UMASS AMHERST  Film & Video Course Guide 

SPRING 2011

  (updated 1/16/11)

Note:  This guide is a work-in-progress.  Course info may be subject to change.  We will update the website as we get more information.

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ANTHRO  106 - CULTURE THROUGH FILM                          cap 230
A-LEC(11318) Tu 6:00PM - 9:00PM             Bartlett Hall  room 65           Joannah Whitney AD01-DIS(11319) We 10:10AM - 11:00AM             TBA             Staff   
AD02-DIS(11320) We 11:15AM - 12:05PM             TBA             Staff   
AD03-DIS(11321) We 9:05AM - 9:55AM                      TBA             Staff   
AD04-DIS(11323) Th 9:30AM - 10:20AM                    TBA             Staff   
AD05-DIS(11324) Th 2:30AM - 3:20AM                      TBA             Staff   
AD06-DIS(11325) Th 4:00PM - 4:50PM                       TBA             Staff   
AD07-DIS(11326) Th 7:00PM - 7:50PM                       TBA             Staff
AD08-DIS(11327) Th 11:15AM - 12:05PM                     TBA             Staff   
AD09-DIS(18055)  Fr 10:10AM - 11:00PM                     TBA             Staff
Exploration of different societies and cultures, and of the field of cultural anthropology through the medium of film. Ethnographic and documentary films; focus on gender roles, ethnicity, race, class, religion, politics, and social change.  (Gen.Ed. SB, G)
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  6

ART  230 - PHOTOGRAPHY I
01-STS(14064) Staff                            Cap: 14
MoWe 9:05AM - 11:50AM   Studio Arts Building Room 240
Introduction to photographic tools and methods. The balance between self-inquiry and the importance of process and materials as vehicles of meaning. Theory explored through class critiques and slide presentations. Photography examined and discussed both from a personal point of view and in its wider cultural context.          
Open to undergraduate students with majors in Art, BFA-Art, BFA-Art Ed, BFA-Design or Art History.
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category: V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  none

ART  231 - PHOTOGRAPHY II
01-STS(14065)    Staff                            Cap:14
MoWe 4:40PM - 7:25PM       Studio Arts Building Room 240
In-depth exploration of techniques and materials including zone system, large format, and non-silver processes. Slide lectures, discussions, and readings. Prerequisite: ART 230 or consent of instructor.
Open to undergraduate students with majors in Art, BFA-Art, BFA-Art Ed, BFA-Design or Art History.
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category: V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  none

ART  297CC - ST-DIGITAL MEDIA: TIME BASED
01-STS(14174)       Rosanne Retz                                        Cap: 16
MoWe 1:25PM - 4:10PM      Studio Arts Building Room 16
Course Description: TBA
Open to Undergraduate ART, BFA-ART, BFA-ART ED, and BFA-DESIGN majors only.
Prerequsites: ART 110, 120, 131, 142 & 397N
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category: V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  8

ART  384 - COMPUTER ANIMATION II
01-STS(14180)    Staff                            Cap: 16
MoWe 10:10AM - 12:05PM,   Lab L01-LAB(17915): TBA    Fine Arts Center Rm 447
The second of a two semester sequence.  Animation techniques using digital tools as applied to film, video, music and technology.  Animation software (Maya) and professional compositing programs are used.  Development and design of personal work is stressed.  Emphasis is on creativity and professionalism.  Studio course.
Open to Undergraduate ART, BFA-ART, BFA-ART ED, and BFA-DESIGN majors only.
Prerequisite: ART 374
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category: V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  8

COMM 296F:  IndStu-FILMFESTIVAL
01-IND(16699)             Anne Ciecko              School of Management rm 137 Cap 200        
Wed 7:00-10:00pm 
**This is a 1-credit Mandatory Pass/Fail course
Film screening.  This semester's festival colloquium will be held in conjunction with the Massachusetts Multicultural Film Festival (MMFF). To earn 1 credit (pass/fail), students are required to attend a colloquium orientation during the first week of classes and at least 7 MMFF events throughout the semester, and to complete a survey at the end of each of the screenings attended.  (Course capacity is 50)
Course Eligibility*:   All majors; no prerequisites       
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  none (1-credit, pass/fail only)
Five College Film Studies Major category:  none (1-credit, pass/fail only)

COMM 331:  PROGRAM PROCESS IN TELEVISION  
David Maxcy,            Cap 36            
01-LEC(11361)We 10:10AM - 11:00AM             Machmer Hall W-25
L01-LAB(11417)Mo 1:25PM - 4:25PM             Herter TV Studio
L02-LAB(11418)We 1:25PM - 4:25PM             Herter TV Studio
L03-LAB(11419)) Fr 9:05AM - 12:05PM             Herter TV Studio
Lecture, studio. Introduction to concepts and techniques of television production, through lectures, lab exercises, and guided production projects. All 3 sections will meet together once a week for a 50-minute lecture with the course director. Each section (@12 students) will then meet once a week for a 3-hour lab session. (Course capacity is 36)
Course Eligibility*:  Open to Senior, Junior and Sophomore Communication majors only.
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  8

COMM 342:  HISTORY OF FILM II
Martin Norden  Office: 409 Machmer               Cap 150      
01-LEC(11362)TuTh 2:30PM - 3:45PM             Herter Hall room 231            
L01-LAB(11363)Tu 4:00PM - 6:00PM             Herter Hall room 231
Lecture, lab (screening), discussions.  A survey of key events and representative films that mark the history of worldwide cinema since 1950.  In addition to identifying and providing access to major works, the course is designed to facilitate the study of the various influences -- industrial, technological, aesthetic, social, cultural, and political -- that have shaped the evolution of the medium.  (Course capacity is 125)
Course Eligibility*:  Open to Seniors, Juniors and Sophomore Communication majors and others by permission of instructor.
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIA, V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  2

COMM 397CC FIRST PERSON DOCUMENTARY: BEGINNING VIDEO PRODUCTION
Bernadine Mellis
Mon 2-5pm, 127A Lederle and Mon 7-9pm, 108 South College
This introductory video production course will emphasize documentary filmmaking from the first-person point of view.  We will use our own stories as material, but we will look beyond self-expression, using video to explore places where our lives intersect with larger historical, economic, environmental, or social forces. We will develop our own voices while learning the vocabulary of moving images and gaining production and post-production technical training.  Through in-class critiques, screenings, readings and discussion, students will explore the aesthetics and practice of the moving image while developing their own original projects.
Prerequisite: Introduction to Film Studies.
Application and permission of instructor required.
Enrollment limited to 12.
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  8

COMM 397T:  Special Topic-CONTEMPORARY WORLD CINEMA
Anne Ciecko   Office: 306 Machmer                     Cap 43
01-LEC(11369) MoWe 3:35PM - 5:30PM            Machmer Hall E-87
Lecture.  This course offers an overview of recent narrative feature filmmaking from Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Latin America, and global diasporas.  Students will develop critical tools for watching, reading, and writing about international and intercultural cinema. The following types of questions will be addressed: What are the ways in which contemporary films construct images of nations and cultures?  What kinds of audio-visual representational strategies are used, and what kinds of negotiations occur? How do social, political, and economic circumstances impact the production, exhibition, and marketing/distribution of films?   How do films connect with different audiences (local and international markets for popular films, the arthouse and film festival circuit, video stores, the internet, pirates, etc.)?  What are the functions of international film stars, auteurs, and genres? 
Course Eligibility*:  all majors; no prerequisites
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  5, 6
           
COMM  433 - ADVANCED TELEVISION PRODUCTION AND DIRECTION
David Maxcy                          Cap:10
01-LEC(11370)            Tu 11:15AM - 3:15PM  Herter TV Studio
Lecture, Studio. Intensive workshop course in advanced concepts and techniques of studio-based television production, with a focus on the direction of live programs. Under the supervision of the instructor, students will produce individual projects in a variety of genres which will be aired on local cable television outlets. Prerequisite: COMM 331 or consent of the instructor.
Prerequisites: COMM 331 or COMM 397B
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IV, V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  8

COMM 441:  PRINCIPLES AND TECHNIQUES OF FILM STYLE PRODUCTION
Geisler   Office:411 Machmer                                             Cap 12
01-LEC(11416) We 1:25PM - 5:25PM             South College room 120
Lecture, studio.  A hands-on introduction to single-camera filmmaking using digital video camcorders (electronic field production) or 16mm cameras and non-linear (computer-based) editing. Students will learn concepts of pre-production, shot composition, lighting, visual storytelling, continuity editing, and production & post production audio as they plan, shoot and edit exercises and complete projects.  A "real world" editing project (scenes from an episode of "Highlander”) will also be included. 
Course Eligibility*:  Open to Senior & Junior Communication majors only.
Course Prerequisites:  COMM 231 or COMM 331 or permission of instructor.
Course Notes:  Junior and Senior Communication majors who have completed either COMM 231 or COMM 331 may add this course through Spire.   Others may add only by permission of the instructor. 
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IV, V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  8

COMM 493E SEMINAR-SCREENWRITING  
TuTh 9:30AM - 10:45AM, South College room 108
Instructor: Martin Norden            Cap20
Lecture, discussion.  An examination of the art, craft, and business of screenwriting from theoretical and practical perspectives.  Topics include screenplay format and structure, story, plot and character development, dialog and scene description, visual storytelling, pace and rhythm, analysis of professional and student scripts and films, and more.  Written work includes three screenwriting projects.  The focus is on writing for narrative films and, to a limited extent, TV programs. 
Prerequisite: COMM film course
Course Eligibility*:  Open to Senior & Junior Communication majors only.
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IV, V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  8

COMM 493F SEMINAR-FILM DOCUMENTARY
Bruce Geisler              Office: 411 Machmer
01-SEM(17280)            TuTh 1:00AM - 3:00PM             South College room 108      Cap 20
Lecture, discussion.  This course combines critical analysis with a hands-on introduction to producing a documentary.  Students will view, analyze, and critique all or part of fifteen works by filmmakers from Robert Flaherty ("Nanook of the North") to Morgan Spurlock ("Supersize Me"), to further their understanding of the documentarian's craft and art.  Students will also do pre-production (research and scripting) on their own short documentary, along with shorter hands-on exercises in writing narration, interview techniques, use of archival sources, etc.  (Course capacity is 20)
Course Prerequisites:  COMM 240 or 231 (Formally COMM 297D) or COMM 340 or COMM 342 or COMM 493E or consent of instructor.
Course Eligibility*:  Open to Senior & Junior Communication majors or by consent of instructor
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, IV, V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  4

COMM 593D S: Seminar-ADVANCED SCREENWRITING
Bruce Geisler              Office: 411 Machmer                                      Cap 20    
01-LEC(11457) TuTh 11:15AM - 12:30PM             South College room 120
Seminar.  Building upon the concepts learned in the introductory course (COMM 493E - Screenwriting Seminar), this class will involve an intensive workshop environment where students receive continuing, in-depth feedback on their work in progress, as they strive for professional competence in feature-length theatrical screenwriting or writing for episodic television.  Two professional screenplays and the films or TV shows produced from them will also be analyzed as students delve deeper into the writer's art and craft.  Students will complete either 60 pages of a feature length motion picture screenplay or a complete episode for an existing dramatic TV show, or two episodes for a current sitcom.  (Course capacity is 20)
Course Eligibility*:  Senior & Junior Communication majors or permission of the instructor
Course prerequisite:  COMM 493E or another college-level screenwriting course or permission of the instructor.
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IV, V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  8

COMP-LIT 382 – CINEMA AND PSYCHE
Catherine Portuges              Office: 320 Herter Hall                 Cap 120      GenEd: AT
01-LEC(14336) Mo 4:40PM - 7:05PM             Herter Hall rm 231
D01-DIS(14337) Tu 2:30PM - 3:45PM             TBA             Staff   
D02-DIS(14338) Tu 2:30PM - 3:45PM             TBA             Staff   
D03-DIS(14339) Tu 1:00PM - 2:15PM             TBA             Staff   
D04-DIS(14340) Tu 1:00PM - 2:15PM             TBA            Staff
Lecture,  Discussion.  An exploration of the intersections between cinema and psychological interpretation, the course concerns the psychodynamics of reading visual texts produced in different cultures, languages, and national traditions.  This semester's focus is on comparative representations of childhood, family, gender, and war in Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe, and the West.  Among our considerations are the following: how do individual directors represent history and national identity?  In what ways do spectators from different cultural milieux and historical moments understand those representations?  what are the psychological consequences of encountering powerful images from cultures other than one's own?  How do psychoanalytic perspectives enable us to 'read' the cinematic constructions of childhood experience, especially when portrayed in situations of trauma and wartime upheaval?  Based on close reading of films, theoretical and critical essays, and interviews, our work aims to examine the often-unconscious resistances and 'mis-readings' that accompany the increasingly international world of cinema.  Requirements: Attendance; a brief oral exercise; mid-term paper, final paper.
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIA, V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  6

COMP-LIT  383 - NARRATIVE AVANT-GARDE FILM
Staff
A-LEC(19122)  Mo 3:35PM - 7:00PM                       TBA
AD01-DIS(19123)  Fr 1:25PM - 2:15PM                       TBA
B-LEC(19124)   We 3:35PM - 7:00PM                       TBA
BD01-DIS(19125)  Fr 1:25PM - 2:15PM                       TBA
Lecture, discussion.  Explores modern origin of experimentation in film in avant-garde modes such as Expressionism, Surrealism and contemporary results of this heritage.  Trying to determine if film is the most resolutely modern of the media.  Emphasis on the ways in which Avant-garde films can problematize themselves through the ploys of telling a story.  By means of a self-consciousness of story-telling which undermines viewer identification, the drive for closure, the demand for origins and order, and even cause and effect, these avant-garde films restore to playfulness its strength and ambiguity.  Requirements: one 5 page paper for midterm; final paper or project; attendance.
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIA, V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  6

COMP-LIT 391A- S-INT. HISTORY OF ANIMATION
N. Couch                                                                                             Cap: 30
01-LEC(17970)                WED 6:00PM-9:00PM                       Room: Herter 209
This course traces the history of animation from the late 19th century to today, including short and feature-length films from the United States, Europe and Japan. Topics will include the Fleischer, Disney and UPA studios, directors from Emil Cole to Hayao Miyazaki, and experimental animators including Oskar Fischinger and John Canemaker. Animation for television, including Jay Ward's Rocky and Bullwinkle and Matt Groening's The Simpsons will also be considered.
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIA, V

COMP-LIT 391B - DYSTOPIAN FUTURES IN FILM & FICTION
Daphne Patai                                                                                             Cap: 50
01-LEC(19073)                TU 4:00PM-7:00PM                 Room: Herter 217
D01-DIS(19074)              TH 4:00-5:15PM                       Room: Herter 217
SEE COURSE POSTER.
Literature and film provide us with entertainment, pleasure, and stimulation. But dystopias -- in addition to working at that level -- express and address some of our most urgent fears and worries about our future. What does it mean to be human in an ever more technological society? How does society organize itself in a post-industrial age? What happens to individuals in a world whose culture is ever more homogeneous and driven by consumerism? What is the future of the human body? Are humans still linked to the natural world? What is the likely fate of our planet? What are the dangers of science and technology to a species whose emotions and wisdom may not keep up with its knowledge? What methods of social, economic, and political control will postmodern societies depend on? What space will exist for non-conformists? What is the role of religion in maintaining social order? These are only a few of the crucial issues to be explored in this course.
Readings in English; foreign films have subtitles.
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, V

COMPLIT 393F S: POLISH FILM
Barbara Bolibok,                     Office:741 Herter Hall                 Cap 30   
01-LEC(14335)    TU 4:00PM - 7:00PM                     Room: TBA
This course is an introduction to classics of Polish cinema. We will watch films by Poland’s best-known film directors to explore their key aesthetic, historical and philosophical concerns. Among directors whose works we will view are Roman Polan«ski, Andrzej Wajda, Wojciech Has, Jerzy Stuhr, Barbara Saas, Kazimierz Kutz, Andrzej Kondriatuk, Jerzy Skolimowski, Agnieszka Holland and Krzysztof Kies«lowski. Using the analytic language of literature, such as plot, character, setting, point of view, we will consider each film’s narrative content (story) as well as its formal features (its visual poetics). In our discussions of the films we will try to identify those qualities that give Polish cinematography its distinctiveness. We will also pay particular attention to the style of acting. Among the theoretical readings for the course will be writings by the avant-garde theater director Jerzy Grotowski, who had an enormous impact on Polish actors.
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  5

FRENCHST  353 - AFRICAN FILM
Patrick Mensah                                               Cap 60   
01-LEC(147755) Tu 4:00PM - 7:00PM             Bartlett Hall rm 61             Patrick Mensah
D01-DIS(14756) Th 1:00PM - 2:15PM             TBA             Staff   
D02-DIS(14757) Th 2:30PM - 3:45PM             TBA             Staff
Course taught in English.  Histories and development of African Francophone and Caribbean film, from its inception to the present day. The sociocultural, economic, and political forces and imperatives defining its forms and directions. Questions this work raises in film aesthetics and theory as a whole. Screenings and analysis of films by Sembene, Achkar, Kabore, Mweze, Cisse, Drabo, Bekolo, Teno, Peck, Palcy, Lara, Haas, and others.  (Gen.Ed. AT, G)
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  5

GERMAN 304: FROM BERLIN TO HOLLYWOOD
Barton Byg                             Cap. 150
01-LEC(17684)            TuTh 1:00-2:15pm,  Herter 227
L01-LAB(17685)            Mo 6:00-9:00pm.   Herter 227
SEE COURSE POSTER.
German cinema has played an influential role in the development of international film genres since the silent period. The so-called Golden Age of German Expressionist film, partly through the emigration of leading figures, greatly influenced Hollywood filmmaking in many genres: the Western, the gangster film, the horror film, film noir, the animated cartoon, and others. The achievements of early German cinema were also adapted for the purposes of Nazi propaganda and even for advertising. In the Cold War era, East Germany maintained its legacy of studio-based cinema while West Germany's "New German Cinema" became world-renowned for its creative synthesis of a troubled history and the profound influence of Hollywood. In a newly united Germany, as in Europe in general, film and media continue to be arenas of struggle for shaping a national identity in the context of a world media culture dominated by the U.S. Lecture / discussion / Monday screenings.  Conducted in English.  GenEd: (AT)
Undergraduate Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, V
Five College Film Studies Major Category:  5

JAPANESE  197N - 01   ST-ASIAN HOMOSEXUALITIES IN FILM & LITERATURE
Stephen Miller                         Cap 50    
01-LEC(14982)            TuTh 1:00PM – 2:15PM             Herter Hall room 205                        
An examination of male-male/female-female love/sexual themes in both pre-modern and modern times in three countries/areas: India, China/Taiwan, and Japan, through the lens of literature and films.  Taught in English.
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  TBA (see FilmStudies advisor)
Five College Film Studies Major category:  6 (component)

JUDAIC  354 - 01   JEWISH THEATRE AND FILM
Olga Gershenson             Cap 30       
01-LEC(16200)             Tu 4:00-7:00PM             Location TBA
This course tells a cultural history of Jewish theatre and Jewish film.  The topics include:  performativity in Jewish ritual; Jewish drama, characters, audiences; theatre- and film-makers.  The focus is on issues of cultural, national, and religious identity.  All readings and film excerpts are in English.
Prerequisite: JUDAIC 101 or 102 or an upper-level JUDAIC course.
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  6 (component)
           
POLISCI  201 AMERICAN POLITICS THROUGH FILM
Staff                            Cap:
01-LEC(16069): TuTh 4:00PM - 4:50PM                    Bartlett Hall room 65
D01-DIS(16081): Mo 9:05AM - 9:55AM                      TBA
D02-DIS(16082): Mo 10:10AM - 11:00AM                  TBA
D03-DIS(16083): Mo 12:20PM - 1:10PM                    TBA
D04-DIS(16615): Fr 9:05AM - 9:55AM                      TBA
D05-DIS(16616): Fr 10:10AM - 11:00AM                    TBA
D06-DIS(16617): Fr 12:20PM - 1:10PM                       TBA
D07-DIS(18024): Mo 1:25PM - 2:15PM                       TBA
D08-DIS(18025): Fr 1:25PM - 2:15PM                       TBA
D09-DIS(18026): Mo 2:30PM - 3:20PM                       TBA
Motives used to explore the development of American politics in the 20th century. The forces that shaped our politics early in the century (immigration, reform, religion), the rise of "big" government in the depression and World War II years (the new roles of the federal government, the enhanced presidency, internationalism, and anti-communism), and selected issues (race, gender, modern campaigns) prominent since the 1960s. The meaning of political democracy in America and how our understanding of it has adapted to changing times and conditions.  (Gen.Ed. HS)
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, V        
Five College Film Studies Major category:  6 (component)

SCANDIN  391E S-MYSTERY, MURDER, AND MAYHEM IN SCANDANIVIAN FICTION AND FILM                
Sherrill Harbison                     Cap: 25
01-LEC(17982)  TuTh 9:30AM - 10:45AM        Herter Hall room 212
Scandinavian literature and film have always reflected on the impact of violence and chaos in human affairs.  Today's increasingly multicultural communities complicate their reflections in unprecedented ways.
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  6 (component)

SPANISH 397W  LATIN AMERICAN FILM
José N. Ornelas                        Cap: 30
01-LEC(17892)  MW 5:00-7:30PM            location TBA
The course is designed to introduce students to the cinematic work of some of the most important Latin American directors from the sixties to the present. The course will center on a variety of topics that are vital to the understanding of the most significant political, historical, social and cultural events that have shaped Latin America. Some of the topics to be examined in the class are: racial, gender, and sexual construction; nation formation; national identity; revolution; emigration/immigration; repression; utopia; resistance; political violence; slavery and freedom; homosexuality; exile; machismo; political and social inquiry; urban violence. Students will be expected to develop interpretative filmic skills through an exploration of the connections between the technical composition of the films and the social, political, and cultural context underlying the film narrative. Films for the course will deal with the topics above.  Requirements: four short essays, mid-term exam and final paper.  Please check SPIRE for class notes and restrictions
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category: IIB, V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  5

SPAN 415-01 - CULTURE AND CIVILIZATION OF SPAIN THROUGH CINEMA: FROM DICTATORSHIP TO DEMOCRACY
Barbara Zecchi                                                            Cap: 30
01-LEX(15694)            TuTh 4:00PM-6:30PM            Herter Hall rm 118
In this class we will examine the historical, political, social and cultural development of Spain from the Second Republic to the present. Through the study of ten films we will tackle topics such as the role of women, censorship, immigration and terrorism, among others. The course is taught in Spanish.
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category: IIB, IV, V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  6 (component)

SPANISH  597T - 01   ST-CATALAN CINEMA
Barbara Zecchi            Cap: 100
01-LEC (16880)            Tu 6:30PM - 9:30PM     Herter Hall room 231
Description: TBA

 

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GRADUATE COURSES in FILM at the UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS
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See graduate course guide.