The University of Massachusetts Amherst

News and Events

Food scientist’s study finds that food additives commonly found in sweets causes an imbalance of gut microbiota in mice

A common food additive, recently banned in France but allowed in the U.S. and many other countries, was found to significantly alter gut microbiota in mice, causing inflammation in the colon and changes in protein expression in the liver, according to research led by a University of Massachusetts Amherst food scientist. CNS News June 30, 2020

 

USDA funds UMass FUEL program which provides undergrads with research and internship experience

The University of Massachusetts Amherst Department of Food Science has been awarded a five-year, $482,549 grant to fund an experiential learning program for undergraduates, including independent research opportunities with faculty mentors and paid summer internships with industrial partners in the greater Boston area. 

CNS News July 17, 2020

 

 

Is it Safe to Spin-Dry Leafy Greens in a Washing Machine?

Some of the nearly 1,000 small farmers in New England who grow leafy greens use a creative, efficient and cost-effective method of drying the fresh veggies after a triple dip in water: a conventional home washing machine.  An important question lingers about this practice, which University of Massachusetts Amherst food scientists hope to answer: Is it safe? News & Media Relations April 21, 2020

 

Virologist explains why consumers shouldn’t fear the grocery store amidst the COVID-19 outbreak

As states continue issuing quarantine guidelines and rumors swirl about lockdowns, many people are stocking up on food and other essentials. But during a global outbreak, how safe is the grocery store? People are left in a catch-22 knowing that if they don’t venture to the supermarket they could be left without food, while also fearing contracting coronavirus while shopping. Virologist Matthew Moore, food science, debunks myths about grocery shopping amidst the coronavirus pandemic in a recent article published on The Hill. 

CNS News March 18, 2020

UMass sensory scientist researches how diminished taste function can affect cancer patients’ post-treatment diets

Raspberries

Alissa Nolden of UMass food Science set out to review the literature about the impact of cancer patients’ sense of taste and smell on their “food behavior,” defined as any behavior that affects patients’ overall nutritional health, such as their desire to eat, food preferences and consumption. Nolden’s goal is to develop a better understanding of changes in taste and how that affects cancer patients’ ability to enjoy food and meet optimum nutritional needs during and after treatment.  Her review evaluated 11 studies published between 1982 and 2018 “that psychophysically measured taste and smell function and assessed some aspect of food behavior.” Nolden found a reduced taste function, particularly for sweet flavors, among people with cancer. And that diminished taste was associated with a reduced appetite; avoidance of certain foods, including meat; and a lower intake of calories and protein.  CNS News December 18, 2019

 

David Julian McClements, Eric Decker and Hang Xiao are recognized among world’s most highly cited scientists

Ten researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst have been recognized for being among the world’s most highly cited researchers in 2019 by London-based Clarivate Analytics, owner of the Web of Science. The ten UMass Amherst researchers recognized on the 2019 list are Catrine Tudor-Locke and Laura Vandenberg of the School of Public Health and Health Sciences, food scientists David Julian McClements, Eric Decker and Hang Xiao, microbiologist Kelly Nevin and Derek Lovley, materials scientist Thomas Russell and chemist Vincent Rotello in the College of Natural Sciences, and environmental chemist Baoshan Xing of the Stockbridge School of Agriculture. See more details on UMass News & Media Relations. November 22, 2019.

Food scientists create a model for NASA to predict spaceflight vitamin degradation

A team of food scientists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst has developed a groundbreaking, user-friendly mathematical model for NASA to help ensure that astronauts’ food remains rich in nutrients during extended missions in space.

The new research, published in the journal Food Chemistry, gives NASA a time-saving shortcut to predict the degradation of vitamins in spaceflight food over time and more accurately and efficiently schedule resupplying trips. The investigation was funded with a $982,685 grant from NASA.

College of Natural Sciences News Spetember 18, 2019 

 

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