UMASS

 

ANTHRO 106 A LEC CULTURE THROUGH FILM Cap 264

Harper,Krista M

50713 Tu 6:00PM 10:00PM Lecture Thompson 104

Discussion Sections: Cap 22 x 12 sections

50837 W 10:10AM 11:00AM TBA

50856 W 11:15AM 12:05PM TBA

50838 W 9:05AM 9:55AM TBA

50857 Th 1:25PM 2:15PM TBA

50858 Th 9:05AM 9:55AM TBA

50859 Th 10:10AM 11:00AM TBA Jian,Ge

50839 Th 4:40PM 5:30PM TBA

50840 Th 7:00PM 7:50PM TBA

50860 Th 12:20PM 1:10PM TBA

50841 F 10:10AM 11:00AM TBA

50842 F 11:15AM 12:05PM TBA

50861 F 9:05AM 9:55AM TBA

 

ANTHRO 106 B LEC CULTURE THROUGH FILM Cap 30

Page,Enoch H

W 5:00PM 9:00PM Grayson 104

Open to Orchard Hill, Central, or Northeast area RAP/TAP freshmen only.

 

ART 230 PHOTO I

Section 1 54847 Tu/Th 8-10-45AM Bartlett 51 (TBA)

Section 2 54848 TuTh 11:15-2:15PM Bartlett 51

In Photography I, we will examine the intersection of monochrome photography as art, craft and science. Special attention will be given to the fundamental tools and techniques of the photographic process, but these will serve only as a jumping off point for further artistic exploration. The issue of “meaning” will be addressed through individual and group critique, as we explore the points at which “intent” and “interpretation” converge or deviate. The course will be loose enough in structure to allow for alternative techniques and philosophies – debate will be strongly encouraged. Throughout the semester, you will begin to develop a coherent visual statement that will culminate in the final project. This project will consist of a series of black and white imagery, tightly interconnected through theme, technique, aesthetic, chronology, etc.

Pre Req: Art 110, 120& 131. Open to Undergraduate ART, BFA-ART, BFA-ART ED, and BFA-DESIGN majors only.

 

ART 231/597P PHOTO II

Christa Parravani?

TuTh 7-10PM Bartlett 51?

Photography II will emphasize the development and refinement of black and white and color technical skills, and conceptual strategies. You will learn about photo- chemistry, a variety of photographic films and papers, lighting, bleaching and toning, and hand-coloring, as well as more in-depth approaches to printmaking in relationship to class projects. The course will be organized around the production of three projects - documentary, performance for camera, and image (con)text. You can collaborate with another artist to fulfil one or more of these assignments. Throughout the course we will look at how other image-makers have approached these issues, both historically and contemporaneously, through visual lectures, readings, and discussions.

 

ART 297Q 1 STS ST-ANIMATION FDMTLS Cap 10

Staff

54861 9:05AM 12:05PM MW FineArtCtr 439

ART 397H/697 SEM: INTRO TO VISUAL CULTURE

Susan Jahoda

M lecture 3:35-5:30PM & Wed discussion 3:35-4:25PM?

Visual culture can be roughly defined as material artifacts, buildings and images, plus time-based media and performances, produced by human labor and imagination. These serve practical functions, aesthetic, symbolic, ritualistic or ideological ends, and, to a significant extent, address the sense of sight. Visual Culture Studies draws from a number of multi-disciplinary fields such as Cultural, Media and Performance Studies. In this course, we will touch upon discourses within these fields, including semiotics, structuralism, post-structuralism, feminism, political economy, post-colonialism, psychoanalytic and queer theory. Class time will be dedicated to lectures, discussions, film and video screenings.

 

ART 397J 1 STS ST-ANIMATION II Cap 12

Staff

54871 1:25PM 4:10PM M FineArtCtr 447

Studio sections: 55002 1:25PM 2:55PM W FineArtCtr 447 Cap 6

57211 2:55PM 4:25PM W FineArtCtr 447 Cap 6

Prerequisite: ART 374. Open to ART, BFA-ART, and BFA-DESIGN majors only.

 

ART 397V/697V DIGITAL MEDIA: TIME BASED

Susan Jahoda, Rosane Retz, Michael Coblyn

57212 TuTh 1:00-3:45PM Lederle A127

Focusing on the expressive manipulation of captured video and sound this course offers students the skills and concepts used in experimental digital video production. A variety of creative possibilities will be explored through the production of small-scale projects. Class requirements include attending screenings, doing independent research and readings as well as completing assigned individual projects.

Class time will involve technical demonstrations, in-class screenings of student work, discussions of project proposals, in-progress projects, and completed pieces. Students will also be expected to prepare their completed pieces for viewing on the course web site gallery page.

Prerequisite: ART 230, 271 or 397L. Open to ART, BFA-ART, BFA-ART ED & BFA-DESIGN majors only (any level).

ART 497Q/697 ADVANCED PHOTO (PHOTO 4 )

Susan Jahoda

Tu 8-10-45AM crit & Wed 7-10PM lab?

This course will involve the evolution and in ‑depth development of two projects: The first involves submitting a proposal outlining a project that will be worked on for the duration of the semester. Every week you will be expected to show work in progress. At the end of the semester this body of work will constitute your portfolio. The second project involves an in-depth class presentation called source/resource. Source/resource is about what informs your creative process. Which artists/photographers do you look at? How do the books you read influence your work? Does the food you eat, the music you listen to play a role in the work you make? In other words, you are being asked to look deeply into why and how you make pictures. Your presentation can take many forms, from a power point presentation to an on-site visit or performance. It should be coincident with the sources/resources informing your work. Presentations should be approximately 30 minutes long.

This project will constitute one third of your grade.

 

ART 597Q 1 STS ST-ANIMATION FNDMTLS Cap 2 N

Staff

54905 MW 9:05AM 12:05PM FineArtCtr 439

 

ART 697J 1 STS ST-ANIMATION II Cap 2

55023 1:25PM 4:10PM M FineArtCtr 447

Graduate Letter Grading, with options. Open to ART, BFA-ART, BFA-ART ED & BFA-DESIGN majors only (any level).

 

COMM 296F Indstu-FILM FESTIVAL Cap 100 51355

Ciecko

W 7.15PM - 10.00PM in SOM 137

Note: A one-credit pass/fail course in conjunction with the 2006

Massachusetts Multicultural Film Festival. First class meeting is Wed 1 Feb in SOM 137. Requirements: Attendance at: Wed 1 Feb introductory session, Wed 17 May final class session, and 6 screening events with completion of a survey at the end of each event (including filmmaker discussions). Most events Wednesdays, 7:15-10:30PM at UMass; some events at other Five College campuses. For course questions, contact Prof. Anne

Ciecko, 413-545-6348; ciecko@comm.umass.edu. For more detailed information about the festival program, contact the Film Studies Office,129 Herter Annex, tel: 413-545-3659; film@hfa.umass.edu. ü

 

COMM 331: PROGRAM PROCESS IN TELEVISION 51356

Staff

Course Director: David Maxcy, 120 South College

Lec 1 W 1.25PM - 2.15PM MACH E33 Maxcy Cap 36

Lab 1 M 1.25PM - 4.25PM SC 120 Staff Cap 12 51439

Lab 2 W 9.05AM - 12.05PM SC 120 Staff Cap 12 51440

Lab 3 F 9.05AM - 12.05PM SC 120 Staff Cap 12 51441

Lecture, studio. Introduction to concepts and techniques of television production, through lectures, lab exercises, and guided production projects.   All 3 sections will meet together once a week for a 50-minute lecture with the course director.    Each section will then meet once a week for a 3-hour lab session.  (Course capacity is 36)

Course Eligibility*: Senior, Junior & Sophomore COMM majors

 

COMM 342: HISTORY OF FILM II 51357

Anderson

Tu 2:30-3:45PM & 4:00-6:00PM with Wed disc sections at 10:10, 11:15, 12:20, 1:25, 9:05, 8:00AM

Lecture, lab (screening), discussion. A survey of key events and representative films that mark the history of worldwide cinema since 1950.  In addition to identifying and providing access to major works, the course is designed to facilitate the study of the various influences -- industrial, technological, aesthetic, social, cultural, and political -- that have shaped the evolution of the medium.  Requirements will include papers, assignments, and unit exams.  (Course capacity is 150 Total/6 sections @ 25)

Prerequisite: None; however, COMM 340 (History of Film I) is highly recommended

Course Eligibility*: Senior, Junior and Sophomore COMM majors

Course Notes: An honors colloquium will be offered.

 

COMM 397T: SPECIAL TOPIC-CONTEMPORARY WORLD CINEMA 51369

Ciecko 306 Machmer

MW 3.35PM - 5.30PM HERT 227/231 Cap 150

Lecture. This course will offer an overview of recent narrative feature filmmaking from Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Latin America, and indigenous/diasporic cinemas in the United States, Canada, New Zealand, and Australia. The central critical questions considered will include the following: What is the history and current status of feature filmmaking in a specific country? What social-political-economic circumstances impact the production, exhibition, and marketing/ distribution of films? When and why are films deemed “art,” and when are they considered entertainment for the masses? What are the ways in which contemporary films construct images of a nation and its cultures? How can we describe the visual style and technical elements of film? What kinds of representations are used, and how are the stories told? What sorts of languages are used? What kinds of cultural and linguistic exchanges occur within and between films? How do these films reach and how are they received by different audiences—the local and international market for popular films, the arthouse and film festival circuit, the video store? How do film stars, auteurs, and genres emerge? (Course capacity is 150)

Course Eligibility*: Any student

 

COMM 433: ADVANCED TELEVISION PRODUCTION/DIRECTION 51388

Maxcy 120 South College

TU 11.15AM - 3.15PM HERTER TV STDIO

Lecture, Studio. Intensive workshop course in advanced concepts and techniques of studio-based television production, with a focus on the direction of live programs. Under the super­vision of the instructor, each student will produce and direct 2 studio projects which will be aired live on HSCN Channel 15. (Course capacity is 10)

Course Eligibility*: Any Student

Course Prerequisite: COMM 331

 

COMM 441: PRINCIPLES & TECHNIQUES OF FILM-STYLE PRODUCTION 51438 Geisler 411 Machmer

W 2.30PM - 6.30PM SC108/9

Lecture, studio.  A hands-on introduction to single-camera filmmaking using digital video camcorders (electronic field production) or 16mm cameras and non-linear (computer-based) editing. Students will learn concepts of pre-production, shot composition, lighting, visual storytelling, continuity editing, and production & post production audio as they plan, shoot and edit exercises and complete projects.  A "real world" editing project (scenes from an episode of "Highlander" will also be included. (Course capacity is 12)

Course Eligibility*:  Senior & Junior COMM majors

Course Prerequisites: COMM 297D or COMM 331 or permission of instructor/application process.

Course Notes: Junior and Senior COMM majors who have completed either COMM 297D or COMM 331 may add this course through Spire.  Others may add only by permission of the instructor. Students who do not meet the prerequisites for this class may fill out an application available from the instructor (Office: 411 Machmer). 

 

COMM 493E: SEMINAR-SCREENWRITING 51389

Geisler 411 Machmer

TUTH 1:00-2:15PM SC 108

Lecture, discussion. An examination of the art, craft, and business of screenwriting from theo­retical and practical perspectives. Topics included: the nature of screenplay formats and struc­tures; creation and de­velopment of premise, plot, character, and action; scene writing; adap­ta­tion issues; place of the screenwriter in the collaborative process of filmmak­ing; and marketing strate­gies. The focus will be on scriptwriting for storytelling movies and, to a limited extent, TV programs. In-class activities will include exercises in visual thinking, scene analyses, and staged readings. Written work will in­clude several screenwriting projects.

(Course capacity is 20)

Course Eligibility*: Senior & Junior COMM majors

 

COMM 493F: SEMINAR-FILM DOCUMENTARY 51457

Geisler 411 Machmer

TUTH 2.30PM – 4.30PM SC 108

Lecture, discussion.  This course combines critical analysis with a hands-on introduction to pro­ducing a documentary.  Students will view analyze, and critique all or part of fifteen works by filmmakers from Robert Flaherty ("Nanook of the North") to Michael Moore ("Fahrenheit 911"), to further their understanding of the documentarian's craft and art.  Students will also do pre-production (research and scripting) on their own short documentary, along with shorter hands-on exercises in writing narration, interview techniques, use of archival sources, etc.  (Course capacity is 20)

Course Eligibility*: Senior & Junior COMM majors

Course Prerequi­site:  COMM 240 or COMM 297D or COMM 340 or COMM 342 or COMM 493E or consent of instructor.

 

COMM 497Z ST- AMERICAN CINEMA 1970s 57483

Norden

TuTh 9:30-10:45AM, Tu 4:45-6:45PM screening

Lecture, discussion, lab (screening).  This course will examine the relationship of cinema and society during an often overlooked period in U.S. history: the 1970s.  Sandwiched between the politically active 1960s and the "Greed is Good" 1980s, the 70s decade witnessed a number of strikingly important events -- most notably, the end of a long and divisive war in southeast Asia, the resignation of a U.S. President in the wake of a far-reaching political scandal, and the Supreme Court's Roe v. Wade decision that legalized abortion.  Upheavals of a different sort rocked the movie industry, including the rise of conglomerate takeovers, the growth of the "blockbuster" film (e.g., The Godfather, Jaws, Star Wars) and the exponentially increasing influence of Hollywood's first wave of college-trained filmmakers.  We will explore a range of themes and topics expressed in representative films of the time and attempt to draw connections to the socio-cultural and industrial contexts out of which these films emerged.  We will also study the films' influence during the 1970s and thereafter.  Requirements will likely include in-class presentations and essay exams.  Prerequisites: 6 hours in COMM film courses.  (Course capacity is 25)

Course Eligibility*: Senior & Junior COMM majors

 

COMM 593D SEM: ADVANCED SCREENWRITING 57485

Geisler

TuTh 11:15AM-12:30PM

Lecture, discussion. Building upon the concepts learned in the introductory course, (COMM 493E – Screenwriting Seminar), this class will involve an intensive workshop environment where stu­dents receive continuing, in-depth feedback on their work in progress, as they strive for profes­sional competence in feature-length theatrical screenwriting or writing for episodic television. Two professional screenplays and the films or shows produced from them will also be analyzed as stu­dents delve deeper into the writer’s art and craft. Students will complete either 60 pages of a feature length motion picture screenplay or a complete episode for an existing dramatic T.V. show, or two episodes for a current sitcom. (Course capacity is 20)

Course Eligibility*: Senior & Junior COMM majors

Course prerequisite: COMM 493E or another college-level screenwriting course or permission of the instructor.

 

COMP-LIT 382 CINEMA AND PSYCHE 51570

(AT) Portuges, 320 Herter Hall

Lec. M 3:35-6:00p.m.-Portuges

Dis. 1 Tu 2:30-3:45-staff 51571

Dis. 2 Tu 2:30-3:45–staff 51572

Dis. 3 Tu 4:00-5:15-staff 51573

Dis. 4 Tu 4:00-5:15-staff 51574

Lecture, Discussion. An exploration of the intersections between cinema and psychological interpretation, the course concerns the psychodynamics of reading visual texts produced in different cultures, languages, and national traditions. This semester's focus is on comparative representations of childhood, family, gender, and war in Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe, and the West. Among our considerations are the following: how do individual directors represent history and national identity? in what ways do spectators from different cultural milieux and historical moments understand those representations? what are the psychological consequences of encountering powerful images from cultures other than one's own? How do psychoanalytic perspectives enable us to 'read' the cinematic constructions of childhood experience, especially when portrayed in situations of trauma and wartime upheaval? Based on close reading of films, theoretical and critical essays, and interviews, our work aims to examine the often-unconscious resistances and 'mis-readings' that accompany the increasingly international world of cinema. Requirements: Attendance; a brief oral exercise; mid-term paper, final paper.

 

COMP-LIT 383 NARRATIVE AVANT-GARDE FILM 51626

(AT) Levine, 328 Herter Hall

Lec. M 3:35-7:00

Dis. 1 Tu 2:30-3:45 -staff 51627

Dis. 2 Tu 2:30-3:45 -staff 51628

Dis. 3 Tu 4:00-5:15 -staff 51629

Dis. 4 Tu 7:00-8:15 -staff 51630

Lecture, discussion. Explores modern origin of experimentation in film in avant-garde modes such as Expressionism, Surrealism and contemporary results of this heritage. Trying to determine if film is the most resolutely modern of the media. Emphasis on the ways in which Avant-garde films can problematize themselves through the ploys of telling a story. By means of a self-consciousness of story-telling which undermines viewer identification, the drive for closure, the demand for origins and order, and even cause and effect, these avant-garde films restore to playfulness its strength and ambiguity. Requirements: one 5 page paper for midterm, final paper or project; attendance. ü

 

COMP-LIT 383H – NARRATIVE AVANT-GARDE FILM Credits: 4 (AT) 57976

Levine, 328 Herter Hall

Lec. M 3:35-7:00 Herter 231

Dis.1 Tu 2:30-4:30

See COMLIT 383 above for general course description. Students in COMLIT 383H must also register for COMLIT H01, a one-credit, hands-on component (for a total of 5 credits). The purpose is to investigate aspects of film (such as shot formation, camera movement, editing approaches). Students will collaboratively explore a range of expressive possibilities on video. Working in groups of four, students will alternate roles of creator/writer, camera-person, editor, etc., in constructing brief scenes. No experience necessary. See instructor to register. Limited places. ü

 

COMP-LIT 391I – SPIRITUAL CINEMA: EAST/WEST 57513

Dienes, 405 Herter Hall

Lec. 7:00-10:00p.m.

Dis. 1 Tu 2:30-3:45

Lecture, discussion. An introduction to spiritual cinema, its themes and characteristics, from early to modern masters. In the context of a brief look at the cinematic achievements of such filmmakers as Bergman, Bresson, Kurosawa, Mizoguchi, Pasolini, Fellini and their philosophy of film as a spiritual art. We will focus on the art and times of the Russian film director, Audrey Tarkovsky. Of interest to students in Comparative Literature, Film, English, Art, Philosophy, History, Religion, and Russian Studies. No prerequisites, other than an open mind and a genuine interest in filmmaking that is unlike any other. No prior familiarity with the work of these directors is required. OIT computer account is required. A significant portion of the course will use resources on the Web; students will be expected to do some of the coursework electronically.

COMP-LIT 393P-RETHINKING HISTORY: NEW POLISH FILM 57518

Plesniarowicz, 411 Herter Hall

Lec. W 11:15-12:05

Lab W 3:35-5:30

The course will explore new themes in Polish film after the collapse of communism in Central and Eastern Europe when politics has gradually lost its privileged position in Polish cinema and cultural production in general. Ironic visions of history, post-modernity between the local and the global, issues of individual, national, ethnic, gender identity will be discussed based on latest works by internationally recognized filmmakers like Andrzej Wajda and Jerzy Hoffman as well as by newly-emerging figures like Juliusz Machulski, Piotr Szulkin, Wojciech Marczewski, Jan Jakub Kolski, Krzysztof Krauze, Ryszard Zatorski and Wojtek Smarzowski. Videos of major works will be analyzed and discussed.

 

COMP-LIT 499D CAPSTONE COURSE: SELF-REFLEXIVE AVANT GARDE* 51609 *Eligibility; Junior And Senior Honors Students Only

Lec. M 3:35-7:00 and TuTh 2:30-4:30

This 6-credit Capstone Course fulfills the Commonwealth college culminating- experience requirement. We apply ourselves to the problem of cinematic vision as both process and acquired skill. We learn to distinguish the ways in which Hollywood normative cinema has constructed a visual language which we accept, uncritically, as the look reality has when screened. In turn, this "look" is examined to see how it differs from what we may see with the “naked” eye, and how it informs what we, see (what we can see, what we look for) in the world. Recommended for students who have a keen interest in film. Students attend a large lecture and film screening (once a week), an intensive seminar-style section of 2-3 hours the next day, on Thursday a film-making component for 3 hours. There will be a take-home mid-term essay (six pages) and final essay (ten pages), a two page scene analysis, and an intensive final film project (20 minutes). Students investigate aspects of film-making (such as shot formation, camera movement, editing approaches) by collaboratively exploring a range of expressive -possibilities on video. Working in groups of three or four, students start off the semester alternating roles of writer/director, camera -person, editor, etc., in constructing brief scenes. No prior film experience necessary. This 6 credit course may qualify students for high Latin Honors, if they have fulfilled other specific requirements. See a Commonwealth College advisor for more information. Preference in registration given to seniors using this course toward their culminating experience requirement, others as space permits. Contact Commonwealth College 504 Goodell to register. ü

 

FRENCH 353 AFRICAN FILM 57693 (AT/D)

Mensah

Tu. 4:00p (Herter 231) and Th 1:00-2:15; 2:30-3:45p

This course will explore the theory and practice of African film through a study of its history and evolution in Francophone sub-Saharan Africa, particularly since 1960. We will study the political forces and cultural imperatives that define its forms and directions,

giving particular attention to questions of colonial domination and decolonisation, economic dependency and "development," modes of experience deemed "traditional" and "non-traditional", popular culture, themes of feminism, and the struggles surrounding sexual roles. Discussions in African film aesthetics will examine ways in which its evolving forms challenge and attempt to "correct" orthodox "Eurocentric" ways

of representing Africa. We shall also study various modes in which traditional aesthetics of orality are adapted to conventions of filmic narration.

Weekly Screenings and analysis of films by Ousmane Sembene (e.g Emitai, Ceddo, Xala, La Noire De,) Souleymane Cissé (e.g. Yeelen), Gaston Kabore (e.g. Zan Boko), Jean-Marie Teno (e.g. Afrique, Je te plumerai), Cheick Oumar Sissoko (e.g. Finzan), Idrissa Ouedraogo (Tilaï), Bassek ba Kobhio (Sango Malo), Désiré Ecaré (Visages de Femmes/Faces of Women), Mambety (Hyènes/Hyenas), and others (All screenings are in French and/or indigenous languages with English subtitles).

The class is CONDUCTED IN ENGLISH. For more information call 397-3055, 545-2314 or 545-6716 e-mail: pmensah@frital.umass.edu Office: 323 Herter

 

ITAL 350 – ITALIAN FILM: POLITICS OF PLEASURE 52615

52615

Lec 1

TU

6:00-9:00

100

15

Stone

Course taught in English. Examines history of Italian cinema and relocates origins of neorealism by means of filmic, literary, and theoretical texts. Questions explored through psychoanalysis--"politics of pleasure" (Stone). Studies problems of cultural politics with focus on writings by directors. Contemporary Italian and Italian American filmmaking contrasted with Hollywood code. Directors include: Antonioni, Bellocchio, Benigni, Bertolucci, De Sica, Fellini, Olmi, Pasolini, Pontecorvo, Rossellini, Rubini, Scola, Taviani, Tornatore, Visconti, and Lina Wertm¸ller. Cross-references with Jarmusch, Godard, and Tarkovsky et al. Theorists include Chion, Deleuze, Freud & Lacan. go to: javari.com

 

ITAL 491A – AUTEUR & FILM THEORY 57708

Lec 1

TU

2:30-5:30

50

15

Stone

Course taught in English.

To interpret contemporary film, history of film theory preconditions survey of institution of cinema in Europe and Hollywood: overview includes silent film from Russia, Germany, and France; inventions of Italian neorealism (from 1943 onwards); and formative influence on Godard and French New Wave; and on Hollywood and East Coast independent filmmakers. Directors include: Chantal Akerman, Dassin, Eisenstein, Engel & Ruth Orkin, Farberbock, Kentridge, Elisabeth Marton, Melies, Ophuls, Polonsky, Lotte Reiniger, Renoir, Resnais, Ruttmann, Sokurov, Truffaut, Vertov et al. Readings from Cahiers du cinema; Antonioni, Barthes, Bazin, Benjamin, Chion, Freud, Godard, Lacan, Rossellini, Susan Sontag et al. go to: javari.com

Cross-listed with JUDAIC 491A.—

 

57403 JAPANESE 197E 1 LEC ST-JAPANESE CINEMA Cap 100

Baird,Bruce P

11:15AM 12:05PM MWF SOM 133

 

JUDAIC 491A.—AUTEUR & FILM THEORY 57733

Lec 1

TU

2:30-5:30

50

15

Stone

Course taught in English. See description for ITAL 491A

 

 

UMASS GRADUATE COURSES IN FILM:

 

COMM 793A QUESTIONS OF NATIONAL CINEMA 57489

Ciecko

M 6:30-10:30pm SC108

 

COMP-LIT 695C MELODRAMA, FASSBINDER AND AFTER 51638

*(Open to selected undergraduates)

Levine, 328 Herter

W 2:30-6:30

Lecture. What were Godard's early films for Fassbinder? Instead of rejecting the most influential avant-garde film maker of the sixties, Fassbinder adopted Godard as father. Yet this fathering was a highly selective progeneration. What does the juxtaposition of these film makers reveal and conceal - and not only about Fassbinder's films, since we cannot now see those of Godard without having our past viewings of Fassbinder films in our heads. Fassbinder sets us on track with two remarks: "Godard believes that film is the truth 24 frames per second, while I believe film is the lie 25 frames per second," and "Both Godard and I despise our characters." The course will raise theoretical issues of spectatorship, tone (irony, dissociation, citation) gender, genre, while being firmly grounded in the formal analysis of filmic text; the construction of the filmic text and its "meaning," and the destruction of subject by means of abyssal structures (mises-en-abyme, structural or metaphoric infinite regresses); Fassbinder's ideological fatigue and complex sexual politics, Godard's political innocence (which is not the same as naivete), his cinematic energy amidst his films' increasing cultural despair. Pre-requisites: familiarity with film theory and discourse, preferably by at least two courses in film analysis. Course meets as intensive seminar, once a week for 4 hours. Films selected from: Why Does Herr R. Run Amok and Breathless; American Soldier and Les Carabiniers; The Bitter Tears of Petra Von Kant & Une Femme Mariee; Effie Briest & Vivre sa Vie; Beware of the Holy Whore and Contempt. Also, recent films by: Almodovar, and Todd Haynes. ü

 

GERMAN 697I: BRECHT AND WORLD CINEMA 57826

Prof. Barton Byg

Wed 7-10PM, screening M 7-9 at Hampshire College FilmPhoto classroom

Note: an alternate screening time may be scheduled at UMASS on Thurs evening. Investigation of the influence of the German playwright, poet and theorist Bertolt Brecht on international cinema, particularly since the 1960s. We will consider key texts on and by Brecht plus film and video works from European new waves, New German Cinema, East German cinema, Hollywood, U.S. feminist film/video, as well as Latin American and African films. Artists include: Fritz Lang, Glauber Rocha, Jean-Luc Godard, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Alexander Kluge, Wolfgang Staudte, Slatan Dudow, Yvonne Rainer, Helke Sander, Harun Farocki, Martha Rosler, Hans Juergen Syberberg, Daniele Huillet and Jean-Marie Straub. The major critical question is the continued relevance of "political modernism" in cinema. By the end of the semester, I hope to have discussed the most controversial and "unfinished" issues related to Brecht and film: "Brechtian" theory in the Cold-War era and after; Brecht's appropriation of Asian theatrical forms; Brechtian aesthetics and gender; Brecht and the "essay film;" and the question of avant-garde vs. "popular" aesthetics in film.