UMass Amherst College of NRE

 

 

 

 

 

THE UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS, AMHERST ACADEMIC QUALITY ASSESSMENT AND DEVELOPMENT (AQAD REVIEW)

 

 

DEPARTMENT OF FOOD SCIENCE

APRIL 4-5, 2002

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

University of Massachusetts

Amherst

 

 

 

 

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page(s)

REVIEW TEAM MEMBERS

5

PURPOSE OF THE REVIEW

6

CHALLENGES AND CONCERNS

Teaching

Research

Outreach

6-7

7

7

7

DEPARTMENT OVERVIEW

Department Mission

Department Resources

Department Location

Faculty Contributions to Areas of Emphasis in the Department of Food Science

Food and Environmental Biotechnology

Health and Wellness

Physical-Chemical Properties of Food

Safety of Food

Teaching

Outreach

Service

Alumni/ae Advisory Board and Strategic Research

8-10

8

8

8

8

9

9

9-10

10

10

10

10

10

GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND STRATEGIC PRIORITIES AND THEIR LINKAGE TO THE COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY

The First Strategic Plan

The 2001 Strategic Plan

Food and Environmental Biotechnology

Physical-Chemical Properties of Food

The Safety of Food

Health and Wellness

Goals

Alignment Of The Strategic Plan To The College

The Department Within the Context of the College, the University and the Commonwealth

Student Enrollment and Recruiting

Department, College and University Committees

Promotion of Diversity

Contributions to Campus Wide Curricular Needs

Current Standing and Goals for Future National Standing

 

11-27

11-12

12-13

13-14

14

14-15

15-16

16

16

17

17-19

19-20

20

21

21-27

FACULTY, QUALITY AND PRODUCTIVITY

Department Planning for Effectiveness

Faculty Background, Experience and Credentials

Programs Expectations for Faculty

Professional Development and Growth of Faculty

Outreach to Off Campus Constituencies

National and International Activities

Industrial Alumni Advisory Board

Off Campus Teaching

Symposia

Small and/or Start-up Companies

Seafood Industry

Strategic Research Alliance

28-54

28-29

31-48

48-49

49-50

50

51-52

52

52

53

53

53

54

TEACHING/LEARNING AND CURRICULUM

The Undergraduate Program

The Graduate Program

Placement and Recruiting

Faculty Involvement and Effectiveness in Teaching

55-60

55-56

56-58

58

58-60

RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT, MAXIMIZATION AND USE

Strategies for Developing Revenue

Allocations of Resources

Maximization of Human Resources

Maximization of Material Resources

61-67

61-65

65-66

66

67

FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT BY AREAS OF EMPHASIS

Food Safety

Food Biotechnology

Physico-Chemical Properties Analytical Equipment

Health and Wellness

Concluding Observations

67-71

67-68

68-69

69-71

71

71

LIST OF TABLES

Table 1. Undergraduate and Graduate Enrollment (Food Science)

Table 2. Degrees Awarded by Degree Program Level (Food Science)

Table 3. Instruction to Majors and Non-Majors (Food Science)

Table 4. Selected academic accomplishments of the Food Science Faculty over the last

decade

Table 5. University of Massachusetts-Amherst Graduating Senior Survey 1998-2000

Department Results Food Science

Table 6. All Gifts and matching gifts to the Department of Food Science Between FY 1990

and FY 2001 including the Strategic Research Alliance

Table 7. Grants and expenditures from 1991-92 through 2000-01 Allocations of Resources

 

22-23

24-25

26-27

 

30

 

60

 

63

64

 

REVIEW TEAM MEMBERS

Dr. Catherine W. Donnelly

Professor

University of Vermont

Department of Nutrition and Food Science

200 Carrigan Hall

Burlington, VT 05405

TEL: (802) 656-8300

FAX: (802) 656-0407

Email: [CWDadrs14p.jpg]

 

Dr. J. Bruce German

John E. Kinsella Endowed Chair in Food Nutrition & Health

Department of Food Science and Technology

University of California/Davis

Davis, CA 95616

TEL: (530) 752-1486

FAX: (530) 752-4759

Email: [JBGadrs14p.jpg]

 

Dr. Donald B. Thompson (Chair)

Professor

Pennsylvania State University

Department of Food Science

111 Borland Laboratory

University Park, PA 16802

TEL: (814) 863-0481

FAX: (814) 863-6132

Email: [DBTadrs14p.jpg]

 

PURPOSE OF THE REVIEW

Academic Quality Assessment and Development (AQAD) is a component of the University Performance Measurement System. The primary purpose of this component is to assess and improve the core academic functions of teaching and learning, research/professional/creative activity, and public service/academic outreach through an ongoing system of quality control/program assessment at the unit level (i.e., department or program).

Each UMass campus has established, in consultation with the President’s Office and in accordance with the system-level guidelines adopted by the Board of Trustees (Doc. T980-033), procedures for implementing AQAD, a copy of which may be found in the attached Appendices.

The faculty of the Department of Food Science began preparing its self assessment in the spring of 2001. Following our earliest meetings the Department Head met with Dr. Bryan Harvey of the Provost’s Office and in a separate meeting with Dr. Cleve Willis, Dean of the College of Food and Natural Resources to discuss our program, AQAD, the areas which we wished to cover and the manner in which we would address the questions posed by AQAD. The faculty met early in the Fall of 2001 to set up committee assignments. Several ad hoc committees were formed, individual faculty volunteered to draft portions of the report and the Graduate Policies Committee and the Undergraduate Policies Committee covered the graduate and undergraduate programs respectively. When available University data bases were used. In some cases these were not applicable or available. For instance the University data for comparisons to other Departments were not of value according to Ms. Marilyn Hecht Blaustein, Director of the Office of Institutional Studies because so few Departments were available and the coding system used in the Departments was variable.

The entire faculty met at least once a month during the entire fall semester to conduct the assessment.

After collecting all the various inputs the report was written and distributed to the faculty for final review.

This report is the end product of the process described which was, in total, a challenging and rewarding experience for the faculty and the Department. The challenges and concerns which are noted along with the actions the Department is taking to address them are discussed in various sections of the report.

We look forward to the Committee’s view of our efforts in building and maintaining a Department with high standards of excellence.

CHALLENGES AND CONCERNS

Teaching

  1. Increase enrollment in our undergraduate program
  2. Introduce and integrate biotechnology into the undergraduate curriculum
  3. Integrate and interrelate food commodities with the most recent advances in food science, health and safety
  4. Expand our curriculum to cover concepts in functional foods
  5. Expand and update laboratory and pilot plant equipment for teaching
  6. Using computers as a teaching tool and increasing computer/internet use in the curriculum
  7. Coping with the potential of budget cuts for TA’s and teaching supplies
  8. Investigate offering the UMass Amherst Food Science Undergraduate degree to other Universities, including those in the Commonwealth, via the internet
  9. Limited funding for Teaching Assistants may provide disincentives to curriculum expansion
  10. Marketing our real time video MS Program to Industry
  11. Expansion of internships, the BS/MS program and the honors option
  12. Continue to evaluate our graduate degree programs to insure they meet the changing science, research and industry climate

Research

  1. Maintain the ability to obtain state of the art laboratory equipment
  2. Insure that our research facilities and space meet the needs of our programs
  3. Continue self evaluation of our current research areas of emphasis in order to insure relevancy, cutting edge science and our ability to generate external funds
  4. Continue to focus on expanded industry funded research through our Strategic Research Alliance and elsewhere
  5. Maintaining Faculty and Staff positions in times of severe budgetary constraints

Outreach

  1. Does the Department receive recognition and credit for its outreach: Strategic Research Alliance, technical and scientific advising, technical assistance and consulting, etc.?
  2. Evaluate the expansion of Symposia, workshops and seminars
  3. Continue to integrate research and teaching with outreach activities which would include any off campus BS or MS programs discussed under teaching

 

DEPARTMENT OVERVIEW

The Department of Food Science is the oldest Food Science Department in the Nation, the major academic center for Food Science in New England and the only research oriented Department of Food Science in Massachusetts. As such it has fulfilled the goals which were set for it on its inception at the University of Massachusetts as the Department of Horticultural Manufactures on April 27, 1918. It kept that name for 1918-1944 and then went through a period of evolution from the Department of Food Technology 1944-1962, to the Department of Food Science and Technology and then to the Department of Food Science and Nutrition in the period 1962-1988 and finally the Department of Food Science from 1988 to the present. The Department and its current faculty work in a creative and open environment developing policy and strategies as a whole which insures optimum discourse and follow through on our goals. An interesting history of the Department from 1918-1993 is included in the Appendices and a great deal of information can be obtained about all aspects of the current Department from our website http://www.umass.edu/foodsci/.

Department Mission

The education of undergraduate, graduate and nontraditional students in the field of Food science and the study and application of science and technology to further basic knowledge, add value, foster economic development and provide a safe, healthful and high quality food supply consistent with the mission of a Land Grant University.

Department Resources

Faculty: The Department has eleven faculty consisting of eight professors and three associate professors, which includes F.M. Clydesdale, the chair, and H.O. Hultin, Director of the Marine Station in Gloucester.

Advisory Board: The Department instituted an Alumni Industrial Advisory Board some 12 years ago. This Board has 20 members all of whom are Vice Presidents, the equivalent or higher. The Board meets formally twice a year and often informally. The Advisory Board is an extremely valuable resource for support, advice and counsel.

Adjunct Faculty: The Department has several active adjunct Professors who provide guest lectures and seminars.

Staff: Two and one-half secretaries, one and a half bookkeepers and 4 technicians at Amherst, one-half secretary and a professional staff person at Gloucester.

Graduate Students: The Department has a range of between 40-50 graduate students and 10-20 Post Doc/Visiting Scientists.

Undergraduate Students: The Department has a range of 30-40 undergraduate student majors.

Department Location

The Department is housed in Chenoweth Laboratory on the Amherst campus and has a Marine Station in Gloucester, Massachusetts.

Faculty Contributions to Areas of Emphasis in the Department of Food Science

Inherent in both the Strategic Plan and Staffing Plans of the Department of Food Science is the integration of faculty and resources such that faculty take part in more than one area of emphasis. This allows optimization of both human and hard resources while stimulating innovation. Also inherent in the plan is the utilization of faculty and resources from other Departments but that contribution is not be included here.

Because of this integration we divide contributions in each area into Core Faculty and Contributing Faculty as follows: Areas of expertise and interest of individual faculty will be covered in more detail in a later section.

Food and Environmental Biotechnology

Core Faculty: Dr. Shetty

Contributing Faculty: Drs. Decker, Hultin, Labbe, Levin, Mahoney and McLandsborough

Health and Wellness

Core Faculty: Drs. Chinachoti, Clydesdale, Decker, Mahoney and Shetty

Contributing Faculty: Dr. Hultin and Dr. McLandsborough

Physical-Chemical Properties of Food

Core Faculty: Drs. Chinachoti, Clydesdale, Decker, Hultin, Mahoney, McClements and Peleg

Contributing Faculty: Drs. McLandsborough and Shetty

Safety of Food

Core Faculty: Drs. Labbe, Levin, McLandsborough and Shetty

Contributing Faculty: Drs. Clydesdale, Chinachoti, McClements and Peleg

In addition we have the following active adjunct faculty:

Dr. Julie Caswell, Professor, Department of Resource Economics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Dr. F.J. Francis, Professor Emeritus, Department of Food Science, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Mr. John Lupien, Retired Director, Food and Nutrition Division, FAO/UN, Rome, Italy

Dr. R.E. Mudgett, Retired Professor, Department of Food Science, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Dr. W.W. Nawar, Retired Professor, Department of Food Science, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Dr. H.G. Schwartzberg, Professor Emeritus, Department of Food Science, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Dr. Christine Lewis Taylor, Director, Office of Nutritional Products, Labeling and Dietary Supplements, USFDA

Teaching

Teaching, learning and advising are extremely highly regarded in the Department as will be evident in a more detailed discussion later in the report. As a Department we are committed to not only providing the highest quality education for our undergraduate majors and graduate students but also to all students in the University community via service courses, and non traditional students both on and off campus. As a result, in addition to our undergraduate and graduate courses for majors, we have four large service courses, enrolling some 700 students per year, and have developed an off campus MS program to be taught via compressed video in real time. Two of the service courses satisfy University General Education requirements, one for Biological Sciences and the other for Physical Sciences. The other two are electives for the University Community. We are currently in negotiations with a major corporation who is interested in our off campus MS program which graduated 17 MS students in another corporation a few years ago. All courses are taught by faculty with graduate students assisting in laboratories and discussion sections.

Outreach

The Department views outreach as a natural extension of our teaching and research efforts to external constituencies which includes any group outside of the University who has an interest in our activities or who might benefit from interactions with our Department. This includes, but is not limited to, citizens of the Commonwealth, alumni/ae, local, statewide and national food industries, government and universities. The Department also operates on the basis that outreach activities may, in some instances, be important sources of external funding. In other instances opportunities to transfer technology to stimulate the economy and create jobs may be conducted pro bono. In both these instances we have been quite successful.

Service

Our faculty serve and or have served as members or chairs of key committees, and the faculty senate at the Department, College and University level, nationally and internationally.

Alumni/ae Advisory Board and Strategic Research Alliance

Key components of the success the Department over the past twelve years have included an increased emphasis on alumni/ae relations, the formation of an Alumni Industry Advisory Board and the creation of an industrial partnership named the Strategic Research Alliance.

GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND STRATEGIC PRIORITIES AND THEIR LINKAGE TO THE COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY

The University of Massachusetts is a Land Grant Institution and as such has a tripartite mission of teaching, research and outreach/service. The Department of Food science has, therefore, aligned its mission and strategic plans with the University mission and its goal of achieving excellence in all its programs.

The First Strategic Plan

We began development of our first strategic plan in 1990 and completed it for the period 1993-1998. The following objectives were outlined in that plan:

We were most fortunate to achieve all the objectives of our initial plan. We developed a mission statement which has evolved into our current mission statement but perhaps our greatest accomplishment was to hire four outstanding new faculty members who have individually developed world class programs while collectively working with the rest of the faculty to achieve programmatic goals in our areas of excellence.

We saw a dramatic rise from external funds and through our efforts with alumni/ae and the formation of an Alumni Industrial Advisory Board we were able to conclude the University’s first Departmental million dollar endowment campaign.

We developed a strong undergraduate recruiting program and increased our undergraduate majors. We added new service courses at the undergraduate level. As well, we introduced the preparation of a grant proposal and an oral defense as part of our Ph.D. comprehensive examinations.

Our research and outreach activities increased culminating in the formation of a Strategic Research Alliance with Industry which currently has 26 member companies.

Following on the success of this first strategic plan we developed another in 1998 from which our current mission and strategic plan evolved. That plan, the 2001 Strategic Plan, which was approved and accepted by the College, follows. Although there may be some overlap we felt it important that the Strategic Plan be seen as a whole.

The 2001 Strategic Plan

The Department of Food Science is dedicated to the education of undergraduate, graduate and nontraditional students in the field of Food Science and the study and application of science and technology to further basic knowledge, add value, foster economic development and provide a safe, healthful and high quality food supply. It has eleven faculty including F. M. Clydesdale, the chair, and H. O. Hultin, Director of the Marine Station in Gloucester, 4 technicians, 1 2/3 bookkeepers and 2 secretaries in Amherst and one-half secretary and a professional staff person in Gloucester. It has a unique combination of teaching and research laboratories and a large pilot plant. Currently there are 32 graduate students, with a ratio of PhD: MS of approximately 2:1, 31 undergraduate majors and 10 Post Doctoral Fellows and/or Senior Visiting Scientists.

The Department is the major academic center for food science in New England and the only research- oriented department of its kind in Massachusetts. Its emphases since 1998, until now, were in the three broad areas of Food and Environmental Biotechnology, Physical-Chemical Properties of Food and Food Safety.

These areas and the resultant strength of our program have served us well as evidenced by the fact that we have 26 major food companies as paying members of our Strategic Research Alliance (SRA), a vital organization that provides an interface between the University and industry and optimizes technology transfer. We also have a strong alumni and an outstanding alumni Advisory Board who were responsible for the first Campaign at the University to raise one million dollars for a Food Science Endowment. In addition we have received funding of $1.5 million for an endowed chair and over $500K for a professorship to bring our development efforts to some $4 million over the last 10 years, plus another $500K from our Strategic Research Alliance (SRA) membership dues. These funds, combined with substantial on-going grant funding, which this year includes an IFAFS grant, 8 USDA NRI grants and a line item research grant for seafood safety from the Federal budget, have enabled us to be on the cutting edge of research with state of the art equipment.

The Department’s outstanding record in teaching, research and outreach has been recognized by faculty campus awards as well as many national and international awards which include being named the first Center of Excellence in Food Science by the United Nations Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO).

Vision

As we look to the future we must plan our focus based on a realistic assessment of not only our resources, but internal and external factors which must, of necessity, influence our decisions. In addition we will integrate faculty and resources such that faculty often take part in more than one area of emphasis.

After reviewing these factors we believe that the three broad areas selected in 1998 should continue, with a shift in emphasis in some cases. As well, we will be adding another area of emphasis, Health and Wellness, into which the expertise of the other areas can feed.

We will also be developing a distance learning MS program via compressed video which we intend to market to food companies. Further we plan to utilize our web site and the internet more frequently to make research findings available to our Alliance members and the technical community worldwide. Finally, we will be investigating the feasibility of developing a new area of emphasis in the application of science to food policy.

Food and Environmental Biotechnology

Food Biotechnology encompasses biological systems for modification and/or separation of whole organisms, tissues, cells, proteins and biological molecules, including DNA of plants, animals and microorganisms. We have been working in several internationally recognized areas within this framework, but will be shifting our emphasis to the development of novel plant tissue cultures, with a unique plant cell culture facility, and whole plant systems to study the synthesis of bioactive phenolic metabolites. These may be used for improving health, for disease prevention, or for pathogen control when they have bacteriostatic or bactericidal activity. This latter effort will be a key component of our shift into Seafood Safety which will be described more fully in the food Safety section.

Our program in Food Biotechnology forms a natural linkage with the University’s new initiative in genomics and the gene-enabled sciences. Clearly biotechnology provides a valuable continuum towards an end use for many aspects of genomics. The program will also continue to have teaching and research linkages with University-wide interdisciplinary programs. A graduate course in Food Biotechnology has been developed and we are planning on a University service course in Food Biology which will cover biotechnology in some detail. Currently several faculty are directly involved in Biotechnology/Bioprocessing research and teaching, while others offer support in areas such as enzymology and process engineering.

The research and teaching provide impetus for development of excellent outreach and economic development programs of distinction at both the national and international levels. The improvement of the nutritional and physiological benefits of food along with increasing yields are essential to meet the challenges of the 21st century. Outreach and service will be accomplished through the Strategic Research Alliance, while local economic development will be accomplished through companies such as Nourse Farms and the Marine Industries of Massachusetts.

The new hire we are proposing for our Health and Wellness section will provide a continuum from the development of bioactive ingredients to their evaluation and development as a key ingredient in functional foods.

Physical Chemical Properties of Food

This group employs the basic principles and instrumental techniques of the physical and chemical sciences to improve our understanding of complex food systems, thus enabling the production of longer lasting, higher quality, and safer foods. The faculty within this group have research and teaching programs in the areas of: molecular-structural basis of food properties; mechanical testing of foods; and development of technologies and functional, bioactive, food ingredients to improve the texture, appearance, taste and healthfulness of foods. Although these program will continue, there will be a shift in emphasis to bioactive functional foods in both research and teaching. In particular we will be offering a new course "The Nature of Food" which will interrelate food commodities with the most recent advances in food science, health and safety. This group is particularly well suited to create a stable, safe and acceptable food which contains a chemically active physiological component which may reduce the risk of disease. Obviously this shift will tie into the creation of our new Health and Wellness area. There is growing concern within the food industry about the lack of students with adequate training in the physical and chemical sciences. The faculty within this group will use their expertise in these areas to educate students in the applications of the basic sciences to food systems, and to gain the necessary problem-solving skills required by the modern food industry. In addition, they will continue to promote the development of an improved food supply by transferring their knowledge and skills to local, national and international food companies through outreach programs utilizing our pilot plant, when appropriate.

Because the basic chemical and physical sciences are at the foundation of this group, the group intends to build on its strong links with the Departments of Biochemistry, Biology, Chemistry, Chemical Engineering, Exercise Science, Nutrition, Mathematics and Statistics, and Polymer Science and Engineering.

Each faculty member in this group has established an internationally recognized research program and expertise not available elsewhere in the U.S. The continued success of our research programs in the physical-chemical properties of foods is dependent on the availability of state-of-the-art instrumentation required to characterize complex food materials. Hopefully, through a combination of SRA funds, external grants and partial matching funds from University sources, we will be able to fill this need. The group would also be strengthened by new faculty. Certainly the new Endowed Chair will work closely with this group but as retirements occur, possibly within the next 5 years, we will be looking to hire a new faculty member with expertise in the physical chemistry of macromolecules.

The Safety of Food

The area of food safety encompasses microbiological and toxicological problems related to the processing, handling, and consumption of food. The importance of microbial food safety issues was emphasized with the passage of the National Food Safety Initiative, one of the few high priority public health spending areas in the Federal budget. The Food Safety Group in the Food Science Department has the expertise to address and solve the problems associated with food processing and distribution and to teach graduate and undergraduate students the skills needed to solve persistent and future microbiological problems in the food industry. It will continue research related to the growth and detection of food borne pathogens and their toxins. Areas of emphasis will continue to include the development of sensitive and rapid detection methods, mathematical models to assess and predict microbiological hazards and use of natural products as bacteriostats or bactericides.

However, there will be a shift in emphasis with much of this research focused on Seafood Safety. We have had a line item in the Federal budget approved which will allow us to build a center of excellence in seafood safety and insure continued national and international prominence.

This group has both national and international collaborations. On a local level, our faculty participate in the University's interdisciplinary programs. In addition to departmental courses, faculty have offered off-campus courses in Food Microbiology to industry and have lectured on food safety issues at other universities. The Food Safety group will remain extensively involved with outreach and economic development activities, providing service to state industries and members of our SRA.

Provided the core group remains intact, no immediate requirements are foreseen for additional personnel. In the event of expansion, resignations or retirements, new faculty hires would be requested in the area of Food Biotechnology, Food Toxicology or other related areas to maintain or expand the critical balance necessary for research, teaching, and outreach programs. Ongoing needs for equipment and equipment maintenance will hopefully be met by a combination of external funds, endowments and University funds.

Health and Wellness

It is anticipated that our new emphasis in Health and Wellness will become an internationally recognized, federally funded, basic research program in functional foods covering such areas as: a) Utilization of biological models, including proteomics, to assess the molecular mechanisms and physiological effects of bioactive food components: b) Development of bioprocessing techniques to isolate bioactive compounds or produce novel health promoting foods that maintain desirable quality and safety over an extended shelf-life; c) characterize the molecular properties of novel food ingredients with health promoting activities. Although there is no official definition of functional foods, it is generally considered that they are a group of foods which provide physiological benefits beyond those traditionally expected from food. They represent some $9.2 billion in sales in the U.S. With this level of activity it is critical that we have a course in functional foods which would cover the science and regulation of this broad area of the marketplace for both our majors and students throughout the University.

Every food company, large or small, is interested in making a health claim for one of its existing products or discovering a new product or ingredient for which a claim can be made. Obviously this creates confusion at the least, and fraud at the worst, with the possibility of great health risk to the consumer. Therefore an active and viable program in outreach is absolutely essential in this area.

As was mentioned in previous sections, faculty and resources are available from two other areas of emphasis: Food Biotechnology and the Physical-Chemical Properties of Food. This new group would interact with Chemistry, Chemical Engineering, MCB, Polymer Science, Exercise Science, Nutrition and Veterinary and Animal Science. Further it would tie into the new University initiative in genomics as the study of bioactive foods will require investigating the roles of genes in response to dietary stimuli. Such efforts will provide linkages to the National Cancer Institute, other units at NIH, and USDA, which has begun a large investment in this area.

We hope to begin a search for a new faculty member in this area in the near future. Funds for salary will come from the F. J. Francis Endowment. Start up costs will be shared by the Department (SRA funds), the College and the University. As noted previously, both faculty and resources will be available from two other areas of emphasis to insure a viable and productive unit.

Goals

One year:

Five year:

 

Alignment Of The Strategic Plan To The College And University

This plan was developed in conjunction with the other Departments in the College and the Dean. Therefore its alignment to the College and the University is an integral part of its development.

The Department Within the Context of the College, the University and the Commonwealth

Department linkages with other University Departments are covered in the last section in the Strategic Plan 2001. In addition, our faculty teach or have recently taught courses in the Plant Biology Graduate Program and the Environmental Science Programs as well as participating as members of the University’s Molecular and Cell Biology, Plant Biology and Environmental Science Interdisciplinary Programs. Our faculty have lectured and/or given seminars in Chemistry, Polymer Science, Microbiology, Public Health and the Honors Program as well as holding adjunct appointments in Biology and Chemistry. The Department is active in the University Life Sciences (co-chairing its Steering Committee for two years) and the Lilly Fellows Teaching Program ( having 2 of our faculty selected as Lilly Fellows and serving on its Selection Committee). We taught an extremely successful off campus MS Program at Ocean Spray and graduated 17 students. Currently we are negotiating to teach a real time, via compressed video, MS program with several companies.

We have linkages with the Food Safety Initiative at the New England Medical Center, the Northeast Regional Food Safety Initiative, Tufts University, MIT and Harvard as well as with many institutions and University outside the Commonwealth. Both on campus and at the Marine Station in Gloucester we are committed to the value added food and marine industry in the State. Five members of our Strategic Research Alliance are in State, some half dozen companies have started in State utilizing our technology and many companies are benefiting (adding both jobs and dollars to their bottom line) with technological assistance from our faculty.

Student Enrollment and Recruiting

Our undergraduate and graduate curriculum is science-based rather than commodity based and therefore is directly in line with our goal to provide a continuum from the molecular to the applied in furthering basic knowledge, adding value, fostering economic development and providing a safe, healthful and high quality food supply.

At the graduate level we accept on average about 25% of the students who apply which ranks us as one of the most selective in the College.

At the undergraduate level we have a wonderful story to tell prospective students with 100% placement of our graduates and a solid science degree which is highly respected nationally and internationally. We have developed a multifaceted undergraduate recruiting program which has been ongoing over the last seven years. The overall recruiting strategy has been to focus upon undecided and declared Science Majors currently enrolled on the UMass, Amherst Campus. This has been attempted by development of additional undergraduate curricula and performing constant on-campus marketing.

Undergraduate Curriculum

The first stage of recruiting was to modify our undergraduate curriculum. The original curriculum Basic Food Science and Technology which meets the IFT requirement for a BS degree was kept intact. To date, this is still the most popular curriculum option for our undergraduates and students are strongly encouraged to enroll in this option. Since the goal of our undergraduate recruiting is to target current students on campus, the Undergraduate Planning Committee developed 2 other options, Food and Health and Food and the Environment (Health or Environment Option) to enable ease of transfer into our program and to provide diverse curricula for a wider undergraduate audience. The Food Health and Environment options have a more versatile curriculum than the Basic Food Science curriculum which allows students to take classes in their area of interest (usually in nutrition or environmental science). In addition, it builds upon the strong environmental science and public health programs at UMass.

Marketing the Food Science Major on campus

The department has used a multi-faceted approach to advertising our major on campus. This has included a mass mailing, color posters, table tents, and newspaper advertisements. For each recruiting activity, we have tried to monitor effectiveness, and we have come to the following conclusions:

  1. Most new Food Science majors can’t tell you where they first heard about the Department of Food Science, but they remember seeing information multiple times.
  2. In order to be effective, all recruiting activities must be performed every semester.

Each year, a mass mailing of a flyer and a return postcard are sent to all undecided majors (Freshman and Sophomores) and to all declared Biology, Chemistry, Microbiology, Biochemistry, Environmental Science, Nutrition, and Chem. Engineering Majors (Freshman, Sophomores and Juniors). This mailing is usually done both semesters, but the autumn mailing is performed before a large campus wide Major’s fair. The number of flyers sent varies from 2,500 — 5,000/semester. Return of response cards has been low (0.5 — 1%). This past Fall (2001) a new strategy was used. Rather than sending mailings in envelopes, post cards were sent with a brief definition of Food Science and referred them to the departmental web page. New sections of the web page were created to supply interested students with additional information about the department.

One of the best recruiting tools has been attending the Campus Major’s Fair. This occurs once a year during the fall semester. We time our mailings to arrive before this date and have invited students to attend and talk to us about the department. Some years we have given small gifts to students who bring in their flyer. For the Major’s Fair, we have developed a tabletop display describing food science and the inter-relationship of the scientific disciplines. We bring a variety of food products to show students and help to start conversations about Food Science. In addition to two faculty members, we bring one or two enthusiastic undergraduate students to help at this event. Undergraduates who have had industrial internships are very effective at recruiting. At this event, we have the opportunity to talk to students who have received our flyers, taken a general education course or heard about Food Science from one of our undergraduate majors.

Other on campus recruiting events include placing table tents in dormitory dining tables, as well as placing color posters in dorms, outside large auditoriums and on campus buses. The Department places advertisements in the Student Newspaper the week prior to pre- registration and arranges to play food science related videos on dormitory TV channels. In addition, the department teaches four large University service courses, and we will be adding two more, which exposes our major to a large number of students.

Recruiting Activities to High School Students

At every opportunity, the Department participates in campus events to expose high school students to our Food Science program. Faculty have participated in University- wide recruiting events (such as the Autumn Event), given talks and demonstrations to high school students with an interest in science at UMass Science Days, participated as judges at the Western Massachusetts Regional Science Fair, and given departmental tours to visiting 4-H students. In addition, the department sends information about Food Science and our Food Science program to all high school teachers who have used IFT materials and requested additional information, a total of over 30 teachers each year in the New England area.

For the future we will also investigate less traditional sources and means to recruit students and to build our undergraduate program. We plan to investigate recruiting at Culinary Institutes with the development of a chef/scientist program which would fit the needs of a large part of the Food Industry.

Further we will explore the possibility of establishing Food Science undergraduate programs at the other University of Massachusetts campuses (not Worcester) and maybe even one or two selected state colleges (e.g., Salem State, Framingham State). We might teach the Food Science courses electronically and deliver them to these schools. They would have the responsibility of seeing that the students got their supporting courses at the individual universities. There would be some problems with laboratories, but we could be flexible and investigate what was available in Microbiology and Chemistry. The major problem would be Food Processing which we would have to resolve. What kind of a degree they would get would have to be considered, as well as the institution that would be granting it and which Department would count these students as majors. With this latter idea we will initiate discussions with the administration prior to beginning development of any courses and/or a program.

Tables 1, 2 and 3 show Undergraduate and Graduate Enrollment, Degrees awarded by degree program level and Instruction to Majors and Non-Majors respectively.

Our undergraduate enrollment (Table 1) is actually higher in the spring (30-40 students) because most students transfer the end of fall semester while University data are calculated in the fall.

Department, College and University Committees

As well as being actively involved in the Interdisciplinary Programs and with other Departments, our faculty are equally involved in Committees within the department, the College and the University. Fortunately, we have a faculty who are cognizant of the necessity to take part in operations of the Department to insure its success. Within the department all faculty take part in one or more of the following committees: Undergraduate program committee, undergraduate recruiting committee, graduate program committee, pilot plant committee, personnel committee (peer election). In addition we have a faculty honors coordinator, a food safety extension representative, a building coordinator, a scheduling officer and a safety coordinator.

At the College level, over the past five years the faculty have served on the faculty development committee, the faculty fund raising campaign, the committee to develop USDA Hatch outcome statements; the College personnel committee, the College strategic planning committee and the College curriculum committee.

Over the same five years faculty have also been very active at the University level chairing the Graduate Dean’s review committee, the Faculty Senate service department review committee, the Life Sciences steering committee and the Provost’s revenue development committee. As well they served as members of the Life Sciences subcommittee on promotion and visibility, the Advisory Board for the United Asia Learning Resources Center, several subcommittees of University Science and Technology Advancement, the General Education task force, the Life Sciences subcommittee on program excellence, the search committee for a Vice President of research, the Program and Budget Council, the Foreign and International studies council, the academic priorities council, the advisory committee for the Mass Spectrophotometry Center, the Life Sciences technical staffing subcommittee, the Center for Teaching Lilly fellows selection committee and the Faculty Senate athletic council.

Promotion of Diversity

The Department of Food science has a long history of diversity and internationalism from its very beginning as the oldest Food science Department in the U.S.

Our faculty of eleven has two woman and two racial/ethnic lines. We, of course, work with the affirmative action office in the University to insure that we are doing everything in our power to attract minorities with each faculty search and we will continue that practice in the future.

At the undergraduate level as we recruit we have worked with CCEBMS (Committee for the Collegiate Education of Black and other Minority Students) and one of our faculty is a long standing member of the Advisory Board of UALRC (United Asia Learning Resource Center). In addition we work with Community Colleges and High Schools in recruiting minorities.

At the graduate level we currently contact all 1890 Universities to insure that their students are aware of opportunities in graduate school in our Department. We also work with any group that comes on campus to provide information. In addition we request from the University the ethnic/gender background of any graduate student who applies to our Department. We then review these applicants and this year nominated a student for a University Opportunity Fellowship which he received. We also receive names of students from the graduate school of any minority students interested in Food Science who we then contact.

As a Department we reaffirm the availability of civil rights training to faculty, staff and students and all our faculty are involved with recruitment at National and International meetings.

Students are encouraged to present seminars on research from their home Universities in other countries and as well we encourage diversity by working with other countries around the world. For instance we have had a USDA cooperative grant with a Mexican University to study Food Safety. We are working with Universities in Thailand on characterizing commodities physically and chemically as food ingredients.

We have held an International dinner in the department for some 50 years. In selecting guest speakers we attempt to maintain diversity and in our department committees we attempt to maintain gender and racial/ethnic representation including, of course, our search committees.

Contributions to Campus Wide Curricular Needs

Although we are a relatively small Department we are very proud of our commitment to the curricular needs of the campus. Some thirty years ago we offered one of the first General Education courses in Biological Science, Food Science 101. In addition we began, shortly thereafter, Food Science 102 an elective course for the campus community titled World Food Habits. Since that time we have added Food Science 150, The Science of Food, (both semesters) which satisfies a General Education, Biological Science requirement and Food Science 120, Food Preservation: Why and How which satisfies a General Education, Physical Science requirement. These courses enroll some 700 students per year.

After completing our departmental and University curricula reviews this past year we decided to develop two new courses which will begin in 2002/2003. One of these courses will address Concepts in Biotechnology and the other The Nature of Food. Both of these areas are not only of great interest but of great need for both the University and the Department and will be offered to Food Science majors and the University community at large. In total this provides six courses (two of which satisfy General Education requirements) and seven semesters of contributions to University curricular needs which we believe is a significant contribution from a Department of our size.

Current Standing and Goals for Future National Standing

Unfortunately Food Science along with many departments in Colleges of Agriculture are not ranked by the National Research Council, a situation which is currently being reviewed. As a result there is not a credible ranking source. For instance the Gormann Report purports to having a ranking system but last year they ranked MIT first. MIT has not had a Department of Food Science for about 25 years.

However, when one reviews Departments nationwide, their goals, objectives and how well these are met, our Department would certainly be included in the upper level. Our goal for future national standing is quite simple. We aim to be the top department of Food Science, in the areas we emphasize, in the Nation.


Table 1. Undergraduate and Graduate Enrollment (Food Science)


College of Food and Natural Resources

_______________

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

__________

__________

___________

 

2-Year

5-Year

10-Year

 

% Change

% Change

% Change

 

1991

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

00-01

96-01

91-01

_______________

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

__________

__________

___________

Undergraduate

 

Primary Major

25

21

19

17

15

27

34

39

29

22

27

-6.9%

0.0%

8.0%

Secondary Major

-

-

1

-

2

-

1

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

Subtotal

25

21

20

17

17

27

35

39

29

22

28

-3.4%

3.7%

12.0%

 

Master's

 

Active

18

31

31

27

17

17

16

7

9

9

9

-

-

-

Program Fee

4

5

7

2

12

4

8

4

7

2

5

-

-

-

Subtotal

22

36

38

29

29

21

24

11

16

11

14

-12.5%

-33.3%

-36.4%

 

Doctoral

 

Active

14

5

8

11

18

19

18

11

12

14

19

58.3%

0.0%

35.7%

Program Fee

5

13

9

11

7

7

10

17

10

10

4

-

-

-

Subtotal

19

18

17

22

25

26

28

28

22

24

23

4.5%

-11.5%

21.1%

 

All Graduate

 

Active

32

36

39

38

35

36

34

18

21

23

28

33.3%

-22.2%

-12.5%

Program Fee

9

18

16

13

19

11

18

21

17

12

9

-

-

-

Total

41

54

55

51

54

47

52

39

38

35

37

-2.6%

-21.3%

-9.8%

 

Total

66

75

75

68

71

74

87

78

67

57

65

-3.0%

-12.2%

-1.5%

_______________

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

__________

__________

___________

                               

Definitions and Notes
Primary Majors: The actual count of students whose primary major is in this department.
Secondary Majors: The actual count of students whose secondary or tertiary major is in this department.
Active: Graduate students registered for courses or dissertation/thesis credits.
Program Fee: Graduate students assigned three credits while on Program Fee (no course) status.
Total: The sum of primary anad secondary undergraduate majors and graduate total.
Undergraduate Total: Undergraduate total represents an unduplicated count of majors. Summing data for multiple departments may result in a duplicated headcount.
Note 1: For the purposes of this report, pre-majors are displayed with the corresponding major.
Note 2: All data reflect the organizational structure as of Fall 2001.
Note 3: Percent change is not calculated if Headcount Student Majors in the years being compared are less than ten.
Note 4: Secondary major is reported for undergraduate only.

Department Profiles -- University of Massachusetts Amherst -- Office of Institutional Research (OIR) -- Updated: 1/2/02


Table 2. Degrees Awarded by Degree Program Level (Food Science)

Academic Years 1992-93 through 2000-01

College of Food and Natural Resources

_______________

_______

_______

_______

_______

_______

_______

_______

_______

_______

_______

__________

__________

__________

 

2-Year

4-Year

8-Year

 

% Change

% Change

% Change

 

1992-93

1993-94

1994-95

1995-96

1996-97

1997-98

1998-99

1999-00

2000-01

98-01

96-01

92-01

_______________

_______

_______

_______

_______

_______

_______

_______

_______

_______

_______

__________

__________

__________

Undergraduate

 

Baccalaureate

5

7

7

2

6

10

7

12

5

-

-

-

Minors

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

 

Graduate

 

Master's

4

16

8

11

9

6

9

10

5

-

-

-

Doctoral

-

4

4

2

6

-

7

8

5

-

-

-

Total

4

20

12

13

15

6

16

18

10

-38%

-33%

150%

 

Total Degrees

9

27

19

15

21

16

23

30

15

-35%

-29%

67%

_______________

_______

_______

_______

_______

_______

_______

_______

_______

_______

_______

__________

__________

__________

                           

Definitions and Notes
Double Major: Students who complete the minimum credit hours to satisfy completion of a second major.
Minor: Minor programs allow the student to explore and attain some competence in a second area of study without fulfilling the full range of requirements of the major. At least 15 credits in a coherent set of courses in a particular discipline, department, or program are required.

Note 1: Baccalaureate degrees awarded include double degrees.
Note 2: Double majors and minors are not counted in the degree totals.
Note 3: All data reflect the organizational structure. Historical data have been adjusted to reflect the changes.
Note 4: Degrees awarded include programs administered by the Division of Continuing Education.
Note 5: Percent change is not calculated if the average number of degrees or minors is less than 10.
Note 6: Includes September, February, and May graduation dates.
Note 7: The Department of Food Science and Nutrition became two different departments in 1989.

Department Profiles -- University of Massachusetts Amherst -- Office of Institutional Research (OIR) -- 11/15/01


Table 3. Instruction to Majors and Non-Majors (Food Science)

Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) Instructed Students

Fall Semester, 1991-2001

College of Food and Natural Resources

_______________

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

__________

__________

___________

 

2-Year

5-Year

10-Year

 

% Change

% Change

% Change

 

1991

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

99-01

96-01

91-01

_______________

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

__________

__________

___________

Undergraduate

 

Majors

8.5

11.8

7.7

7.2

5.8

10.4

17.5

9.6

11.9

6.5

12.2

2.5%

17.3%

-

Non-Majors

45.3

43.1

67.2

80.2

112.3

110.3

119.5

105.0

115.5

80.7

77.5

-32.9%

-29.8%

71.0%

% Non-Majors

84%

79%

90%

92%

95%

91%

87%

92%

91%

93%

86%

     

Total

53.8

54.9

74.9

87.4

118.1

120.7

137.0

114.6

127.4

87.2

89.7

-29.6%

-25.7%

66.7%

 

Graduate

 

Majors

30.1

30.0

38.4

30.3

33.0

32.0

30.6

22.4

19.0

23.0

25.3

33.3%

-20.8%

-15.8%

Non-Majors

0.8

2.0

2.4

3.9

1.8

2.1

0.4

1.3

0.4

0.8

0.9

-

-

-

% Non-Majors

3%

6%

6%

11%

5%

6%

1%

5%

2%

3%

3%

     

Total

30.9

32.0

40.8

34.2

34.8

34.1

31.0

23.7

19.4

23.8

26.2

35.2%

-23.1%

-15.1%

 

Total

 

Majors

38.6

41.8

46.1

37.5

38.8

42.4

48.1

32.0

30.9

29.5

37.5

21.5%

-11.5%

-2.8%

Non-Majors

46.1

45.1

69.6

84.1

114.1

112.4

119.9

106.3

115.9

81.5

78.4

-32.4%

-30.3%

70.0%

% Non-Majors

54%

52%

60%

69%

75%

73%

71%

77%

79%

73%

68%

     

Total

84.7

86.9

115.7

121.6

152.9

154.8

168.0

138.3

146.8

111.0

115.9

-21.1%

-25.1%

36.8%

_______________

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

__________

__________

___________

                               

Definitions and Notes
FTE Instructed Students: Credits generated in the courses offered by each program are divided by a "full-time" load to calculate full-time equivalency. For undergraduate courses, a full-time load is 15 credit hours. For graduate courses, a full-time load is 9 credit hours. For courses numbered 500-599, full-time equivalency depends on the level of the student: if undergraduate, divide by 15; if graduate, divide by 9.
Instruction to Majors: Instruction consumed by students with any declared major (including multiple majors) in the department. Pre-majors are counted as majors.
Instruction to Non-Majors: Instruction consumed by students with no declared major or with a declared major in another department.
Change: Percent change is not calculated in FTE's if the years being compared is less than ten.
Note 1: Includes FTE's generated in programs administered through Continuing Education at the graduate level.
Note 2: All data reflect the organizational structure as of Fall 2001.

Department Profiles -- University of Massachusetts Amherst -- Office of Institutional Research (OIR) -- 1/8/02


 

FACULTY, QUALITY AND PRODUCTIVITY

Department Planning for Effectiveness

In the late nineteen eighties and early nineties the University and the department underwent a faculty consolidation. At that time we developed our first Strategic Plan with the understanding that our faculty base would be considerably smaller. We were fortunate to be able to plan for four new hires and we decided that these faculty positions would be allocated into areas of emphasis where we believed we would excel given the expertise of our remaining faculty, State, National and International needs and our predictions for the future of Food Science being based on safety, health and quality. This meant difficult choices for us and the reallocation of resources, giving up an emphasis in such areas as sensory analysis, packaging, dairy and meat science, and pigment chemistry. However, we decided that an outstanding Department of Food Science cannot address every issue in the food science spectrum but instead must focus its resources. Further we believed that areas of excellence must have a science base, be relevant, realistic and fundable.

We therefore decided to fill two of the new positions with hires that would create an area of emphasis in the physical-chemical properties of food, when added to our present faculty. One of these would specialize in lipids and oxidation chemistry given the key role of lipids and oxidation reactions in food, quality and health. This position would build on an outstanding history in lipid chemistry and the internationally recognized work of Dr. Hultin and Dr. Nawar in oxidation and lipid chemistry and allow us to build a center of excellence in teaching, research and outreach. The second position was to be a specialist in food biopolymers and physical properties. This position along with the interests of our present faculty and the expertise of Dr. Peleg and Dr. Chinachoti would allow us to develop a strong, vital area for the future. This area would entail teaching, research and outreach in the modification and identification of food biopolymers such as proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, phenolics and other natural compounds to produce new functional, nutritional and prophylactic ingredients and/or develop restructured foods whose final form might bear little resemblance to the raw materials from which they were produced. It was expected that the great strength and international repute of the University's Polymer Science Program, would greatly aid in the development of these areas as we developed joint partnerships.

As we looked to the future it is obvious that we will use foods and components of foods (often polymers) to ward off disease. Further, the capacity to tailor polymers to specific physical properties is a critical need in production of engineered foods, for example, meat-type products from fish and soybeans. As well, understanding the molecular basis and control of colloids and emulsions along with their non destructive characterization will allow the development of new foods and on line measurement techniques.

The Physical-Chemical Properties area would also dovetail with biotechnology and our new area of emphasis in Health and Wellness as described in the Strategic Plan in the last section. In total we believed that these hires would provide a synergy to optimize the emphasis we are seeking on value added ingredients and the production of healthy, high quality and nutritious foods.

Our third hire was to be in the area of biotechnology. Although we have several faculty whose research is involved with biotechnology we had no individual whose efforts served as a focal point for a world class program in biotechnology. As much as possible we were interested in a top scientist who could network both on campus (within our Department, MCB, ES, Plant Biology, etc.) and off campus (outreach to Industry and Universities national and internationally). Further we did not want to concentrate on transgenics since this area would require huge start up costs and we still wouldn't be competitive in this area. Our interests resided in the utilization of biotechnology to act in synergy with our other efforts in value adding and the production of healthy, high quality and nutritious foods and ingredients to reduce the risk of disease.

The last position necessary to fulfill the staffing requirements of the plan was a hire in Food Safety. This hire would conduct research on the detection and interactions of bacteria with food utilizing the contemporary tools of biology as well as developing food microbiology courses and outreach efforts incorporating research knowledge, regulatory and safety concerns and applied control techniques. As in the case of our other hires this was an ambitious agenda and would require an individual whose interests spanned the continuum from the molecular to the applied and who would interact with our own faculty in this area as well as those in other Departments both on and off campus.

As noted previously our four new hires and their individual and collective effort on the Department in teaching, research and service exceeded our wildest expectations. As a result of these hires funding (from all sources), publications, degrees awarded, course offerings and outreach have all increased significantly. Further our collective faculty, with the new hires ensured the scientific expertise to assure effective curriculum development.

To improve our abilities in instructional design and delivery and the evaluation of outcomes some faculty have availed themselves of the resources of the University’s Center for Teaching. Two of our faculty were selected as Lilly Teaching Fellows, others serve on the Department Undergraduate Program Committee and/or the College Curriculum Committee, a Faculty member served on as a panelist on a Cross Cultural Teaching Workshop while still others participated in a weekend North East Regional Teaching Workshop.

Table 4 illustrates some of the academic accomplishments of our faculty over the last decade. The accomplishments shown in Table 4 clearly indicate that the faculty are current in relation to the knowledge base and content of the discipline, as judged by their peers and therefore, by extension, with Departmental curricular offerings.

Table 4. Selected academic accomplishments of the

Food Science Faculty over the last decade.

 

Publications

Peer Reviewed Papers

Abstracts

Published Proceeding

Books and Monographs

Book Chapters

1991-92

57

34

7

0

12

1992-93

43

18

4

1

2

1993-94

50

20

10

2

3

1994-95

45

39

10

4

4

1995-96

62

28

19

6

4

1996-97

55

38

6

4

7

1997-98

52

52

9

2

11

1998-99

65

45

5

1

9

1999-00

83

30

9

4

19

2000-01

54

55

10

3

8

________________________________________________________________________

Faculty Background, Experience and Credentials

An abbreviated C.V. for each faculty member follows to illustrate their background, experience and credentials. Full C.V.’s and publications may be found on our web site at http://www.umass.edu/foodsci/.

 

PAVINEE CHINACHOTI

Affiliation: Professor of the Department of Food Science

Education: BS, Mahidol University, 1979; MS and PhD, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign,1983, 1986

Position: Assistant/Associate/Professor, University of Massachusetts, Amherst 1986-present

Selected Honors and Awards

Lilly Teaching Fellow

CFNR Outstanding Advisor Award

Outstanding Professor Award (Eastern Food Conference XI)

University and Professional Service and Outreach

Institute of Food Technologists (IFT), American Association of Cereal Chemistry

Past Editorial Board Member ASEAN Food Journal, J. of Food Process Engineering

Past Chair Committee on Education, IFT

Chair, Long-Range Planning sub-committee, Food Chemistry Division, IFT

Life Science Steering Committee (LSSC), General Education Task Force Committee member,

Science Technology Advancement sub-committee

VP for Research Search Committee

Advisory Board for UALRC (United Asia Learning Resource Center)

Graduate Dean Performance Review Chair

Food industry outreach activities through food processing technology and use of Pilot Plant

Team Leader — Autonomous University Reform Assistance to Thailand

Grants (last 5 years)

USDA Competitive Research Grant, (with 3 others) 92/98, $271,767

Dairy Management Inc., (with 3 others) 96/98, $120,806

DOD, US Army Natick Lab 95/01, $220,818

S-K (NOAA), (with 3 others) 2000-01 $126,196

Research Interests

Molecular dynamics of water in foods and its impact on microbiological, chemical, and physical stability in food systems. Food shelf-life extension: controlling spoilage and pathogenic microorganisms by moisture control plasticization of food biopolymers and small carbohydrates (phase transition), encapsulation of lipids as a means to prolong oxidative changes, water activity and food stability.

Selected Publications (last 5 years, 75 total publications)

Vittadini, E., Dickinson, L.C. and Chinachoti, P. 2001. 1H and 2H NMR mobility in cellulose. Carbohydrate

Polymers 46:49-57.

Ponginebbi, L., Nawar, W.W. and Chinachoti, P. 2000. Effect of physical properties on lipid oxidation in freeze

dried emulsions. Grassy Y Aceites 51 (5): 348-354.

Hardas, N., Danviriyakul, S., Foley, J.L., Nawar, W.W., and Chinachoti, P. 2000. Accelerated stability studies of

microencapsulated anhydrous milkfat. Lebensmittel-Wissenschaft und —Technologie (LWT) 33(7):506-513.

Baik, M.-Y. and Chinachoti, P. 2000. Moisture redistribution and phase transition during bread staling. Cereal

Chem. 77(4):484-488.

Vodovotz, Y., Dickinson, L.C. and Chinachoti, P. 2000. Molecular characterization around glassy transition of

starch using 1H cross relaxation NMR. J. Agric. and Food Chem. 48(10); 4948-4954.

Hallberg, L.M. and Chinachoti, P. 1992. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis for Glass Transitions in Long-Shelf-life

Bread. J. Food Sci. 57:1201

 

FERGUS M. CLYDESDALE

Affiliations: Professor and Head of the Department of Food Science

Education: BA, University of Toronto, 1960; MA, 1962, Ph.D., University of Massachusetts, Amherst, 1966

Positions: Scientist, Defense Medical Research, Toronto, 1962; Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, 1966-67; Assistant/Associate/Professor, University of Massachusetts 1967-present

Selected Honors and Awards

Univ. of Massachusetts Distinguished Teacher Award , IFT William V. Cruess Award for Excellence in teaching, Babcock Hart Award for research in Public Health, Donald K. Tressler Award for Outstanding Contributions to Food Science, Nicholas Appert Award to honor contributions to the field of Food Technology and the Carl R. Fellers Award. Fellow of both the American College of Nutrition and the Institute of Food Technologists

University and Professional Service and Outreach

Chair, Food Science Department, 1989-present, Director, Food Science Strategic Research Alliance, 1996-present

Co-Chair, University Life Science Steering Committee, 1996-98

Chair, Provost’s Committee on Revenue Department, 2001

Editor, Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition

Chair, Board of Trustees, ILSI NA

Chair, Food Forum of the Food and Nutrition Board of the Institute of Medicine National Academy of Sciences, 1996-1998, Reappointed 1998-2001, Reappointed 2001-2002

Member, Food Advisory Committee of the Food & Drug Administration, 1994-1998

Member, Food and Nutrition Board of the Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences, 1994-1997. Reappointed 1997-2000

Grants (last 5 years)

Coca Cola Foundation, P.I. Food Science/Policy/Acceptance 97-01, $95,500

USDA, Co PI with 5 others and a PI, Seafood Safety, 99-01, $495,023

Strategic Research Alliance, 97-01, $625,000

Research Interests

Investigation of the physicochemical and sensory characteristics of nutrients and other components in food which effect their bioavailability, physiological role and functional suitability in foods. Maximizing the role of science in establishing food policies and regulations.

Selected Publications (last 5 years, 359 total publications)

Berner, L.A., Clydesale, F.M. and Douglass, J.S. 2001. Fortification contributed greatly to vitamin and mineral

intakes in the US, 1989-91, J. Nutr. 131:2177-2183.

Baublis, A.J., Chongrun, L., Clydesdale, F.M. and Decker, E.A. 2001. Potential of wheat based cereals as a source

of dietary antioxidants. J.Am. Coll. Nutr. 19(3), 308S-311S.

Chantrapornchai, W., Clydesdale, F.M. and McClements, D.J. 2001. Influence of flocculation on optical properties

of emulsions. J. Food Sci. 66 (3): 464-469.

Baublis, A., Clydesdale, F.M. and Decker, E.A. 2000. Antioxidants in wheat-based breakfast cereals. Cereal Foods

World. 45 (2), 71-74.

Baublis, A., Decker, E.A. and Clydesdale, F.M. 2000. Antioxidant effect of aqueous extracts from wheat based

ready-to-eat cereals. Food Chem. 68:1-6.

Chantrapornchai, W., Clydesdale, F.M. and McClements, D.J. 2000. Optical properties of oil-in-water emulsions

containing titanium dioxide particles. Colloids and Sur. 166:123-131.

Yoshie, Y., Suzuki, T., Pandolf, T. and Clydesdale, F.M. 1999. Solubility of iron and zinc in selected seafoods

under simulated gastrointestinal conditions. Food Sci. Tech. Res. 5, (21, 140-144).

Clydesdale, F.M. 1998. Science, Education and Technology: New Frontiers for Health. Crit. Rev. Fd. Sci. Nutr.

38:(5), 397-419.

Clydesdale, F.M. 1997. A proposal for the establishment of scientific criteria for health claims for functional foods.

Nutr. Rev. 55:(12), 413-422.

ERIC ANDREW DECKER

Affiliation: Professor of the Department of Food Science

Education: BS, Pennsylvania State University, 1982; MS, Washington State University, 1985; PhD, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, 1989

Positions: Assistant Professor, Department of Animal Sciences, University of Kentucky, 1989-1993; Associate/Professor, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, 1993-present

Selected Honors and Awards

Elected American Meat Science Association Board of Directors; Institute of Food Technologists Distinguished Lecturer ; Outstanding Teaching Award, College of Food and Natural Resources, University of Massachusetts; Samuel Cate Prescott Award, Institute of Food Technologists; Young Scientist Award, Agriculture and Food Chemistry Division, ACS; Achievement Award for Young Scientists, American Meat Science Society

University and Professional Service and Outreach

Research Com., Institute of Food Technologists (1999-2002), Contributing Ed, Nutrition Reviews (1994-Present)

Associate Editor, Current Protocols in Food Analytical Chem., John Wiley & Sons (1998-Present)

Advisory Panel Member for TSE in Food Lipids, Food and Drug Administration (1998)

Advisory Board for International Collaborative Doctoral Degreee Program, Thailand (1999-present)

Chairman, Muscle Food Div., IFT (1994-95), Member & Chair, Committee Sections & Divisions, IFT (1995-98)

Grants (last 5 years)

USDA-IFAFS, 9/15/01-9/14-05, $1,722,000; USDA-NRI 10/15/01-8/31/04, $185,000

USDA-NRI, 9/1/99-8/31/02, $140,000

National Cattlemen’s Beef Assoc., 9/1/99-8/31/01, $46,272

Research Interests

Role of lipid oxidation in health and food quality. Characterization of the molecular mechanisms of antioxidants. Role of bioactive lipids in disease

Selected Publications (last 5 years, 118 total publications)

Brannan, R.G. and Decker, E.A. 2001. Peroxynitrite-induced oxidation of lipids: Implications for Muscle Foods J.

Agric. Food Sci. 49:3074-3079

Carr, A.C., Decker, E.A., Park, Y.J. and Frei, B. 2001. Comparison of low-density lipoprotein modification by

hypochlorous and hypobromous acids. Free Rad. Med. Biol. 31:62-72.

Sigfusson, H., Decker, E.A. and McClements, D.J. 2001. Ultrasonic Characterization of Atlantic Mackerel (Scomber

scombrus). Food Res. Intl. 34:15-23.

Decker, E.A., Ivanov, V., Zhu, B.Z., and Frei, B. 2001. Inhibition of low density lipoprotein oxidation by carnosine

and histidine. J. Agric. Food Chem. 49:511-516.

Livisay, S.A., Zhou, S., Ip, C. and Decker, E.A. 2000. Impact of Dietary Conjugated Linoleic Acid on the Oxidative

Stability of Rat Liver Microsomes and Skeletal Muscle Homogenates. J. Agric. Food Chem. 48:4162-4167.

Sacheck, J.M., Decker, E.A. and Clarkson, P.M. 2000. The effect of diet on vitamin E intake and oxidative stress in

response to acute exercise in female athletes. Eur. J. Applied Physiol. 83:40-46.

Decker, E.A., Zhou, S. and Livisay, S.A. 2000. A Re-Evaluation of the Antioxidant Activity of Purified Carnosine

Biochemistry (Moscow) 65:766-770.

Baublis, A.J., Lu, C., Clydesdale, F.M. and Decker, E.A. 2000. Potential of Wheat-Based Breakfast Cereals as a

Source of Dietary Antioxidants. J. Amer. Coll. Nutr. 19:308S-311S.

Chaiyasit, W., Silvestre, M.P.C., McClements, D.J. and Decker, E.A. 2000. Ability of surfactant tail group size to

alter lipid oxidation in oil-in-water emulsions. J. Agric. Food Chem. 48:3077-3080.

Tong, L.M., Sasaki, S., McCelements, D.J. and Decker, E.A. 2000. Mechanisms of Antioxidant Activity of a High

Molecular Weight Fraction of Whey. J. Agric. Food Chem. 48:1473-1478.

Silvestre, M.P.C., Chaiyasit, W., Brannan, R.G., McClements, D.J. and Decker, E.A. 2000. Ability of Surfactant

Head Group Size to Alter Lipid and Antioxidant Oxidation in Oil-in-Water Emulsions. J Ag Fd Chem 48:2057-61.

HERBERT O. HULTIN

Affiliation: Professor of the Department of Food Science

Education: BS, MS and PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1956 and 1959; NIH post-doctoral fellow, Institute for Enzyme Research, University of Wisconsin/Madison, 1962-63.

Positions: University of Massachusetts/Amherst, Assoc. Professor, 1963-1969; Assistant Professor, 1959-63; Visiting Lecturer, MIT, 1979-1983; Visiting Professor, Univ. of Guelph, 1982; Visiting Professor, Univ. of California/Davis, 1984; Professor, Associated Graduate Faculty, University of Guelph, 1991-present. University of Massachusetts/Amherst, Professor; Director, University of Massachusetts Marine Station

Selected Honors and Awards

Honorary Societies - Phi Lamba Upsilon, Sigma Xi, Phi Tau Sigma; S.C. Prescott Research Award of the Institute of Food Technologists, 1968; Earl P. McFee Award of the Atlantic Fisheries Technologists, 1985; Fellow Award, American Chemical Society, Division of Agriculture and Food Chemistry, 1988; Fellow Award, Institute of Food Technologists, 1989; Institute of Food Technologists Philadelphia Section Lectureship Award, 1991; University of Wisconsin PEGG Award, 1992; Outstanding Professor Award, Eastern Food Science Conference, 1995; First Invited Divisional Lecturer, Institute of Food Technologists Food Chemistry Division, 1996; Invited Divisional Lecturer, Institute of Food Technologists Seafood Technology Division, 2001.

University and Professional Service and Outreach

American Chemical Society, Institute of Food Technologists, AAAS, Atlantic Fisheries Technologists, Oxygen Society, International Society for Free Radical Research, Japanese Society for Scientific Fisheries, Pacific Fisheries Technologists, International Society of Food Physicists.

Grants (last 5 years)

USDA NRICPG, 94-97, $140,000

MIT Sea Grant College Program, 95-97, $76,500 98-00, $96,000, 00-02, $124,000

USDA NRICGP, 97-00, $145,000

Gorton’s of Gloucester, 98, $3,800

Safety Associates, Inc., 98, $5,000

USDA NRICGP, 99-00, $160,000;

USDA NRICGP, 00-03, $50,367

National Fisheries Institute, 2000, $5,000

Research interests

Physical and functional properties of muscle proteins; lipid oxidation in food tissues; enzymes in food processing.

Selected Publications (from 5 years, 204 total publications)

Richards, M.P. and Hultin, H.O. 2001. Rancidity development in a fish model system as affected by phospholipids.

J. Food Lipids 8, 215-230.

Feng, Y. and Hultin, H.O. 2001. Effect of pH on the rheological and structural properties of gels of water-washed

chicken breast muscle at physiological ionic strength. J. Agric. Food Chem. 49, 3927-3935.

Chang, H.-S., Hultin, H.O. and Dagher, S.M. 2001. Effect of MgCl2/sodium pyrophosphate on chicken breast

muscle myosin solubilization and gelation. J. Food Biochem. 25, 459-474.

Chang, H.-S., Feng, Y. and Hultin, H.O. 2001. Role of pH in gel formation of washed chicken muscle at low ionic

strength. J. Food Biochem. 25, 439-457.

Kelleher, S.D., Livingston, M.B., Hultin, H.O. and Aciukewicz, T. 2001. Characteristics and storage stability of

Atlantic hagfish. J. Aquat. Food Prod. Technol. 10 (4), 101-118.

Dagher, S.M., Hultin, H.O. and Liang, Y. 2000. Solubility of cod muscle myofibrillar proteins at alkaline pH. J.

Aquat. Food Prod. Technol. 9 (4), 49-59.

Richards, M.P. and Hultin, H.O. 2000. Effect of pH on lipid oxidation using trout hemolysate as a catalyst: a

possible role for deoxyhemoglobin. J. Agric. Food Chem. 48, 3141-3147.

Soyer, A. and Hultin, H.O. 2000. Kinetics of oxidation of the lipids and proteins of cod sarcoplasmic reticulum. J.

Agric. Food Chem. 48, 2127-2134.

RONALD G. LABBE

Affiliation: Professor, Department of Food Science

Education: BS, University of New Hampshire, 1968; MS, University of Wisconsin, 1970; PhD, University of Wisconsin, 1976

Positions: Assistant/Associate/Professor, University of Massachusetts, 1976-present.

Selected Honors and Awards

Fellow, American Academy of Microbiology

University and Professional Service and Outreach

Academic Priorities Council, Program and Budget Council

Foreign and International studies Council

Provided in-person assistance to 2 Massachusetts companies; Sterilizer Company, Maple Sugar Producer

Many phone calls.

Local organizing committee for 4th International Conference on the Pathogenesis and Molecular Biology of the Clostridia; Editorial Board Member of Journal of Food Protection, and ad hoc reviewer for many journals.

Grants (last 5 years)

USDA-NRI 10/97-9/02, $176,000

American Meat Institute (with 1 other), 10/00-9/02, $54,500

USDA, Seafood Safety, (with 5 others) 99-01, $495,023

Research Interest

Microbial food safety with emphasis on physiology of Clostridium perfringens and other spore-forming bacteria; use of natural products as anti-microbial agents.

Selected Publications (last 5 years, 69 total publications)

Heredia, N. and Labbe, R. 2001. Clostridium perfringens in: R. Labbe and S. Garcia (eds.), Guide to Foodborne

Pathogens, pgs 133-141. John Wiley & Sons, New York.

Labbe, R., Kinsley, M. and Wu. J. 2001. Limitations in the use of ozone to disinfect maple sap. J. of Food

Protection. 64: 104-107.

Kim, S. Labbe, R. and Ryu, S. 2000. Inhibitory effects of collagen on the polymerase chain reaction for the

detection of Clostridium perfringens. Applied and Environmental Microbiology. 66: 1213-1215.

Tseng, W.J. and Labbe, R. 2000. Characteristics of a sporulation stimulating factor from Clostridium perfringens.

Letters in Applied Microbiology 30: 254-257.

Labbe, R. 2000. Clostridium perfringens. In: The Microbiology of Food. B. Lund, A.C. Baird-Parker, and G.Gould

(eds.) vol II,pg. 1110-1135, Aspen Publishers Inc., Gaithersburg, Maryland.

Heredia, N., Labbe, R. and Garcia, J.S. 1999. Alteration in sporulation, enterotoxin-production and protein synthesis

by Clostridium perfringens type A following heat shock. Journal of Food Protection. 61: 1143-1147.

Shetty, K. and Labbe, R. 1998. Foodborne pathogens, health and role of dietary phytochemicals. Asia Pacific J. of

Clinical Nutrition. 7: 270-276.

Rodriguez-Romo, L., Heredia, N., Labbe, R., Garcia, J.S. 1998. Detection of enterotoxigenic Clostridium

perfringens in spices used in Mexico by dot blotting using a DNA probe. J. of Food Protection. 61: 201-204.

Heredia, N., Garcia, G., Luevanos, R., Labbe, R. and Garcia, J.S. 1997. Elevation of the heat resistance of vegetative

cells and spores of Clostridium perfringens type A by sub-lethal heat shock. J. of Food Protection. 60;998-1000.

Labbe, R. and Shih, R. 1997. Physiology of sporulation of the Clostridia. In: Molecular Biology and Pathogenesis

of the Clostridia. J. Rood, B. McClane, G. Songer, and R. Titball (eds.) p. 21-34, Academic Press.

ROBERT E. LEVIN

Affiliations: Professor, Department of Food Science, member Environmental Science Program

Education: BS, Biological Science, Los Angeles State College, 1952; MS, Bacteriology, University of Southern California, 1954; PhD, Microbiology, University of California, Davis, 1963

Positions: Assistant Professor, Department of Microbiology, Oregon State University 1963-1964 Assistant/Associate/Professor, University of Massachusetts, 1964-present

Selected Honors and Awards

Member NSF Predoctoral Biomedical Review Panel (1993-1995), presently USDA. Univ. Maryland and NYU Sea Grant reviewer, and NOAA external reviewer. Member Editorial Boards of J. Food Biochemistry (1985-1995),

J. Food Safety , and J. Food Protection. Presently reviewer of manuscripts for J. Food Sci.

University and Professional Service and Outreach

Member Dept. undergrad recruiting committee, Member Dept. Personnel Committee

Chairman Dept. Analytical Services Committee, Chairman Faculty Senate Service Department's Committee

Chairman Environmental Science Curriculum Committee, Member Environmental Science Steering Committee

Consultant to Bioxy Corp regarding fish and meat preservation with sodium chlorite in ice

Consultant to Drumme Corp. regarding spoilage problems of fish hydrolysates.

Grants (last five years)

USDA, Seafood Safety Project (P.I. with 5 additional co-PI’s) 99-01, $495,023

Two Chinese Post Docs with support funds, 02, $24,000

PhD Student from Thailand, 02-03, $8,000

Research Interests

Psychrotrophic food spoilage microorganisms and obligately psychrotrophic bacteriophage, detection of mutagens and carcinogens in foods. Mechanisms of DNA repair, fish protein hydrolysates, industrial fermentations, immunological and PCR detection of food pathogenic bacteria. Microbial degradation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons. Low pH growth of E. coli O157:H7, quorum-response among enteric organisms, fish preservation.

Selected publications (last 5 years, 89 total publications)

Ferenc, J., Oliver, J., Witkowski, R., McLandsborough, L. and Levin, R.E. 2000. Studies on the growth of

Escherichia coli 0157:H7 strains at 45 deg C. J. Food Protection. 63:1173-1178.

Abolmaaty, A, Vu, C., Oliver, J. and R.E. Levin. 2000. Development of a new lysis solution for releasing genomic

DNA from bacterial cells for DNA amplification by polymerase chain reaction. Microbio. 101:181-189.

Pham, X., Vittadini, E., Levin, R. E. and Chinachoti, P. 1999. Role of water mobility on mold spore germination. J.

Agric. Food Chem. 44:4976-4983.

Zheng, Z., Levin, R.E., Pinkham, J.L., and Shetty, K. 1998. Decolorization of polymeric dyes by a novel

Penicillium isolate. Process Biochem. 33:1-7.

Mohamed, Abolmaasty, A., El-Shemy, M.G. Khallag, M.F. and Levin, R.E. 1998. Effect of lysing methods and

their variables on the yield of Escherichia coli O157:H7 DNA and its PCR amplification. J. Microbiol.

Methods. 34: 133-141.

Abolmaaty, A. and Levin, R.E. 1998. Effect of Lysing Methods and their Variables on the yield of Escherichia coli

O157:H7 DNA and its amplification. Microbiol. Methods. 34:I133-141.

Abolmaaty, A, Levin, R.E., and Abdallah, M.A. 1997. Development of a spectrophotometric immuno-agglutination

assay for quantitatation of IgG for Escherichia coli O157. Microbio. 91:37-46.

Cao, H., Giurca, R., and Levin, R.E. 1997. Continuous propionic acid fermentation of hydrolyzed Cod (Gadus

morhua ) gurry. J. Food Biochem. 21:371-382.

Dantzer, W.R. and Levin, R.E. 1997. Bacterial influence on the production of paralytic shellfish toxins by

dinoflagellated algae. J. Appl. Microbiol. 83:464-469.

El-Shemy, M.G. and Levin, R.E. 1997. Characterization of affinity-purified trypsin from hybrid tilapia (Tilapia

nilotica/aurea). J. Food Biochem. 21:163-175.

RAYMOND R. MAHONEY

Affiliation: Professor of Food Science (Food Chemistry)

Education: BS, University of Reading (UK), 1967; MS and PhD University of California/Davis, 1968, 1976

Positions: Assistant/Associate/ Professor, University of Massachusetts 1977-present

Selected Honors and Awards

Heritage Fund Lecturer, University of Alberta, 1989

Visiting Professor, University of The West Indies, 1997-present

University and Professional Service and Outreach

External Examiner, University of the West Indies and University of Mysore, India.

Science Advisory Board Member, Nexia Biotechnology, Quebec, Canada.

Chair, Committees on Constitution & Bye-Laws and on Governance, Institute of Food Technologists, Chicago.

Chair, College Curriculum Committee, College of Food and Natural Resources.

Grants (last 5 years)

Nutratech Inc. Research in enzymology $5,500.

Research Interests

Food biochemistry and enzymology Iron - protein interactions which affect bioavailability. Chemistry and applications of enzymes and enzyme inhibitors in foods, especially lactases and polygalacturonase inhibitors.

Selected Publications (last 5 years, 54 total publications)

Vattem, D.A., Seth, A. and Mahoney, R.R. 2001. Chelation and reduction of iron by chicken muscle protein

digests: the role of sulfhydryl groups. J. Sci. Fd. Agric. 81:1-5.

Seth, A. and Mahoney, R.R. 2000. Iron chelation by digests of insoluble chicken muscle protein: the role of

histidine residues. J. Sci. Fd. Agric. 81:183-187.

Seth, A. and Mahoney, R.R. 2000. Solubilization of iron by chicken muscle protein digests: the size of the iron

binding peptides. J. Sci. Fd. Agric. 80:1595-1600.

Seth, A., Diza, M. and Mahoney, R.R. 1991. Iron solubilization by chicken muscle protein digests. J. Sci. Fd.

Agric. 79:1958-1963.

Mahoney, R.R. 1999. Enzymology in Wiley Encyclopedia of Food Science and Technology (F.J. Francis, ed)

Wiley, New York, pp 658-661.

Mahoney, R.R. 1999. Immobolized Enzymes in Wiley Encyclopedia of Food Science and Technology (F.J.

Francis, ed) Wiley, New York, pp 1342-1345

Huang, L.K. and Mahoney, R.R. 1999. Purification and characterization of an endopolygalacturonase from

Verticillium alboatrum. J. Appl. Microbiolol. 86:145-156.

Mahoney, R.R. 1998. Galactosyl-oligasaccharide formation during lactose hydolysis: a review. Food Chem.

63:147-154.

Ismail, S.A., Mabrouk, S.S. and Mahoney, R.R. 1997. Purification and characterization of b -galactosidase from

Mucor pusillus. J. Food Biochem. 21:145-162

Mahoney, R.R. 1997. Lactose: Enzymatic Modification, in Advanced Dairy Chemistry 3 (P.F.Fox ed) Chapman

and Hall, London, pp. 77-125.

Surve, S.S. and Mahoney, R.R. 1996. Thermostablilization of b -galactosidase (Kluyveromyces

marxianus) by histidine: physical studies. Biotechnol. Appl. Biochem. 23:155-162.

DAVID JULIAN MCCLEMENTS

Affiliations: Associate Professor Department of Food Science

Education: BS, University of Leeds (UK), 1985; PhD University of Leeds (UK), 1989

Positions: Postdoctoral Fellow University of Leeds (UK), 1989-1991; University of California/Davis, 1992-1994; University College Cork (Ireland), 1994; Assistant/Associate Professor, University of Massachusetts

Selected Honors and Awards

Young Scientist Award, American Chemical Society, Division of Agriculture and Food Chemistry;

Samual Prescott Award, Institute of Food Technologists

University and Professional Service and Outreach

Editorial boards: Food Hydrocolloids, Journal of Dairy Science

Member: American Chemical Society, Royal Society of Chemistry

Institute of Food Technologists

Grants (last 5 years)

USDA-IFAFS, (PI, E.A. Decker). $1,722,000.

USDA-NRI, 1996-2000, $235,000.

USDC-SK, 1995-1999, $121,000.

Dairy Management Inc., 1997-2000, $136,000

Procter & Gamble, Nestle, Pepsi, Wild Flavors, 1994-2001, $120,000

Research Interests

Development of novel ultrasonic techniques to characterize foods. Study of molecular/colloidal basis of the physiochemical properties of food biopolymers, colloids and emulsions. Utilization of edible biopolymers, colloids and emulsions to develop nutraceutical foods with health promoting properties.

Selected Publications (last 5 years, 143 total publications)

McClements, D.J. 1999. Food Emulsions: Principles, Practice and Techniques. CRC Press. Boca Raton, Florida.

D.J. McClements and E.A. Decker. 2000. Lipid oxidation in oil-in-water emulsions: Impact of molecular

environment on chemical reactions in heterogeneous food systems. J. Food Sci. 65, 1270-1282.

S. Baier and D.J. McClements. (2001). Impact of preferential interactions on thermal stability and gelation of bovine

serum albumin in aqueous sucrose solutions. J. Agric. Food Chem. 49, 2600-2608.

R. Chanamai and D.J. McClements. (2001). Prediction of emulsion color from droplet characteristics: Dilute

monodisperse oil-in-water emulsions. Food Hydrocolloids. 15, 83-92.

A. Kulmyrazaev, C. Cancalliare and D.J. McClements. (2000). Characterization of aerated foods using ultrasonic

reflectance spectroscopy. J. Food Eng., 46, 235-241.

R. Chanamai and D.J. McClements. (2000). Dependence of creaming and rheology of monodisperse oil-in-water emulsions on droplet size and concentration. Colloids Surf. A. 172, 79-86.

E. Dickinson and D.J. McClements (1995). Advances in Food Colloids, Blackie Academic and Professional, Glasgow.

 

LYNNE A. McLANDSBOROUGH

Affiliations: Associate Professor Department of Food Science, member of MCB Program

Education: BA, Miami University (Ohio); MS and PhD University of Minnesota, 1989, 1993.

Positions: Postdoctoral Fellowship at University of Minnesota, 1993-1995; Assistant/Associate Professor, University of Massachusetts 1995-Present

Selected Honors and Awards

College of Food and Natural Resources Outstanding Teaching Award 2001

University and Professional Service Outreach

Editorial Board: Journal of Food Protection, Food and Nutraceutical Biotechnology

Panel member: USDA National Research Initiative Grant Program;

USDA Small Business Innovation Research Grant Program; USDA National Research Initiative Grant Program

Member: American Society of Microbiology, The Institute of Food Technologists, International Association Food Protection, American Meat Science Association, and New England Society of Industrial Microbiology

Participant: FAO Expert Consultation; National Advisor Institute of Food Technologists Student Association and member Committee on Sections and Divisions (1998-2000); Chairman, Department of Food Science Undergraduate Recruiting Committee

Grants (last 5 years)

USDA, Seafood Safety, (with 5 others) 99-01, $495,023

USDA, 00-03, $84,199

University of Massachusetts Faculty Research Grant. 2000, PI, $10,000

USDA 9702070, 97-00, $92,000

NCBA, 1998, $22,000

USDA 9601533, 96-99, $53,000

Selected Publications (last 5 years, 35 total publications)

Djordjevic, D., Wiedmann M. and L. A. McLandsborough, L.A. Submitted. The use of a microtiter plate assay for

assessment of Listeria monocytogenes biofilm formation. Appl. Environ. Microbiol.

Li, J., McClements, D.J. and McLandsborough, L.A. 2001. Interaction between emulsion droplets and Escherichia

coli cells. J. Food Sci. 66:570-575.

Shaw, W.K., and McLandsborough, L.A. 2000. PCR reaction parameter titration as an approach to develop

shortened reaction times in a conventional thermal cycler. J. Rapid Meth. Automat. Microbiol. 8:53-64

Prachaiyo, P., and McLandsborough, L. 2000. A microscopic method to visualize Escherichia coli interaction with

beef muscle. J. Food Prot. 63:427-433

Fernec, J., Oliver, J., Witkowski, R., McLandsborough, L. and Levin, R. 2000. Studies in the growth of

Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains at 45.5°C. J. Food Prot. 63:1173-1178.

Li, J. and McLandsborough, L.A. 1999. The effects of the surface charge and hydrophobicity of Escherichia coli in

its adhesion to beef muscle. Int. J. Food Microbiology. 53:185-193

MICHA PELEG

Affiliation: Professor of Food Engineering, Department of Food Science

Education: BS, Technion Israel Institute of Technology, 1963; MS, Technion Israel Institute of Technology, 1967; (Food Engineering and Biotechnology) Technion Israel Institute of Technology, 1971

Positions: Assistant/Associate/Professor, University of Massachusetts 1975-present

Selected Honors and Awards

G. W. Scott Blair Award , AACC 1995

University and Professional Service and Outreach

Editorial Board Membership: Journal of Texture Studies, 1982-present, Journal of Food Science, 1985-1988 and 1999 present, Journal of Technology International. 1996-present, Journal of Food Properties, 1997-present, Aspen Food Engineering books Series, 1998-present, Journal of Food Protection, 2001-2003.

Invited speaker to Special Conferences, Short Courses and Seminars: U.S.A., France, Columbia, Mexico, Germany, Netherlands, Switzerland, England, Israel, Venezuela, New Zealand, Argentina, Costa Rica, Spain. Visiting Professor at the Technological University of Karsruhe (Germany), Spring semester: 1989 & 1996. Advisor to the University of Costa Rica on a Food Technology Program, Spring & Winter semester 1986 & 1989. Visiting Professor at the Technion, Israel Institute of Technology, Fall & Winter semester 1982 & 1996.

Grants (last 5 years)

USDA-NRICGP, 1997, $150.000; USDA-NRICGP, 2000, $145.000

USDA-NRICGP, 2001, $90.000

Research Interest

Mathematical and computer-aided modeling and analysis of rheological behavior of solid foods, Mechanical testing of food materials, Mechanical aspects of the tactile sensory system, Texture and texturization, Viscometry, Physical stability of powders, Microbial populations dynamics, Calculation of microbial inactivation.

Selected Publications (last 5 years, 250 total publications)

Campanella, O.H. and Peleg, M. 2001. Theoretical comparison of a new and the traditional method to calculate C.

botulinum survival during thermal inactivation. J. Sci. Food Agric. 81:1069-1076.

Corradini, M.G., Engel, R. and Peleg, M. 2001. Sensory thresholds of consistency of semi liquid foods: Evaluation

by squeezing flow viscometry. J. Texture Studies 32:143-154.

Mattick, K.L., Legan, J.D., Humphrey, T.J. and Peleg, M. 2001. Calculating Salmonella inactivation in non-

isothermal heat treatments from non-linear isothermal survival curves. J. Food Protec. 64:606-613.

Peleg, M., Penchina, C.M. and Cole, M.B. 2001. Estimation of the survival curve of Listeria monocytogenes during

non-isothermal heat treatments. Food Res. Intnl. 34:383-388.

Engel, R., Normand, M.D., Horowitz, J. and Peleg, M. 2001. A model of microbial contamination of a water

reservoir. Bull. Math. Biol. 63:1025-1040.

Engel, R., Normand, M.D., Horowitz, J. and Peleg, M. 2001. A qualitative probabilistic model of microbial

outbursts in foods. J. Sci. Food Agric. 81:1250-1262.

Peleg, M. and Penchina, C.M. 2000. Modeling microbial survival during exposure to a lethal agent with varying

intensity. Crit. Rev. Food Sci. 40:159-172.

Peleg, M. and Horowitz, J. 2000. On estimating the probability of aperiodic outbursts of microbial populations from

their fluctuating counts. Bull. Math. Biol. 62:17-35.

Corradini, M.G., Stern, V., Suowonsichon, T. and Peleg, M. 2000. Squeezing flow of semi liquid foods between

parallel Teflon coated plates. Rheologica Acta 39:452-460.

Shan, Y., Normand, M.D. and Peleg, M. 1997. Estimation of the surface concentraton of adhered particles by color

imaging. Powder Technol. 92:147-153.

Peleg, M. 1997. Line jaggedness measures and their applications in textural evaluation of foods. Crit. Rev. Food Sci.

Nut. 37: 491-518.

KALIDAS SHETTY

Affiliation: Associate Professor of Food Science, member MCB and Plant Biology Programs

Education: BS, Univ. of Agri. Science, 1983, Bangalore, India; MS and PhD University of Idaho, 1986, 1989

Positions: Postdoctoral Scientist, National Institute of Agrobiological Resources, Tsukuba Science City, Japan and University of Guelph, Canada 1990-1993. Assistant/Associate Professor, University of Massachusetts 1993-present

Selected Honors and Awards

Lilly Fellowship for Teaching, CFNR Outstanding Teaching Award, USDA panelist, Asia-Pacific Clinical Nutrition Society Award

University and Professional Service and Outreach

Editor, Food Biotechnology and Editorial Boards of J. Food Biochemistry, Process Biochemistry and Innovative Food and Emerging Technologies, Member of Lilly Selection Committee(1998-2002) , CFNR Personnel Committee (1996-1998) and Member of CFNR Faculty Development Committee (1998-2001).

Grants (last 5 Years)

NOAA-SK, 97-98, $ 62,215

Parsons Seeds, Ltd., 98-99, $100,000

USDA-NRI, 00-03,$193, 300

American Meat Institute Foundations,00-01, $54,500

USDA, Seafood Safety, (with 5 others) 99-01, $495,023

Research Interests

Food Biotechnology-genetic and physiological regulation of synthesis of antioxidants, antimicrobials, anti-inflammatory, cancer chemopreventive metabolites, phytoestrogens and flavors in plants and during solid state fermentation of legume foods with focus on phenolic metabolites. Molecular and Biochemical Bioassay models using bacterial, yeast and mammalian cell cultures to screen antioxidants, antimicrobials, anti-cancer and immune modulating phytochemicals. Molecular physiology of early stages of seed sprouting/germination, in vitro shoot organogenesis and somatic embryogenesis with focus on the role of proline-linked pentose phosphate pathway in regulating the phenylpropanoid pathway. Environmental Biotechnology-bioconversion strategies to develop value-added products from fishery and fruit (food) processing wastes using solid state fermentation. Product targets are phenolic metabolites, plant clonal propagation, mushroom production, and bio-inoculant technology for agriculture and environmental remediation.Development of all these products involve phenolic metabolism.

Selected Publications (last 5 years, 85 total publications):

Kaspera, R., McCue, P. and Shetty, K. 2001. Partial purification of a basic guaiaciol peroxidase from fava bean

(Vicia faba L. ): Chracterization of enzyme stability following elicitor treatment. Fd Biotech., 15: 99-111.

Shetty, P., Atallah, M.T. and Shetty, K. (2001) Enhancement of total phenolic, L-DOPA and proline contents in

germinating fava bean(Vicia faba) in response to bacterial elicitors. Fd Biotech., 15:47-67.

Duval, B. and Shetty K. 2001. The stimulation of phenolics and antioxidant activity in pea(Pisum sativum) elicited

by genetically transformed anise root extract. J.Food Biochemistry, 25:361-377

Andarwulan, N. and Shetty, K. 2000. Stimulation of novel phenolic metabolite, epoxy-Psuedoisoeugenol

(2-Methylbutyrate)[EPB], in transformed anise (Pimpinella anisum L.) root cultures by fish protein hydrolysates.

Fd Biotech., 14:1-20.

Zheng, Z. and Shetty, K. 2000. Solid-state production of polygalacturonase by Lentinus edodes using fruit

processing wastes. Process Biochemistry, 35:825-830.

Zheng, Z. and Shetty, K. 2000. Solid-state bioconversion of phenolics from cranberry pomace and role of Lentinus

edodes beta-glucosidase J. Agric.Food Chem., 48:895-900.

McCue,P., Zheng,Z., Pinkham.J.L. and Shetty,K. 2000. A model for enhanced pea seedling vigor following low pH

and salicylic acid treatments. Process Biochemistry, 35:603-613.

Programs Expectations for Faculty

We are proud that the Department of Food Science at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst has developed an internationally respected program in each of our areas of emphasis (Food Safety, Physical and Chemical Properties, Food Biotechnology and Health and Wellness) with a tightly knit minimum number of faculty who all contribute to our teaching, research and outreach efforts.

For those faculty who do not have administrative positions like Drs. Clydesdale and Hultin the average minimum expectation for teaching is 1 1/3 courses per semester or 7-9 credits per year. The expectations for teaching vary depending on the amount of advising, outreach, service and research with which the faculty member is involved. It is understood that faculty members are individuals with individual strengths and we attempt to maximize the strength of the individual in their assignments while insuring that all faculty interact with students at both the graduate and undergraduate level in courses and/or as major advisors of students in their laboratories. We believe that the one on one teaching that goes on in a research laboratory is equally important as course work for both graduate and undergraduate students and therefore must be considered as part of a faculty members teaching load and added to the 7-9 credits mentioned previously.

We are proud of the fact that all our courses, whether they be for majors or University service courses are taught by tenure track faculty. We believe that students deserve this level of teaching whenever possible.

Research activity is expected from every faculty member and is measured by the number of students, post doctoral fellows and visiting scientists in the laboratory; the number of peer reviewed publications; and the external funding generated by the faculty member. If an individual has a small research program as measured by these parameters then more time on teaching, outreach and service is expected.

Some of the service activities of our faculty are discussed in the sections covering "Department, College and University Committees", and "National and International Activities" which we feel are essential to both the smooth operation and the reputation of the Department.

As in the other areas we expect that all faculty will be involved in outreach to some extent depending upon their commitment in other areas. However, at a minimum we expect that our faculty will answer telephone questions from state Constituencies, be willing to meet with representatives from Companies from within the Commonwealth and to take part in our Strategic Research Alliance.

These expectations are consistent with program policies regarding teaching assignments, merit allocations and other aspects of faculty roles and rewards.

 

Professional Development and Growth of Faculty

The program in the Department of Food Science fosters professional development and growth of faculty in many ways. However, the most effective way may be in creating a departmental environment where scholarship, creative thinking and discourse are not only encouraged but celebrated. It would be hard to imagine anyone becoming a part of our department and its activities and not being stimulated professionally.

However, there are many more concrete ways in which the program fosters faculty growth. Sabbaticals are available for all faculty and the Department encourages faculty to avail themselves of the opportunities they present for professional growth. Encouragements is in the form of creating flexible times for courses to be taught and the willingness of other faculty to share the load of a colleague who is on sabbatical. Our faculty are to be congratulated for their wonderful cooperative and collegial spirit which allows our Department to flourish.

Every faculty member in our Department has a Hatch project and funds from this project might be used, in part, for travel to a professional meeting to present a research paper on the Project. Participation in professional meetings are an excellent way to foster development.

Several of our faculty hold senior positions or have long held relationships with organizations such as IFT, ACS, FDA, NAS and ILSI to name a few. Often, nominations of other faculty are made by these faculty for committee membership or service, of one kind or another, which allows excellent opportunities to foster growth.

Our Departmental Strategic Research Alliance (SRA) has some 26 member companies which provides interaction with industrial scientists whereby the most recent industrial research and scientific techniques can be discussed and debated. Further it provides an opportunity for faculty to submit grants to SRA members for funding and/or technical and other assistance.

The Department has held four Symposia in the past decade with both national and international speakers. These Symposia have attracted a wide International audience and faculty are encouraged to attend and participate with free registration being provided. Such participation not only allows faculty to hear the presentations but also to personally interact with both attendees and speakers.

Each year the Department sponsors the Endresen Lectureship, and faculty are invited to join the recipient for lunch and discussions as well as to attend the lecture. The Department also has a weekly series of graduate seminars and the University has a tremendous variety of seminars. Our faculty are encouraged to take part in these, whenever possible.

Membership and activities in professional societies and government committees are encouraged and noted in merit considerations as are organizing symposium and other activities which foster development.

Funds to assist in teaching and for class materials are available at the department level, the College level and the University level. In the latter case the Faculty Union Contract often has a clause for funds for Professional Development. The University through its Center for Teaching offers opportunities for growth as does the Office of Information Technology and Continuing Education for developing of electronic courses, web sites and general utilization of computers.

The Department is most fortunate to have some dozen Visiting Scholars and/or Adjunct Professors in the department at any given time. These scientists provide an extremely valuable resource to faculty in their professional development.

Finally, it is difficult in a scientific discipline to grow professionally if equipment is not available. The faculty, therefore, voted to use some of the funds generated by SRA membership and other sources to provide matching funds for equipment proposals brought forth by faculty. To date this has provided the Department and its faculty with state of the art equipment to conduct research, use for teaching and for the education of graduate students.

Outreach to Off Campus Constituencies

Our work with off campus constituencies is a key element of our outreach and service. We, as faculty, believe that outreach and service are simply an extension of our teaching and research and therefore a critical component of our academic obligations. We also believe that Outreach may be a valuable source of external funds.

National and International Activities

Our faculty is highly committed to involvement at both the National and International level. Some of these commitments are noted in the individual abbreviated C.V.’s but a summary of some of these activities is warranted because of their critical contributions to our off campus constituencies.

Faculty chair and serve on various committees of the National Academy of Sciences, IFT, American Dietetic Association, American Society of Nutrition Sciences, American Meat Science Association, FDA, USDA and ILSI. They also serve on the Pork Board and the Boards of ILSI, ILSI North America, and the American Meat Institute. Our Faculty serve as Editors or Co-Editors for 9 journals/books and 25 Editorial Boards. As well, they serve on the jury for USDA Competitive Grants Program in three categories, the jury for the Sea Grant Awards, NSERC, the Canadian NRC, and as External Advisors and Visiting Professors at several Universities.

This is in addition to the ten plenary and/or keynote papers, 36 invited papers and 54 papers presented this past year nationally and internationally.

The Department has international collaborations with various Universities aboard in various countries around the world such as Canada, Mexico, Japan, India, China, Thailand, Australia, South America, England, Germany, Italy, France, Demark, Portugal, and Ireland. Long-term research exchanges and collaborations have been established with the University of Fisheries (Tokyo, Japan), the University of Nuevo Sierra Leon (Mexico), Mahidol University in Life Sciences and a Ph.D. exchange program with a consortium of seven universities in Thailand. Additionally, faculty have served on various international committees, such as the Board of Trustees of ILSI (International Life Sciences Institute), Biotechnology Advisory Board to the state of Karnataka (India), and chaired an international committee to evaluate Public Danish Fisheries research. Other activities are, for example, Plenary Speakers and Chairs at international meetings, guest lecturers in seminars and workshops and advisors in food science and technology biotechnology and seafood science in numerous countries.

Our success internationally is evidenced by the fact that the Food science Department was recently named the first FAO Center of Excellence in Food Science and we hosted an FAO/UN Consultation on Listeria in Fish in the Spring of 1999.

In addition to these activities we reach out to many other constituencies because we define our external constituencies as any group outside of the University who has an interest in our activities or who might benefit from interactions with our Department. This is a narrower group than our total constituency which of course includes students, the University administration, the legislature and the citizens of the Commonwealth.

Thus we focus our Outreach efforts on:

Alumni

Local Industries

Statewide Industries

National Food Industries, Government and Universities

Industrial Alumni Advisory Board

It was decided that in order to reach alumni and industry as well as having external input and review of Department activities it was essential to establish an Industrial Alumni Advisory Board.

We had many faculty discussions on the advantages and disadvantages of limiting Advisory Board membership to Alumni. However, we decided that since many of our alumni held leadership positions in the Food Industry the disadvantages would be minimal while the advantages would be great.

Therefore, in 1990, with the most able participation of Mr. Charles Feldberg, Vice President, CPC International we developed a charter and established the first Food Science Industrial Alumni Advisory Board. Both the Charter and the current membership of the Board can be seen in the Appendices.

The Advisory Board has played a pivotal role in all our other efforts in outreach, economic development, endowment campaigns, alumni support and program development.

Alumni Outreach

Budgetary constraints accompanied by the added costs of maintaining a modern science facility for teaching and research mandated a focused program which included support from alumni as well as industry, government, foundations and associations.

With the assistance of the Advisory Board we developed a plan to increase interactions with the Alumni prior to seeking support which involved 3 major areas: (1) development of an Alumni Newsletter which would be published twice a year (2) establish an Alumni Breakfast at the Annual Meeting of the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) and (3) begin the tradition of bi-yearly Alumni Weekends on campus. These goals were accomplished and the resulting support we have received, described in a later section, lends credence to the success of this effort.

Off Campus Teaching

Through discussions with Dr. L. Kuzminski, Vice President, Ocean Spray we developed an off campus MS program to be taught at Ocean Spray. As a result we graduated 17 students with an MS degree. Both the students and the Company were pleased with the result as productivity and innovation markedly increased according to Dr. Kuzminski.

A similar program, but non-degree, was conducted at the Pfizer Food Science Division in Groton, CT. Again our faculty traveled to their site and presented courses in Food Chemistry and other areas. We provided a certificate of completion to the attendees.

An off campus M.S. program to be taught via expressed video, in real time, has recently been developed.

Symposia

Outreach interactions have also been most successful on campus in the form of Symposia. We have had 4 major Symposia in the past 9 years with speakers of outstanding stature from our Department as well as those invited from the U.S. and abroad.

The Symposia were:

  1. Breakthrough Technologies, over 100 attendees
  2. The First International Conference on Natural Colors, over 250 attendees from 25 countries
  3. Antioxidants and Oxidative Processes in Health and Foods, over 100 attendees
  4. Food Science and Health: Toward a National Rational Policy, over 100 attendees

Faculty are encouraged to develop Symposia and the Department will provide financial guarantees. Symposia provide tremendous learning resources for faculty and students, brings many scientists to campus which increases the potential for external cooperation and grants, and also provide a source of unrestricted funds for faculty.

Small and/or Start-up Companies

In order to insure that small and/or start-up companies in Massachusetts were not left out of our efforts we worked with the Western Mass Food Industry Association to develop opportunities for interactions. As a result our faculty not only continued to serve as a resource but their research and technical assistance has been responsible for some half dozen new companies and technological input for new product development in established companies. We opened our pilot plant for use on a scheduled basis with cost on a sliding scale. This has proven to be most helpful to the many companies who availed themselves of the service.

Seafood Industry

The University of Massachusetts Marine Station in Gloucester has been and continues to be an integral part of our Outreach program. Through the efforts of Dr. Hultin, its Director, over 100 technical contacts from industry are made annually. This is of course, in addition to the outstanding research at the Marine Station and here in Amherst. Three years ago in conjunction with Dr. Jim Leheny of the Chancellor’s office and our Food Safety Group we were able to achieve a line item in the Federal USDA budget for Seafood safety for $235,552. This year, we received our second year of funding for $259,471 under the leadership of our steering committee, chaired by Dr. Levin and having Drs. Shetty, Peleg, McLandsborough and Labbe as members. Dr. Levin, working with faculty in the physical-chemical area, Drs. Decker, Chinachoti, Hultin and McClements put together a proposal this year which included not only Seafood Safety but also Nutrition and Quality. We are most pleased that this proposal has been funded for $374,445.

Strategic Research Alliance

The formation of a Strategic Research Alliance with industry membership was a culmination of our efforts to transfer our research and technology to the community, both locally and globally. This Alliance has had remarkable success. It formed as result of our efforts to establish centers of excellence in basic research of value to industry and consumers.

The University is in a competitive marketplace with every other major research university in the U.S., and perhaps internationally. This fact must be recognized along with the reality that industry today will by and large support those universities that provide the greatest potential for increasing their bottom line. As a result, faculties with a reputation for outstanding scholarship through publications and involvement in scientific meetings, government committees, industry institutions and associations, the national academies and regulatory bodies attract funds, not a sales force.

In our Strategic Research Alliance (SRA) each industry member of the Alliance pays yearly membership dues.

Membership provides:

Through the alliance member companies become more familiar with research activities and fund individual projects and/or use faculty as consultants over and above their membership fees.

Thus the department receives unrestricted funds that are used to fund some of the operation of the department, support faculty development and provide internal RFP’s for equipment. Faculty have the opportunity to submit grant proposals to member companies where synergies exist. In all cases the research involved conforms with the strategic plan of the department.

A brochure describing the SRA along with its current membership may be found in the appendices and/or on our web site http://www.umass.edu/foodsci/.

TEACHING/LEARNING AND CURRICULUM

The Undergraduate Program

The overall goal of the undergraduate program is to:

Develop individuals with the knowledge and skills required to become successful scientists within the food profession.

In our four-year Food Science B.S. program our aim is for all graduates to acquire the following:

  1. A strong understanding of the basic sciences including math, chemistry, physics and biology.
  2. A thorough knowledge of food processing, microbiology and chemistry principles and techniques.
  3. An appreciation of the need for an integrated, multidisciplinary approach to Food Science.
  4. Critical thinking skills to solve complex problems in Food Science
    1. The ability to identify and characterize problems in Food Science.
    2. The ability to develop rational and systematic approaches to solve problems in Food Science
    3. The skills to identify, collect and analyze relevant data.
    4. The competence and confidence to generate conclusions, implement solutions and evaluate new outcomes.
    5. Strong verbal and written communication skills.
    6. The ability to work independently and in teams.

In order to accomplish this goal we integrate courses, curricula, learning experiences and advising along with a critical evaluation of outcomes.

The Food Science curriculum at the University of Massachusetts is based on the accredited curriculum established by the Institute of Food Technology, the professional society of Food Scientists. This curriculum is focused in 3 majors areas: Food Chemistry, Food Microbiology and Food Processing/Engineering. The content of the Food Chemistry courses focuses on food composition, the structure and function of food components (e.g. water, protein, lipids, carbohydrates and food additives), how the components of food are analyzed and how the physical and chemical properties of food components are influenced by processing, storage and, utilization. The Food Microbiology content focuses on pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms in foods, beneficial food microorganisms and the influence of food systems on the growth and survival of microorganisms. Food processing/engineering content includes food preservation, engineering principles (e.g. mass and energy balance, thermodynamics and flow behavior) and food processing techniques. In addition to the IFT accredited major, we offer curricula in Food Science and the Environment and Food Science and Human Health. These latter two curricula were developed with the advice of our Departmental Advisory Board, Alumni and Industrial Strategic Alliance members to prepare students for new challenges in the food industry. The Food Science and the Environment and Food Science and Human Health are curricula based on the IFT accredited curriculum but modified to include additional classes in Environmental Sciences and Health. To accommodate these additional classes, the curricula were changed to have one semester of organic chemistry and physics and no calculus. These changes allow the curriculum to include program electives. These program electives give the student versatility to supplement their Food Science education with courses in Nutrition, Public Health and Environmental Sciences. Our curricula are evaluated internally by our Undergraduate Program Committee and externally by the Institute of Food Technology as well as by feedback on alumni job performance from our Department’s Food Industry Strategic Alliance Partners and Advisory Board. Department undergraduate course offerings appear in the Appendices.

In addition to traditional teaching, the Department also encourages undergraduates to obtain Food Science experiences outside of the classroom. This is accomplished by facilitating the development of internship and cooperative programs with Food Industry partners. Recent Food Industry partners that have hired our students as interns include Kraft, Gorton’s, Taco Bell, Nestle, Campbell’s Soup and Ocean Spray Cranberry. Students are also encouraged to work on research projects with individual faculty. Approximately 20-30% of our juniors and seniors participate in laboratory research projects.

Outcomes are evaluated by a number of different methods. Student performance is measured by traditional examinations as well as numerous outcome measurements based on special projects. The expectations of the undergraduate program and subsequent job skills is communicated to the students through advising (all students are required to meet individually with their advisors every semester), classroom evaluations and through the introduction of real life job challenges communicated via lectures presented to the students by visiting members of the food industry and government. Evaluation of the success of the undergraduate program is accomplished by College and University surveys as well as through interactions with our Alumni at local and national meetings and during our biannual Alumni Weekend. Undergraduate student excellence has been recognized by numerous scholarships from the College, University and National Organizations.

The Graduate Program

The overall goal of the Graduate Program is to impart to graduate students the technical knowledge and skills necessary to function at an advanced level in the food profession whether involved with applied or basic research in industry, regulatory issues, technical marketing decisions or an academic career.

In addition to the fundamental preparation associated with a B.S. degree in Food Science the graduate student is expected to be able to:

  1. Characterize problems/objectives associated with the thesis or dissertation topic assigned.
  2. Develop the experimental designs necessary to approach the research topic in question using contemporary skills and techniques.
  3. Analyze experimental data obtained and identify further approaches for clarifying ambiguous results or for more detailed studies.
  4. Demonstrate verbal and written communication skills as exemplified by presentation of seminars, completion of oral examinations, clearly written thesis/dissertation proposals, and a comprehensive thesis or dissertation describing their research program.

Graduate students are expected to have the background substantially similar to a B.S. degree from an IFT-approved food science degree program. A large portion of entering graduate students have B.S. degrees in related science disciplines. Such students "make up" deficiencies in food science courses during their first year. On the other hand, such students have solid foundations in microbiology, chemistry, food engineering, etc.

In addition to the above, graduate students must present a minimum number of graduate credits specific to the degree program (M.S., Ph.D.) as well as thesis and dissertation credits. Graduate students may meet their University and Departmental course requirements from a wide selection of science and engineering courses consistent with their interests and professional goals. Graduate courses are taught by faculty with the related background/research interests. Thus, course content is regularly modified to reflect emerging issues/ topics in the field. Two of the highest level graduate courses (700 - level) are offered each semester. The result is that each such course is offered every fourth semester.

After a review of the graduate program, the needs of the students and the direction in which science and technology was leading, it was decided to increase the flexibility in meeting course requirements. Therefore, the following curricula offerings were added:

In addition all graduate course offerings are listed in the appendices.

Graduate students are expected to acquire the general background knowledge to their area (food chemistry, food microbiology, food processing). Development of critical thinking skills follows largely from design, execution and interpretation of experiments. This is facilitated by student/ advisor interaction on an ongoing basis.

At the doctoral level, essential cognitive skills are assessed by a written comprehensive examination in which students are expected to demonstrate ability to

synthesize basic concepts in a cohesive response to a somewhat open-ended line of inquiry. Successful completion of this examination is followed by an oral examination. For this, the student is assigned a research topic (separate from his/her dissertation research) and presents and defends a research proposal before a faculty committee.

Our graduate program historically has attracted applicants with strong science backgrounds. Such students have thrived in the more fundamental research aspects which characterize our faculty’s scholarly work.

In addition to courses and grades (2.8 minimum GPA) from a previous B.S. degree program, admission criteria include results of standardized tests (GRE, TOEFL) and letters of recommendation. Applicants are admitted to the doctoral program only after having completed the M.S. degree or if they demonstrate substantial previous laboratory experience.

The yearly pool consistently attracts well-qualified individuals. Typically only 20-30% of applicants are recommended for admission, among the lowest percentage in our College.

The success of the graduate experience is assessed in a number of ways. In addition to course grades, all graduate students must pass a final oral examination on their research. Typically, the student will have co-authored papers published in peer reviewed journals. This is regularly the case with doctoral candidates.

All graduate students are expected to present their work at national meetings of relevant professional societies. Our students regularly receive "best paper" awards at such meetings. The success of our graduate students in obtaining positions in industry, government and academia is an excellent measure of our Graduate Program’s effectiveness.

Placement and Recruiting

One hundred percent of our students, both undergraduate and graduate, who wish, are placed in industry, government or academia (faculty member or graduate student) upon graduation.

We have some five to ten companies visit our Department each year to recruit as well as dozens of others contacting us for potential employees.

Interestingly, Kraft just completed a review of Food Science Departments and Universities where it recruits. As a result five Departments and Universities were taken off their list. I am delighted to report the team who evaluated the sites all voted positively for UMass Food Science.

In addition the Department has a long history of filling academic positions with its graduates nationwide and our students are actively sought by Food Science Graduate Schools.

Faculty Involvement and Effectiveness in Teaching

All of the core Food Science courses are directly taught by our Faculty. In addition, teaching assistants participate in the teaching of laboratories in Food Chemistry, Analysis, Microbiology and Processing. While the Faculty are involved in all aspects of classroom and laboratory teaching, the teaching assistants also provide a valuable resource by helping students with laboratory exercises and preparation of laboratory reports.

Faculty effectiveness in the classroom is evaluated by students at the end of each semester. Evaluations are performed using a format designed by the University of Massachusetts Center for Teaching. These evaluations are required to be included in Faculty Annual Reports and results are used as part of the teaching merit evaluation process conducted annually by the Departmental Personnel Committee. Teaching excellence by the Faculty has been recognized by 2 faculty being named Lily Fellows by the University Teaching Center, 3 faculty being awarded College of Food and Natural Resources Outstanding Teaching Awards, 2 Faculty being awarded Eastern Food Science Association Outstanding Professor Awards, 1 Faculty being awarded the College of Food and Natural Resources Outstanding Advisor Award and 1 Faculty being awarded the University Distinguished Teacher of the Year Award.

Table 5 shows the results of a Food Science senior undergraduate questionnaire involving satisfaction with lectures, advising and faculty etc. The results are extremely gratifying with over 83% of all the students selecting the top two categories (very satisfied or somewhat satisfied) to describe their undergraduates experience.


Table 5. University of Massachusetts-Amherst
Graduating Senior Survey 1998-2000 Department Results
Food Science

3 Year Response Rate (Calendar Years 1998-2000)

 

Total Graduates

29

 

Survey Respondents

24

 

Response Rate

82.8%

 
 
 

I. Satisfaction with major:

 

_________

_Percent_

_________

_________

_________

 

Very

Somewhat

Somewhat

Very

 

How satisfied are you with:

Satisfied

Satisfied

Dissatisfied

Dissatisfied

Mean

 

(N)

(4)

(3)

(2)

(1)

 

The accessibility of faculty in your major.

23

69.6

17.4

8.7

4.4

3.5

The quality of teaching in your major.

24

58.3

33.3

4.2

4.2

3.5

Academic advising in your major.

24

50.0

33.3

12.5

4.2

3.3

Faculty concern for your academic progress.

24

45.8

50.0

0.0

4.2

3.4

The effort you put into your major.

24

66.7

25.0

4.2

4.2

3.5

Your overall experience in this major.

24

66.7

20.8

8.3

4.2

3.5

                 


Source: University Office of Academic Planning and Assessment - Office of Institutional Research


 

RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT, MAXIMIZATION AND USE

Strategies for Developing Revenue

In the early nineties as we were developing our 1993 five year Strategic Plan we realized that innovative ways had to be found to develop a stream of revenue for the future. In fact three of the nine objectives of the 1993 plan were aimed at this goal (see page 11) through increased:

Research grants

Endowments

Alumni gifts

Industry gifts

Industry interaction and research grants

The faculty believed that the pursuit of funds from these many diverse areas was necessary to secure sufficient external funding. The "non research" sources would begin to provide some funding for equipment, travel and faculty development which would lead to more success in external funding, which would, in turn, make it easier to solicit other funds. In hindsight this assumption proved correct.

Our first effort was for an endowment campaign which we realized would depend on our Food Science Advisory Board which had been formed in 1990. The Board was made up of Alumni with high level positions in industry and government. We therefore developed an Endowment Campaign Committee of the Board who worked with the Department and the Development Office to produce a Campaign brochure (Case Statement) and a plan for achieving our goal of 1 million dollars. Concurrent with formation of the Board we also began an Alumni Weekend to be held every other year and a twice-yearly Alumni Newsletter which is now in its thirteenth year. The alumni weekend and the Newsletter proved to be very successful (100-150 alumni at each weekend) as did a UMass breakfast which was held at the Annual meeting of the IFT.

These events allowed us to foster and regenerate a real sense of pride and family in our Alumni who became contributors and sources of contacts for the campaign. Through these efforts we exceeded our goal of 1 million dollars in cash and equipment with over $900,000 in the Foundation and approximately $100,000 in new equipment donations.

Concomitant with these efforts alumni contributions went up and we formed the Strategic Research Alliance (SRA) described in a previous section.

Dr. F. J. Francis, a retired faculty member and Department Chair endowed the F. J. Francis Endowed Chair and our Advisory Board concluded a campaign to endow a Professorship.

A summary of these efforts is shown in Table 6 where it can be seen that total gifts (excluding research grants) to the department increased 180 times from FY1990 to FY2001. Endowment giving increased from zero to almost $2.5 million and current gifts increased 80 times.

As noted our efforts in raising external funds (exclusive of Hatch and Multi-State funds) were coincidental with our other efforts and have been equally successful over this period as noted in Table 7. This Table shows two columns, one of which * was calculated by the Department and the other ** calculated by the University as dollars expended. In either case, the increases are extremely impressive.

In addition to these efforts we have developed some interesting programs with International Universities. We have a cost sharing agreement for students and laboratory supplies with Thai Universities, cooperative grants and programs with Mexican Universities, cost sharing relationships with FAO, student exchanges with the Tokyo University of Fisheries (Japanese students are supported by Japan) and various other exchanges with German, Danish, Swedish and Swiss Institutions.

It is worthwhile to comment on two grants which were received in FY 02 and are therefore not shown in Table 6. As well, these grants illustrate the innovative approaches which have been used and the cooperative efforts which have been made with other institutions to increase our ability to generate funds.

Dr. Clydesdale working with Dr. Jim Leheny of the Chancellor’s Office and a Steering Committee chaired by Dr. Levin and having Drs. Shetty, Peleg, McLandsborough and Labbe as members put forth a proposal to obtain a Federal line items for Seafood Safety. This endeavors was successful. In the first year we received $235,512 and this year $259,471. However, the always innovative faculty decided to broaden the approach and Dr. Levin working with faculty in the physical-chemical and health and wellness areas, Drs. Decker, Chinachoti, Hultin and McClements put together a proposal this year which included not only Seafood Safety but also Health and Quality. This proposal, we are delighted to report was funded for $374,145, an increase of 44%.

Under the leadership of Drs. Decker and McClements a grant proposal to the USDA under its Initiative for Future Agriculture and Food Systems was developed.

Dr. Chinachoti and Dr. Cohen from Nutrition were part of the team as were groups from Harvard, UCONN and Penn State. The proposal "Efficacy of Producing Stable h -3 Fatty Acids to Enhance Food To Improve Human Health" received top ranking and was awarded $1,722,000 for 4 years. The Department and its faculty received many other equally important grants and in fact have eight active USDA competitive grants in a faculty of eleven. However these two were mentioned as they are indicative of our recent initiative in Seafood Safety and our new initiative in Health and Wellness. These grants along with others will certainly allow us to continue the upward trend in external grants shown in Table 6 during FY 02.


Table 6. All Gifts and matching gifts to the Department of Food Science

Between FY 1990 and FY 2001 including the

Strategic Research Alliance

 Year

Non-endowment Gifts

Endowment gifts

Total gifts

1988

1989

1990

1991

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

Total

23,450.00

40,129.63

40,157.00

54,894

101,201.35.25

61,490.00

108,633.50

115,312.00

132,740.00

155,958.69

249,273.00

214,672.30

208,887.00

272,583.80

1,779,382.52

0.00

1,125.000

66,100.00

26,040.00

130,120.00

99,117.00

670,512.26

117,723.18

71,142.70

44,830.14

14,356.00

141,480.64

844,402.18

218,718.50

2,445,667.60

23,450.00

41,254.63

106,257.00

80,934.25

231,321.35

160,607.00

779,145.76

233,035.18

203,882.70

200,788.83

263,629.00

356,152.94

1,053,289.18

491,302.30

4,225,050.12

Source: University Development Office


 

Table 7. Grants and expenditures from 1991-92 through 2000-01

Year

Grants*

Expenditures**

1991-92

495,418

154,400

1992-93

714,155

231,200

1993-94

755,406

331,700

1994-95

707,954

321,300

1995-96

843,706

518,800

1996-97

875,475

607,000

1997-98

1,083,023

756,700

1998-99

964,083

736,700

1999-00

1,218,481

503,500

2000-01

1,271,365

Not available

* Funds received from a grant during a particular year (not the total grant award) exclusive of endowment campaigns, the Strategic Research Alliance, Alumni Contributions, Hatch and Multi-State funds.

** Expenditures during a particular year from sponsored activity (may not include some industry grants).


Although we have seen some successes we want to emphasize that we are not complacent. We have just signed off on a $50,000 endowment to establish the Charm Science Scholarship contributed by Stanley Charm. We are evaluating a Departmental emphasis in Science/Policy. To that end we held a Symposium on November 7-8, 2001 and have added several adjunct professors in this area, namely:

Dr. Christine Lewis Taylor, Director of the Office of Nutritional Products, Labeling and Dietary Supplements, USFDA.

Dr. John Lupien, Former Director of the Food and Nutrition Division, FAO/U.N.

Dr. Julie Caswell, Professor, Resource Economics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

In the near term we will be working with our Advisory Board and our Adjunct Professors to plan a strategy for the future.

To broaden our outreach in Health and Wellness we invited Dr. Joseph Vita a Cardiologist and Professor at Boston University to present a seminar on Dietary Antioxidants and Endothelial Dysfunciton in Coronary Artery Disease as well as to discuss possible areas of research and grant collaborations. In addition we named

Dr. John Milner, from the National Cancer Institute, our Endresen Lecturer for 2002

to speak on, and discuss, the role of food, nutrition and genetics in cancer.

We are working with Ocean Spray and keeping track of the new funding proposal by NIH for the role of cranberries in urinary tract infections. Dr. McLandsborough’s works with biofilms and bacterial adhesion should provide us with great potential for funding in this area.

Finally, we are constantly investigating new initiatives with our Advisory Board, Alumni and SRA members. Taken together we believe that these innovative approaches will provide us with a healthy resource base for the future.

Allocations of Resources

Like all decisions in the Department, policies and procedures for the allocation of resources are developed by the faculty and where appropriate, such as in the case of Hatch and Multi State Funds, with the Dean and Director of the Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station.

Hatch, Multi State Funds and other funds for research are allocated on the basis of a combination of factors which include productivity in: publications and external funding as well as consideration for the number of graduate students and type of research being conducted.

Funds for teaching are allocated according to need. We attempt to provide funds for classroom needs for all faculty when requested and of course within reason. Faculty are also encouraged to write proposals for teaching equipment to the College, and the Department will provide cost sharing.

As noted previously some of the funds generated from the SRA and other sources are used to provide matching funds to faculty for costly equipment purchases (such as an NMR, Image Analysis System, Isothermal Titration Calorimetry, Ultrasensitive Differential Scanning Calorimetry, Differential Scanning Ultrasonic Resonator and an HPLC, to name a few) and often to provide full funding for less expensive but critically required equipment such as pH meters, simple spectrophotometers, etc. when other sources are unavailable.

In the case of costly equipment the faculty are required to submit a proposal indicating need, contributions the equipment will make to the strategic plan, research, publications and external funding which will probably result, and matching funds available. Such proposals are often reviewed by the entire faculty or the faculty in a particular area of emphasis prior to funding.

The Department also provides $300, which is generally matched by the faculty, to students giving papers and the President of our Food science Club for travel to the Annual meeting of the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT). Travel expenses are also provided to students who wish to attend local IFT meetings and the biannual Eastern Food Science Meeting.

Telephones, postage, computer connections, copying, faxing, secretarial, bookkeeping and all other services are provided to the faculty by the Department.

Maximization of Human Resources

In our 1993 Strategic Plan one of our nine goals was to "integrate, whenever possible, the expertise of our faculty within and outside of the Department" (page 11). We are fortunate that we are blessed with a productive, outstanding collegial and flexible faculty. These traits make integration and maximization of human resources much simpler. First and most importantly our faculty work together and cooperative so that the business of the Department is accomplished (teaching, research, outreach and service) as well as insuring that the Department runs smoothly.

The outstanding background and scientific credentials of our faculty along with their flexibility allows us to innovate resourcefully by using a team approach to address problems with an expansive focus capable of moving rapidly from the molecular to the applied levels. By flexibly combining the talents and expertise of scientists in our department with those of University of Massachusetts colleagues in the complementary fields of Polymer Science, Biology, Nutrition, Chemistry, Microbiology, and Engineering, among others, we can optimize our research and teaching capabilities to meet the quickly changing demands of the food industry and the profession.

As was noted on page 9 faculty serve on more than one area of emphasis so that a team can solve research and teaching issues in each area. This innovative design along with a cooperative faculty allows us to maximize our human resources and allows us to achieve results which might be expected from a much larger Department. As well, it must be stressed that we would not be able to accomplish what we do without an outstanding staff. Evidence of their ability is reflected by the fact that in each of the last four years a staff member has been a recipient of the Chancellors Citation Award. Our staff reflects the talent, flexibility and collegiality of our faculty.

Finally, but not the least important are the efforts of our outstanding students, many of whom are intimately involved in our teaching, research and outreach programs. Indeed all of them are offered the opportunity and their response is always heart warming.

Maximization of Material Resources

The same set of circumstances discussed in the last section allow us to maximize material resources. Faculty routinely share equipment and laboratory space and the department keeps one large laboratory for equipment and overflow when a large new grant is obtained. This space is not assigned permanently to any one faculty member. Discussions on space and equipment are open and to my knowledge have not created any real controversy in the last 12 years. Operating funds are maximized in the same way and by the procedures described under Allocation of Resources.

 

 

FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT BY AREAS OF EMPHASIS

Department facilities are located in Chenoweth Laboratory on the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Campus and at the Marine Station in Gloucester, Massachusetts.

As is the case with most Food Science Departments, we have a pilot plant that is used for teaching and research and is available to the Food Industry.

The Department is discipline based and not commodity based and therefore our major equipment and facilities are science based consistent with our goal of evolving from the molecular to the applied. Rather then simply list the equipment we use to achieve that goal we believe it would be more meaningful to discuss it within the framework of our Areas of Emphasis.

Food Safety

Food safety, spoilage and fermentation are critical components of Food Microbiology. The Food Microbiology group has a variety of equipment and techniques that are being used in teaching to investigate applied and fundamental queries in these areas. General areas of current research efforts include: a) identification of genetic determinants and strain variability in biofilm development b) studies on signaling of bacterial sporulation c) survey and ecological studies on presence of pathogens and spoilage organisms found on seafoods and seafood processing environments d) the influence of natural food extracts upon bacterial growth, adhesion and biofilm formation.

The microbiology group has 11 research laboratories in addition to five walk-in incubators. Additional facilities include a sterilization room with hot air sterilizers, autoclaves and several hot air incubators. The section has one ultracentrifuge as well as three high-speed refrigerated centrifuges; six UV-visible spectrophotometers, one certified biological laminar flow hood and two chemical safety fume hoods.

Specialized research equipment supports studies in the following areas:

Molecular Biology. The Food Microbiology section has all the essential equipment to perform molecular biology research. This equipment includes: five operational thermal cyclers, a microtiter plate reader, vertical and horizontal electrophoresis systems and power sources, fluorescent DNA analyzers, an electroporation apparatus and a digital gel documentation system. In addition, the microbiology group uses remote access to the University of Massachusetts Molecular Biology Computer System.

Molecular Differentiation of Bacteria. The Food Microbiology section has purchased two pieces of equipment dedicated to this area of research in the past three years: pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and a mutation detection system. The PFGE system (CHEF, Bio-Rad Laboratories) is being used to detect genomic differences in bacterial isolates based upon differences in restriction fragment polymorphisms. The mutation detection system (Dcode, Bio-Rad Laboratories) can be used to detect DNA polymorphisms based upon differential electrophoretic motility after denaturation within either chemical (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, DGGE) or temperature (temporal temperature gradient electrophoresis, TGGE) gradients. Currently this system is being used to detect differences in bacterial populations present in food processing plant ecosystems.

Bacterial Physiology. The Food Microbiology section is well equipped to perform research in the area of bacterial physiology. Current equipment includes: an inventory of low-pressure column chromatography systems with fraction collectors, two intermediate pressure column chromatography systems (FPLC), one isocratic HPLC system. In addition, there are sonicators and a French press for bacterial fractionation, one bench scale (0.5 L) and two pilot scale (7 and 14 L) fermentors, and a speed-vac system for concentrating and drying samples.

Food Biotechnology

Biotechnology encompasses biological systems for modification and/or separation of whole organisms, tissues, cells, proteins, nucleic acids and other biological molecules of plants, animals and microorganisms to: a) improve food processing by cell/tissue and cell bioconversions and genetic engineering at the DNA level b) develop food ingredients with nutritional, pharmacological and improved functional properties and enhanced economic value c) improve food safety through the enhancement of natural ingredients or components having antimicrobial and mutagen-inhibiting properties d) reduce problems of food waste and environmental pollution.

Current research efforts include a) development of novel plant tissue culture, whole plant and plant-based fungal fermented systems(solid state fermentation) to study the biosynthesis of functional phenolic metabolites for improving health and disease prevention b) development of yeast and mammalian cell culture- based bioassay systems to characterize plant-based phenolic metabolites that have anti-cancer and immune modulating properties at the molecular level c) studies on antimicrobial properties of phenolic phytochemicals against food-borne bacterial pathogens and bacteria associated with peptic ulcer, urinary tract infections and dental caries d) antioxidant properties of phenolic phytochemicals in the context of anti-cancer, immune modulating and antimicrobial properties e) solid state bioconversion based value-added product development for enhancing food and agricultural production using fruit and fishery processing wastes.

The facilities and equipment to support research and teaching in the area of Food Biotechnology are excellent.

Laminar flow hoods: Dedicated laminar flow hoods are available for plant tissue culture, animal cell culture and microbiology research. In addition there are 2 safety hoods dedicated for chemical studies.

Incubators: A dedicated plant tissue culture with several light and temperature control incubators are more than adequate and this includes a walk-in facility. In addition there are several non-light temperature incubators for solid-state fermentation and seed phytochemical studies.

Enzyme and nucleic acid studies: We have a unique BioRad Rotofer system for Iso-electric focus-based rapid purification of enzymes coupled to standard purification columns. These are particularly useful for characterization of enzymes in plant and microbial systems associated with phytochemical synthesis and release. In addition the routine gel analysis equipment for enzyme and nucleic acid studies are available.

Chemical Characterization: The program has a dedicated Agilent HPLC system for phytochemical characterization in plant and plant-fungal based solid state system.

Animal Cell Culture: Currently a CO2 based incubator is being established for animal cell culture growth with separate micro plate readers for assays for characterization of phytochemical functionality. Additional incubators have been established for yeast based assays.

Spectronic Spectrophotometers: Two dedicated Spectronic Genesys spectrophotometers are specially available for chemical analysis, antioxidant assays and enzyme assays. A dedicated system has also been established for antimicrobial assays.

Physico-Chemical Properties Analytical Equipment

A rational understanding of the factors that determine the quality of structurally complex multi-component materials, such as most foods, depends on the application of a broad range of analytical methods that provide information about their molecular, structural and bulk physiochemical properties. The Physicochemical Properties group has built up an impressive array of analytical techniques for probing the properties of complex foods. These techniques are being used in both teaching and research to characterize the thermodynamic, chemical and molecular properties of proteins, polysaccharides, lipids and water. This information is being used to obtain a more fundamental understanding of the factors that determine the bulk physicochemical properties, the chemistry, and the mechanisms which account for bioactivity, storage stabilities and physiological effects of foods, which should lead to a more rational and systematic approach to the development of high quality, healthful and inexpensive foods. A brief outline of the specialized techniques available in our department is given below. In addition, the Physicochemical Properties group also has a wide variety of traditional laboratory equipment, such as spectrophotometers, HPLC, GC, electrophoresis, and ultracentrifuge.

Calorimetry - Conventional DSC instruments (DSC 100, Seiko Instruments, Torrance, CA; DSC-4, Perkin Elmer) with controlled cooling and heating capabilities are available for routine calorimetry. An ultrasensitive differential scanning calorimeter (VP-DSC, MicroCal, Northampton, MA) is available for characterizing weak phase transitions involving proteins, lipids or polysaccharides. An isothermal titration calorimeter is available for quantifying interactions between molecules in aqueous or organic solutions (VP-ITC, MicroCal, Northampton, MA).

Rheology - A differential mechanical analysis instrument (DMA110, Seiko Instruments, Torrance, CA) with bending and shear mode capabilities is available for monitoring temperature-dependent rheological changes of solid foods. A dynamic shear rheometer (Bohlin CS-10, Cranbury, NJ) is available for characterizing the rheological properties of liquids and gels. An Instron Universal Testing Machine (Instron) is available for measuring the rheological properties of solids in compression.

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance - An NMR spectrometer (23 MHz, Maran Ultra) with pulsed-field gradient and variable temperature probe head (-50 to 150 oC) is available. The 2D imaging system has solids NMR capability to measure T1, T2, diffusion, and solid state properties. It is also equipped with software for determining T1 and T2 distributions and for calculating emulsion droplet particle sizes based on the principles of restricted diffusion.

Image Analysis - An optical image analysis system with video capture camera attached to a microscope is available for observing dynamic structural changes. A heating/cooling stage (Thermascope,TM Interface Techniques Company, Cambridge, MA) is attached to the microscope for observing structural change upon heating, cooling or isothermal experiments. A data acquisition computer board reads temperature and time which are added digitally to the video image. The video recorder is equipped with time lapse capability allowing running samples over an extended period. Heating/cooling rates can be mimicked exactly to those used in thermal analysis. Polarized light attachment is available. An ultrasonic imaging system is also available for characterizing the internal structure of optically opaque materials (UltraPac, Physical Acoustics, Princeton, NJ).

Emulsion Preparation. High-speed blenders, sonicators and high-pressure valve homogenizers (APV-Gaulin, Willmington, MA) are available for preparing oil-in-water and water-in-oil emulsions.

Particle Sizing. Laser diffraction instruments are available for measuring particle size distributions of dilute colloidal dispersions (Horiba LA900, Horiba Instruments, Irvine, CA; Mastersizer-X, Malvern, Worcs, UK; LS230, Beckman-Coulter, FL). Ultrasonic velocity and attenuation spectroscopy is available for measuring particle size distributions and concentrations of concentrated colloidal dispersions (Ultrasizer 95, Malvern Instruments, Malvern, Worcs, UK; UltraPac, Physical Acoustics, Princeton, NJ).

Particle Electrophoresis - A fully automated particle electrophoresis technique is available for measuring the zeta potential of colloidal particles (Zeta Sizer, Malvern Instruments, Malvern, Worcs, UK).

Solution Properties. Wilhelmy Plate and Du Nouy ring methods are available for making interfacial and surface tension measurements (Kruss K10, Charlotte, NC). The ultrasonic velocity of solutions can be accurately measured using a fixed path length resonator (UHP Instruments, Germany). The density of solutions can be accurately measured using a digital oscillating U-tube densitometer (DMA4000, Mettler- Toledo, Germany).

Chromatography. HPLC equipment including pumps, manual and auto injectors, computer integrators and fluorescence, UV/Vis, refractometry and electrochemical detectors are available for analysis of antioxidants, lipid oxidation products, proteins and other biomarkers. This HPLC equipment can be configured to run up to 4 separate HPLC systems. Gas Chromatography systems are also available including 3 Hewlett Packard and 2, Shimadzu systems. Hewlett Packard and Tekmar Headspace analysis systems are utilized in conjunction with these gas chromatography systems.

Spectroscopy. Spectroscopy equipment includes a Shimadzu UV-Vis spectrophotometer equipped with an integrating sphere detector, a Pharmicia UV/Vis spectrometer equiped with a pelitier heating cell and a Hitachi Fluorometer equipped with a flow through cell that can double as an HPLC detector.

Health and Wellness

As noted in the 2001 Strategic Plan, page 12, we are adding another area of emphasis, Health and Wellness, into which the expertise of the other areas can flow. Teams from the other areas will utilize the facilities, equipment and expertise, described in the last 3 sections, to address issues involved with Health and Wellness.

Concluding Observations

Faculty and staff are the foundation of a successful academic Department. We are proud that the Department of Food Science has developed internationally respected teaching and research programs in our areas of emphasis (Food Safety, Physical and Chemical Properties, Food Biotechnology and Health and Wellness) with a tightly knit minimum number of faculty and staff who work cooperatively together with maximum flexibility in order to achieve our goals. We are, therefore, extremely concerned about the replacement of faculty and staff upon their retirement or resignation in light of the current budgetary environment. The loss of even one person would seriously affect our areas of emphasis in research, our ability to generate funds, our teaching programs and our outreach efforts, including our Strategic Research Alliance. In addition, we are concerned about the potential loss of Teaching Assistantships (TA’s) and how they would effect our current and future plans for teaching. The building and facilities are also a concern. We can live with what we have, and indeed prosper, but it is essential that fume hoods work, refrigeration is adequate and the building not leak.

Having said that, however, our Faculty, Staff, Students and Alumni are extremely optimistic about the future. We believe we have the planning, the organization, the material resources and most importantly the human resources in place to provide a solid foundation from which to build even higher standards of excellence and productivity for the future.

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Content last updated: May 24, 2002

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