UMASS AMHERST  Film & Video Course Guide 

SPRING 2010  (updated 1/19/10)

 

Note:  This guide is a work-in-progress.  Course info may be subject to change.  We will update the website as we get more information.

 

*********************************************************************

 

ANTHRO  106 - CULTURE THROUGH FILM                             cap 264

A-LEC(51451) Tu 6:00PM - 9:00PM           Thompson Hall room 104      Kevin Anderson AD01-DIS(51452) We 10:10AM - 11:00AM      TBA    Staff   

AD02-DIS(51453) We 11:15AM - 12:05PM            TBA    Staff   

AD03-DIS(51454) We 9:05AM - 9:55AM               TBA    Staff   

AD04-DIS(51455) Th 1:00PM - 1:50PM                 TBA    Staff   

AD05-DIS(51456) Th 9:30AM - 10:20AM              TBA    Staff   

AD06-DIS(51457) Th 2:30PM - 3:20PM                 TBA    Staff   

AD07-DIS(51458) Th 4:00PM - 4:50PM                 TBA    Staff

AD08-DIS(51459) Th 7:00PM - 7:50PM                 TBA    Staff   

AD09-DIS(51460) Th 11:15AM - 12:05PM                        TBA    Staff

Exploration of different societies and cultures, and of the field of cultural anthropology through the medium of film. Ethnographic and documentary films; focus on gender roles, ethnicity, race, class, religion, politics, and social change.  (Gen.Ed. SB, G)

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  6

 

ANTHRO  497Q - 01   ST-VISUAL ETHNOGRAPHY

Kevin Anderson                                  Cap 12     1/20/10 : 5 open

57084  Th 2:30PM - 5:30PM            Lederle Grad Res Ctr rm A127            

This course examines the politics and poetics of visual representation in the field of anthropology, focusing primarily on the moving image. The design of the course introduces theoretical, methodological, and technical components of ethnographic film and video production to anthropology majors.  These three elements of ethnographic media (theory, methodology, and technology) will be taught and discussed concurrently in order to provide the students with the knowledge and skills necessary for producing ethnographic media projects during the course of the semester.  Open to Anthropology majors only on SPIRE or by instructor permission.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, IV, V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  7, 8

 

ART 297CC/597JJ  ST-DIGITAL MEDIA: TIME BASED

Rosanne Retz                          Cap 13

55016    M W 4:40PM 7:25PM         SAB 16 

Course description TBA.

Department Consent Required. Open to Undergraduate ART, BFA-ART, BFA-ART ED, and BFA-DESIGN majors only.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  8

 

ART 297Q/597Q  ST-ANIMATION FDMTLS – Course Canceled**

Patricia Galvis-Assmus          Cap 10

57349 TU TH 1:00PM 3:45PM , location TBA

Course description TBA.

Open to ART, BFA-ART, and BFA-DESIGN majors only.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  8

 

ART 397J  ST-ANIMATION II

Jed Mitchell                Cap 12         1/20/10 : 5 open

55025 M W 10:10AM 12:05PM      FAC 447          

57355 studio time TBA        

Continuation of ART 374 using Alias/Wavefront software. Class and personal projects undertaken.

Open to Undergraduate ART, BFA-ART, BFA-ART ED, and BFA-DESIGN majors only.

Prerequisite: ART 374

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  8

 

ART 491E  S-BFA SEMINAR: ANIMATION

Patricia Galvis-Assmus          Cap 12          1/20/10 : 7 open

55027  W 1:25PM 4:10PM   FAC 447

Course description TBA.

Students must also be enrolled in ART 404

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  8

 

COMM 296F:  IndStu-FILMFESTIVAL

Ciecko  306 Machmer            Cap 200        1/20/10 : 156 open

Wed 7:00-10:00pm  SOM 137

**This is a 1-credit Mandatory Pass/Fail course

Film screening.  This semester's festival colloquium will be held in conjunction with the Massachusetts Multicultural Film Festival (MMFF). To earn 1 credit (pass/fail), students are required to attend a colloquium orientation during the first week of classes and at least 7 MMFF events throughout the semester, and to complete a survey at the end of each of the screenings attended.  (Course capacity is 50)

Course Eligibility*:   All majors; no prerequisites       

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  none (1-credit, pass/fail only)

Five College Film Studies Major category:  none (1-credit, pass/fail only)

 

COMM 297S:  Special Topic-THE ACTION FILM

Shimpach  410 Machmer         Cap 300          1/20/10 : 177 open

01-LEC(51641) TuTh 9:30AM - 10:45AM Thompson Hall room 104

L01-LAB(57258)  Tu 7:00PM - 9:30PM      Hasbrouck Lab Add room 20

Lecture.  Action speaks louder than words.  It also may be easier to translate—across linguistic, cultural, national, and generational borders.  So the Action Film has been and remains an important genre for film industries around the world, allowing them to showcase budgets, effects, stars, and even ideas in a popular and profitable format.  At the same time, action films offer something essential to the movies:  spectacular movement.  This genre study course will trace a cultural history of the international action film while paying special attention to the balance between narrative and spectacle in textual analyses that also examine questions of nation, race, gender and ideology.  (Course capacity is 300).

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  4, 6

 

COMM 331:  PROGRAM PROCESS IN TELEVISION  

David Maxcy, 120 South College       Cap 36            1/20/10: 1 open

01-LEC(51526) We 10:10AM - 11:00AM    Machmer Hall W-26

L01-LAB(51583) Mo 1:25PM - 4:25PM      Herter TV Studio

L02-LAB(51584)  We 1:25PM - 4:25PM     Herter TV Studio

L03-LAB(51585) Fr 9:05AM - 12:05PM     Herter TV Studio

Lecture, studio. Introduction to concepts and techniques of television production, through lectures, lab exercises, and guided production projects.   All 3 sections will meet together once a week for a 50-minute lecture with the course director.    Each section (@12 students) will then meet once a week for a 3-hour lab session.  (Course capacity is 36)

Course Eligibility*:  Open to Senior, Junior & Sophomore Communication majors

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  8

 

COMM 342:  HISTORY OF FILM II

Norden  409 Machmer               Cap 150       1/20/10 : 22 open

01-LEC(51527) TuTh 2:30PM - 3:45PM     Herter Hall room 231

L01-LAB(51528) Tu 4:00PM - 6:00PM       Herter Hall room 231

Lecture, lab (screening), discussions.  A survey of key events and representative films that mark the history of worldwide cinema since 1950.  In addition to identifying and providing access to major works, the course is designed to facilitate the study of the various influences -- industrial, technological, aesthetic, social, cultural, and political -- that have shaped the evolution of the medium.  (Course capacity is 125)

Course Eligibility*:  Open to Seniors, Juniors and Sophomore Communication majors and others by permission of instructor.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIA, V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  2

 

COMM 397T:  Special Topic-CONTEMPORARY WORLD CINEMA

Ciecko  306 Machmer             Cap 43

01-LEC(51534) MoWe 3:35PM - 5:30PM   Machmer Hall W-26

Lecture.  This course offers an overview of recent narrative feature filmmaking from Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Latin America, and global diasporas.  Students will develop critical tools for watching, reading, and writing about international and intercultural cinema. The following types of questions will be addressed: What are the ways in which contemporary films construct images of nations and cultures?  What kinds of audio-visual representational strategies are used, and what kinds of negotiations occur? How do social, political, and economic circumstances impact the production, exhibition, and marketing/distribution of films?   How do films connect with different audiences (local and international markets for popular films, the arthouse and film festival circuit, video stores, the internet, pirates, etc.)?  What are the functions of international film stars, auteurs, and genres?  (Course capacity is 43)

Course Eligibility*:  all majors; no prerequisites

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  5, 6

 

COMM 397VV:  ST-WOMEN IN CINEMAS OF THE AFRICAN DIASPORA

Shabazz  408 Machmer                      Cap 43                 1/20/10 : 25 open

01-LEC(57273) TuTh 2:30PM - 3:45PM     Machmer Hall room W-24

Lecture, discussion.  What is an Afrocentric vision of woman and what does a woman’s vision of Africa say about being African and Black around the world? These are some of the questions explored in this course on women, identity, and Afrocentric film practices. An objective of the course is to introduce students to the evolution of African women in all aspects of the cinema as image and as image makers. This course not only explores depictions of women, but especially women of color who direct, produce, and write films within the African Diasporic world. Specifically we look at discourses about women and works by filmmakers on and off the continent of Africa that take both an historical and global approach, in terms of issues of representation and film practice. We will study the different and parallel ways these filmmakers write their own sense of identity into their works about who they are as filmmakers speaking for and about issues that may be important to women of African descent. We will look at the various political, social and cultural roles of African women in the visual media of film, video, and television and engage in critical perspectives that examine how Black and African women explore subjectivity, the body, and positionality within the Diaspora. Some of the films we will study include films from Nigeria, Algeria, France, Great Britain, and the U.S. such as Tsitsi Dangarembga’s Everyone's Child; These Hands by Flora Mbugu-Schelling; Ngozi Onwurah’s Monday's Girls; Euzhan Palcy's Rue cases nŹgres or Sugar Cane Alley; Daughters of the Dust by Julie Dash; Compensation by Zeinabu irene Davis. This course includes an evening lab and some of the films will be screened during the Massachusetts Multicultural Film Festival as a part of the Interdepartmental Program in Film Studies at the University of Massachusetts.  (Course capacity is 43).

Course Eligibility*:  Open to Senior and Junior Communication majors or by permission of instructor

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  5, 6

 

COMM 433:  ADVANCED TELEVISION PRODUCTION/DIRECTION

Maxcy  120 South College                                          Cap 10

01-LEC(51535) Tu 11:15AM - 3:15PM       Herter TV Studio

Lecture, Studio.   Intensive workshop course in advanced concepts and techniques of studio-based television production, with a focus on the direction of live programs.    Under the super¬vision of the instructor, each student will produce and direct 2 studio projects which will be aired live on HSCN Channel 15.  (Course capacity is 10)

Course Eligibility*:    Any Student

Course Prerequisite:  COMM 331 or COMM 397B

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IV, V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  8

 

COMM 441:  PRINCIPLES AND TECHNIQUES OF FILM STYLE PRODUCTION

Geisler  411 Machmer                                    Cap 12

01-LEC(51582) We 2:30PM - 6:25PM         South College room 108

Lecture, studio.  A hands-on introduction to single-camera filmmaking using digital video camcorders (electronic field production) or 16mm cameras and non-linear (computer-based) editing. Students will learn concepts of pre-production, shot composition, lighting, visual storytelling, continuity editing, and production & post production audio as they plan, shoot and edit exercises and complete projects.  A "real world" editing project (scenes from an episode of "Highlander”) will also be included.  (Course capacity is 12)

Course Eligibility*:  Open to Senior & Junior Communication majors only.

Course Prerequisites:  COMM 231 or COMM 331 or permission of instructor.

Course Notes:  Junior and Senior Communication majors who have completed either COMM 231 or COMM 331 may add this course through Spire.   Others may add only by permission of the instructor. 

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IV, V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  8

 

COMM 493J:  Seminar-AVANT GARDE & EXPERIMENTAL FILM

Anderson, K.  E32 Machmer                          Cap 20      1/20/10 : 1 open

01-SEM(57347) Mo 1:25PM - 4:25PM        South College room 108

Lecture, discussion.  This course explores the genre of Avant-Garde and Experimental Film with a critical eye toward the history and current articulations of this form of film/video production.  The course begins with an introduction to the genre, then explores Experimental Film/Video according to three different categories:  Experimentation with Narrative, Experimentation with Structure/Form, and Experimentation with the line between Fact and Fiction. Students will emerge from this course with a solid foundation in the history and theory of avant-garde and experimental film/video as evidenced by writing projects, research papers, and student-produced experimental media projects.  Student work is expected to demonstrate not only a comprehension of course materials but also reflect and expand upon filmic examples of this highly creative and challenging form of cinematic communication, art, and expression.  (Course capacity is 20)

Course Eligibility*:  Open to Senior & Junior Communication majors only.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIA, IIB, IV, V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  4, 7

 

COMM 593D: Seminar-ADVANCED SCREENWRITING

Geisler  411 Machmer                                    Cap 20     1/20/10 : 2 open

01-LEC(51650) TuTh 11:15AM - 12:30PM             South College room 108

Seminar.  Building upon the concepts learned in the introductory course (COMM 493E - Screenwriting Seminar), this class will involve an intensive workshop environment where students receive continuing, in-depth feedback on their work in progress, as they strive for professional competence in feature-length theatrical screenwriting or writing for episodic television.  Two professional screenplays and the films or TV shows produced from them will also be analyzed as students delve deeper into the writer's art and craft.  Students will complete either 60 pages of a feature length motion picture screenplay or a complete episode for an existing dramatic TV show, or two episodes for a current sitcom.  (Course capacity is 20)

Course Eligibility*:  Senior & Junior Communication majors or permission of the instructor

Course prerequisite:  COMM 493E or another college-level screenwriting course or permission of the instructor.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IV, V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  8

 

COMPLIT 382 – CINEMA AND PSYCHE

(AT) Portuges  320 Herter Hall          Cap 120

01-LEC(55210) Mo 4:40PM - 7:05PM         Thompson Hall room 106

D01-DIS(55211) Tu 2:30PM - 3:45PM        TBA    Staff   

D02-DIS(55212) Tu 2:30PM - 3:45PM        TBA    Staff   

D03-DIS(55213) Tu 1:00PM - 2:15PM        TBA    Staff   

D04-DIS(55214) Tu 1:00PM - 2:15PM        TBA    Staff

Lecture,  Discussion.  An exploration of the intersections between cinema and psychological interpretation, the course concerns the psychodynamics of reading visual texts produced in different cultures, languages, and national traditions.  This semester's focus is on comparative representations of childhood, family, gender, and war in Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe, and the West.  Among our considerations are the following: how do individual directors represent history and national identity?  In what ways do spectators from different cultural milieux and historical moments understand those representations?  what are the psychological consequences of encountering powerful images from cultures other than one's own?  How do psychoanalytic perspectives enable us to 'read' the cinematic constructions of childhood experience, especially when portrayed in situations of trauma and wartime upheaval?  Based on close reading of films, theoretical and critical essays, and interviews, our work aims to examine the often-unconscious resistances and 'mis-readings' that accompany the increasingly international world of cinema.  Requirements: Attendance; a brief oral exercise; mid-term paper, final paper.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIA, V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  6

 

COMPLIT 383 -- NARRATIVE  AVANT-GARDE FILM

(AT) Levine 328 Herter Hall                          Cap 156      1/20/10 : 28 open

01-LEC(55199) Mo 3:35PM - 7:00PM         Herter Hall room 231 Don Levine    

D01-DIS(55200) Tu 2:30PM - 3:45PM        TBA    Staff   

D02-DIS(55201) Tu 4:00PM - 5:15PM        TBA    Staff   

D03-DIS(55202) Tu 6:30PM - 7:45PM        TBA    Staff   

D04-DIS(55203) Th 2:30PM - 3:45PM        TBA    Staff   

Lecture, discussion.  Explores modern origin of experimentation in film in avant-garde modes such as Expressionism, Surrealism and contemporary results of this heritage.  Trying to determine if film is the most resolutely modern of the media.  Emphasis on the ways in which Avant-garde films can problematize themselves through the ploys of telling a story.  By means of a self-consciousness of story-telling which undermines viewer identification, the drive for closure, the demand for origins and order, and even cause and effect, these avant-garde films restore to playfulness its strength and ambiguity.  Requirements: one 5 page paper for midterm; final paper or project; attendance.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIA, V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  6

 

COMPLIT 383H/H01 -- NARRATIVE  AVANT-GARDE FILM

(AT) Levine, 328 Herter Hall             Cap 6

01-LEC(57704) Mo 3:35PM - 7:00PM         Herter Hall room 231

D01-DIS(57705) Tu 2:30PM - 5:30PM        Goodell Building room 406A

See above for general course description.  Students in COMLIT 383H may also register for COMLIT H01, a one-credit, optional, hands-on component.  The purpose is to investigate aspects of film (such as shot formation, camera movement, editing approaches).  Students will collaboratively explore a range of expressive possibilities on video.  Working in groups of four, students will alternate roles of creator/writer, camera-person, editor, etc., in constructing brief scenes.  No experience necessary.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIA, V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  6

 

COMPLIT 384 –THE VIETNAM WAR IN LITERATURE & FILM

(ALD) Gentzler 442 Herter                             Cap 66     1/20/10 :  22 open

01-LEC(57706) Tu 4:00PM - 7:00PM          Boyden Phys. Ed. Bldg room 249     

D01-DIS(57707) We 12:20PM - 1:10PM     TBA    Staff   

D02-DIS(57708) We 10:10AM - 11:00AM TBA    Staff   

D03-DIS(57709) We 11:15AM - 12:05PM   TBA    Staff

Lecture, discussion.  The study of literature and film of the Vietnam War experience teaches students to see how creative writers, translators, screen writers and filmmakers are integrally involved in the production of culture.  Students will focus on "images" of the war as presented in poetry, fiction, and film, often comparing the same image as it has been translated or adapted in literature and film.  By analyzing similarities and differences, students will learn how images are manipulated by writers to achieve calculated effects, some of which reinforce or subvert powerful cultural and political institutions.

The readings will be intertextual, ranging from traditional Vietnamese folk poetry to mainstream Hollywood films.  Texts  generally will be studied in pairs, such as Marguerite Duras' novel North China Lover and Jean-Jacques Annaud's film The Lover; or Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness and Francis Ford Coppola's Apocalypse Now.   Other authors include Michael Herr, Robert Stone, and Le Ly Hayslip; other filmmakers include Stanley Kubrick, Oliver Stone, and Trinh Minh-ha.

Critical thinking will be emphasized as students will be encouraged to identify  both calculated and unconscious shifts in the derived texts.  Students will become acquainted with a comparative methodology as well as the important role screen writers  play in facilitating cultural exchange.  Class requirements:  class  participation, a journal, and two papers.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  6 (component)

 

COMPLIT 393F: POLISH FILM

.Barbara Bolibok, 741 Herter Hall                 Cap 30    1/20/10 : 2 open

01-LEC(55209) Th 4:00PM - 7:00PM          Herter Hall Room 207

This course is an introduction to classics of Polish cinema. We will watch films by Poland’s best-known film directors to explore their key aesthetic, historical and philosophical concerns. Among directors whose works we will view are Roman Polański, Andrzej Wajda, Wojciech Has, Jerzy Stuhr, Barbara Saas, Kazimierz Kutz, Andrzej Kondriatuk, Jerzy Skolimowski, Agnieszka Holland and Krzysztof Kieślowski. Using the analytic language of literature, such as plot, character, setting, point of view, we will consider each film’s narrative content (story) as well as its formal features (its visual poetics). In our discussions of the films we will try to identify those qualities that give Polish cinematography its distinctiveness. We will also pay particular attention to the style of acting. Among the theoretical readings for the course will be writings by the avant-garde theater director Jerzy Grotowski, who had an enormous impact on Polish actors.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  5

 

COMP-LIT  499D - CAPSTONE COURSE (see COMP-LIT 383)

Don Levine                                                     Cap 10     1/20/10 : 3 open

01-IND(55173) Mo 3:35PM - 7:00PM         Herter Hall room 231          

D01-DIS(57711) Tu 2:30PM - 5:30PM        Goodell Building room 406A Staff

See COMP-LIT 383 for course details.

This course is open to Senior & Junior Honors students only.  Contact Commonwealth College Office - 504 Goodell - to add course.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIA, IV, V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  6

 

FRENCHST  353 - AFRICAN FILM

Patrick Mensah                                               Cap 60    1/20/10 : 9 open

01-LEC(55688) Tu 4:00PM - 7:00PM          Bartlett Hall room 61 Patrick Mensah

D01-DIS(55689) Th 1:00PM - 2:15PM        TBA    Staff   

D02-DIS(55690) Th 2:30PM - 3:45PM        TBA    Staff

Course taught in English.  Histories and development of African Francophone and Caribbean film, from its inception to the present day. The sociocultural, economic, and political forces and imperatives defining its forms and directions. Questions this work raises in film aesthetics and theory as a whole. Screenings and analysis of films by Sembene, Achkar, Kabore, Mweze, Cisse, Drabo, Bekolo, Teno, Peck, Palcy, Lara, Haas, and others.  (Gen.Ed. AT, G)

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  5

 

GERMAN  270 - 01   FROM THE GRIMMS TO DISNEY

Susan Cocalis                                      Cap 190     1/20/10 : 5 open

55721 TuTh 4:00PM - 5:15PM        Engineering & CmpSci II rm 119     Susan Cocalis

This course focuses on selected fairy tales of the Brothers Grimm (Hansel & Gretel, Snow White, Sleeping Beauty, Cinderella, Iron Hans) and Hans Christian Andersen (Little Sea Maid, The Red Shoes), locating them in the 19th-century German or Danish culture of their origins and then examining how they became transformed into perennial favorites of U.S. popular culture through their adaptations by Disney (feature animation films), Broadway (musicals), or bestselling self-help books (Iron John, Women Who Run With the Wolves).  As a point of comparison, this course will also introduce popular fairy-tale films of the former East Germany (GDR) from the UMass DEFA archives & library, which present the same stories as popular fare in a Cold War communist cultural context.  Conducted in English.  (Gen. Ed. AL).

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  6 (component)

 

ITALIAN  350 - 01   ITALIAN FILM

Roberto Bacci                         Cap 35

57607 MoWeFr 1:25PM - 2:40PM Herter Hall room 225 Roberto Ludovico

Course taught in English. Re-examines Italian neo-realism and the filmmakers’ project of social reconstruction after Fascism. How Italian film produces meanings and pleasures through semiotics and psychoanalysis, so as to understand the specific features of Italian cinema, its cultural politics, and the Italian contribution to filmmaking and formal aesthetics. Course taught in English.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  TBA

 

JAPANESE  197L - 01   ST-MANGA/ANIME

Bruce Baird                 Cap 100     1/20/10 : 28 open

56001 TuTh 4:00PM - 5:15PM        School of Management rm 133        Bruce Baird       

Japan has become a phenomenally successful exporter of pop culture.  This course will give students tools to understand Manga and Anime; it will investigate the role Manga and Anime play in Japan; and, it will examine ways that Manga and Anime flow from one place to another.  Course is conducted entirely in English.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  6 (component)

 

JAPANESE  197N - 01   ST-ASIAN HOMOSEXUALITIES

Stephen Miller                        Cap 50     1/20/10 : 19 open

55994 TuTh 2:30PM - 3:45PM        Herter Hall room 205 Stephen Miller           

An examination of male-male/female-female love/sexual themes in both pre-modern and modern times in three countries/areas: India, China/Taiwan, and Japan, through the lens of literature and films.  Taught in English.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  see advisor

Five College Film Studies Major category:  6 (component)

 

JUDAIC  354 - 01   JEWISH THEATRE AND FILM

Olga Gershenson         Cap 30       1/20/10 : 18 open

57544 TuTh 2:30PM - 3:45PM        Herter Hall room 113

This course tells a cultural history of Jewish theatre and Jewish film.  The topics include:  performativity in Jewish ritual; Jewish drama, characters, audiences; theatre- and film-makers.  The focus is on issues of cultural, national, and religious identity.  All readings and film excerpts are in English.

Prerequisite: JUDAIC 101 or 102 or an upper-level JUDAIC course.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  6 (component)

 

PORTUG  408 - 01   BRAZIL IN FILM&FICTION

Daphne Patai                          Cap 34

58363 TuTh 4:00PM - 6:30PM        Herter Hall room 201 Daphne Patai

Contact department for description.  (Gen.Ed. AL, G)

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, IV, V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  6 (component)

 

SPANISH 415  SPANISH CULTURE THR FILM: FROM DICTATORSHIP TO DEMOCRACY

Barbara Zecchi                                    Cap 30     1/20/10 : 2 open

61920  TuTh 4:00PM - 6:30PM  (Tuesdays: screening of the movie) Herter Hall room 210

En esta clase estudiaremos el desarrollo histórico, político, social y cultural de EspaĖa desde la II República hasta la actualidad. Con el apoyo de unas películas sobre la guerra, el franquismo y la democracia, nos concentraremos en varios temas como el papel de la mujer, la censura, la inmigración y el terrorismo, entre otros.

In this class we will examine the historical, political, social and cultural development of Spain from the Second Republic to the present. Through the study of several films we will tackle topics such as the role of women, censorship, immigration and terrorism, among others. 

Prerequisite: SPANISH 320 or 321 or 322 or 323, or consent of instructor.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, IV, V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  5

 

******************************************************************

GRADUATE COURSES in FILM at the UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS

******************************************************************

COMPLIT 695C – FASSBINDER AND GODARD

Don Eric Levine, 328 Herter Hall                               Cap 15     1/19/10 : 6 open

01-SEM(55204) We 3:35PM - 7:35PM        Herter Hall room 212

Lecture. What were Godard's early films for Fassbinder? Instead of rejecting the most influential avant-garde film maker of the sixties, Fassbinder adopted Godard as father. Yet this fathering was a highly selective progeneration. What does the juxtaposition of these film makers reveal and conceal - and not only about Fassbinder's films, since we cannot now see those of Godard without having our past  viewings of Fassbinder films in our heads.  Fassbinder sets us on track with two remarks: "Godard believes that film is the truth 24 frames per second, while I believe film is the lie 25 frames per second," and "Both Godard and I despise our characters." The course will raise theoretical issues of spectatorship, tone (irony, distanciation, citation) gender, genre, while being firmly grounded in the formal analysis of filmic text; the construction of the filmic text and its "meaning," and the destruction of subject by means of abyssal structures (mises-en-abyme, structural or metaphoric infinite regresses); Fassbinder's ideological fatigue and complex sexual politics, Godard's political innocence (which is not the same as naivete), his cinematic energy amidst his films' increasing cultural despair. Pre-requisites: familiarity with film theory and discourse, preferably by at least two courses in film analysis.  Course meets as intensive seminar, once a  week for 4  hours.  Films selected from: Why Does Herr R. Run Amok and Breathless; American Soldier and Les Carabiniers; The Bitter Tears of Petra Von Kant & Une Femme Mariée; Effie Briest & Vivre sa Vie; Beware of the Holy Whore and Contempt.

Undergraduates need instructor permission.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, IV, V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  4, 7

 

For additional graduate film courses, please see the “Graduate Course Guide” on this website.