rousseau appears to be marked by generic diversity and myriad self-contradictions, seemingly reflecting the multifaceted intellectual career of the man who composed it: the adventurer, dreamer, bel esprit, cultural theorist and critic, philosopher, antiphilosopher, literary artist, anti-artist, moralist, immoralist, feminist, anti-feminist, musician, political theorist, misanthrope, pessimist, idealist, and so on. But does this diversity render all questions of a unified vision impertinent? Broadly speaking, the weaving together in one corpus of political theory and instances of "pure" literary invention, of metaphysical speculations on the origins and destiny of human society and institutions, and complex and usually moving accounts of his own personal, unique, if problematic, involvement in that destiny: these factors act in concert to give Rousseau's work its enduring challenging and stimulating quality. It is hardly surprising then that his work continues to engage the attention of some of the most prominent minds—structuralists (e.g. Levi-Strauss), philosophers (Gouhier, Derrida), literary theorists (De Man, Starobinski), and feminist critics (Kofman, Irigaray), to name only a few—in the human and social sciences today. More interestingly for our purposes, the work combines a theory and radical critique of language and representation in general with an unrelenting "existentialist" reflection on issues of political and social ethics. How do these two movements interact? Adopting a primarily "literary" approach to this corpus, we shall attempt—through readings selected from both theoretical and fictional works—to arrive at an understanding of how the two challenge and/or complement each other. We shall also attempt to trace the extent of their involvement with the French Enlightenment movement in its ideological struggle with the Ancien Régime, and identify ways in which they bear on theoretical issues in our contemporary literary culture. Each attending student would be required do one oral presentation and a 15-20-page term paper.

NOTES: Course taught in French. Offered occasionally.
PREREQUISITES: Open to graduate students (usually cross-listed with French 497K for undergraduates).

CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  No


French 697J: Jules Verne: Introduction to Contemporary French Steampunk

In this class we will explore worlds filled with sea-world mechanics linked to the magic of electricity, mysterious gear-filled machines that go under water and in the sky, and steam-powered engines. What are these fictional worlds? They are instances of steampunk, a subgenre of science fiction and fantasy, in which the old and new, the real and the imaginary, technology and at times the supernatural mix together to create fascinating fictional worlds that allow us to explore essential questions concerning our own world and ourselves. This class is open to all students with an advanced level of French and will examine recent French steampunk narratives inspired by Jules Verne's novels, especially 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea and The Mysterious Island. The course will focus on the main characteristics of French steampunk fiction in the 20th and 21st centuries through the study of a short-story anthology, two comic books, and two videogames. One common theme of these works is the depiction of the Nautilus, the fictional submarine imagined by Jules Verne; we will explore this common thread in all of these narratives to question the idea of progress and civilization. Finally, we will focus on the relation between Jules Verne and the USA in some of these works, as well as what this fictional relationship between Verne and the USA could mean for us nowadays.

NOTES: Course taught in French. Offered occasionally.
PREREQUISITES: Open to graduate students (usually cross-listed with French 497J for undergraduates).

CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  No


French 697X: Du texte à l'écran: étude de quelques adaptations cinématographiques françaises

(New course offering—check back soon for course description.)

NOTES: Course taught in French. Offered occasionally.
PREREQUISITES: Open to graduate students (usually cross-listed with French 497X for undergraduates).

CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  Spring 2020 - Emmanuel Buzay


French 728: La Pléiade & l'École de Lyon

The purpose of this seminar is to examine the evolution of two of the main "poetic schools" active through the mid-sixteenth century in France: l'École de Lyon and La Pléiade. We will explore the poetics of these groups through the works of their "leaders": main representatives such as Joachim du Bellay and Ronsard for La Pléiade, and Maurice Scève and Louise Labé for l'École de Lyon, but also through the poetry of various of their satellites and lesser-known figures. We will examine the fluctuations in the evolution of the expression of self-identity in the cultural and historical contexts when national literatures aim at reflecting and influencing major ideological and political changes.

NOTES: Course taught in French. Offered occasionally, generally in the fall semester.
PREREQUISITES: Open to graduate students, or by instructor permission to undergraduates.

CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  No


French 801: Contemporary Critical Theory

(Check back soon for course description.)

NOTES: Course taught in French. Offered occasionally.
PREREQUISITES: Open to graduate students, or by instructor permission to undergraduates.

CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  No


French 809: Genre Course: Theater

A diachronic study of French and Francophone theater from Medieval Drama to the contemporary stage, with reference to a wide range of theoretical approaches. The course will examine major movements in the rich history of French theater, including classicism, romanticism, realism, surrealism, and the theater of the absurd. Theater as social commentary; relationships between theater and religion, political movements, postcolonialism, and questions of gender and race. Team-taught, drawing on the expertise of the French and Francophone Studies faculty.

NOTES: Course taught in French. Offered occasionally.
PREREQUISITES: Open to graduate students, or by instructor permission to undergraduates.

CREDITS: 3
CURRENTLY OFFERED?  No