UNIVERSITY



ANTHROPOLOGY
U1   50823 ANTHRO 106 CULTURE THROUGH FILM
Location: Thompson 104 Time:6:30PM 10:30PM Days: Tue
Instructor: Harper,Krista M
Location: TBA Time:10:10AM 11:00AM Days: Wed  Instructor: TBA
Location: TBA Time:11:15AM 12:05PM Days: Wed  Instructor: TBA
Location: TBA Time:9:05AM 9:55AM Days: Wed  Instructor: TBA
Location: TBA Time:1:25PM 2:15PM Days: Thu  Instructor: TBA
Location: TBA Time:9:05AM 9:55AM Days: Thu  Instructor: TBA
Location: TBA Time:10:10AM 11:00AM Days: Thu  Instructor: TBA
Location: TBA Time:4:40PM 5:30PM Days: Thu  Instructor: TBA
Location: TBA Time:7:00PM 7:50PM Days: Thu  Instructor: TBA
Location: TBA Time:12:20PM 1:10PM Days: Thu  Instructor: TBA
Location: TBA Time:10:10AM 11:00AM Days: Fri  Instructor: TBA
Location: TBA Time:11:15AM 12:05PM Days: Fri  Instructor: TBA
Location: TBA Time:9:05AM 9:55AM Days: Fri  Instructor: TBA
Exploration of different societies and cultures, and of the field of cultural anthropology through the medium of film. Ethnographic and documentary films; focus on gender roles, ethnicity, race, class, religion, politics, and social change.
 
U1   55522 ANTHRO 106 CULTURE THROUGH FILM B LEC
Location: Grayson 104 Time:6:30PM 10:30PM Days: Thu
Instructor: Page,Helan-Enoch
Open to Orchard Hill & Central area freshmen only.  See course description above.

U1   59495 ANTHRO 306 VISUAL ANTHROPOLOGY 01 LEC
Location: TBA Time:2:30PM 3:45PM Days: Tue Thu
Instructor: Urla,Jacqueline L
U1   59496 ANTHRO 306 VISUAL ANTHROPOLOGY L01 LAB
Location: TBA Time: TBA Instructor: TBA
This course examines the politics and poetics of visual representation in the field of anthropology, focusing primarily, but not exclusively, on the moving image.  Many of us have our first exposure to individuals from cultures other than their own through visual images – film, photography, and tv.  In this class, we will be critically examining how information about cultural diversity is conveyed through visual images and the historical contexts and theoretical frameworks that have shaped the various ways in which “exotic” peoples were put on display, we will look at the implicit evolutionary paradigms that informed early uses of photography for classifying racial types. From there, we will turn to a survey of classic and contemporary ethnographic film.  Students will be asked to examine a variety of documentary, observational, and experimental styles in both ethnographic film and “indigenous media”, and to consider how relations of power and authority are embodied in both form and content.  We will also look at recent attempts by native peoples to produce their own television and video as a way of resisting western-imposed media and protecting a sense of their cultural identities.  Our overall goal will be to better understand how and under what conditions visual images contribute to anthropology’s project of fostering meaningful cross-cultural communication.  Attendance, journal, exams.  Prerequisite: ANTH 104 or 106 or consent of instructor.

ART
U1   50967 ART 230 PHOTOGRAPHY I 1 STS
Location: Bartlett 51 Time:8:00AM 10:45AM Days: Tue Thu
Instructor: Bowler,Kristen Pamela
U1   50968 ART 230 PHOTOGRAPHY I 2 STS
Location: Bartlett 51 Time:11:15AM 2:10PM Days: Tue Thu
Instructor: Signore,Victor R.
This course is open to Undergraduate ART, BFA, BFA ED, and BFADES majors only.
Introduction to photographic tools and methods. The balance between self-inquiry and the importance of process and materials as vehicles of meaning. Theory explored through class critiques and slide presentations. Photography examined and discussed both from a personal point of view and in its wider cultural context.

U1   50969 ART 231 PHOTOGRAPHY II 1 STS
Location: Bartlett 51 Time:9:05AM 3:00PM Days: Fri
Instructor: Poirier,Cynthia D.
In-depth exploration of techniques and materials including zone system, large format, and non-silver processes. Slide lectures, discussions, and readings. Prerequisite: ART 230 or consent of instructor

U1   50977 ART 271 INT COMP IN FINE ART 1 STS
Location: FineArtCtr 444 Time:1:25PM 4:10PM Days: Mon Fri  Instructor: Claveloux,Eileen  Undergraduate, Graduate students with majors in ART, BFA, BFA-ED, or BFADES only. Historical overview of the development of computer art and the significant events leading to the development of the field. Projects include hands-on experience with computer imaging for use in the creation of fine art. Prerequisite: completion of foundation courses or consent of instructor.

U1   50978 ART 271 INT COMP IN FINE ART 2 STS
Location: FineArtCtr 444 Time:1:25PM 4:10PM Days: Mon Wed  Instructor: Claveloux,Eileen
U1   58753 ART 297H ST-INTRO VISUAL CULTRURE 1 LEC
Location: TBA Time:9:05AM 11:05AM Days: Tue Thu
Instructor: Jahoda,Susan Eve
Visual culture can be roughly defined as material artifacts, buildings and images, plus time-based media and performances, produced by human labor and imagination. These serve practical functions, aesthetic, symbolic, ritualistic or ideological ends and, to a significant extent, address the sense of sight.  The term Visual Culture Studies arises from a number of interdisciplinary fields which include Critical Theory, Cultural Studies, Deconstruction, Feminism, Film Studies, Media Studies, Political Economy, Post-Colonial Studies, Post-Structuralism, Psychoanalytic Theory, Queer Theory, Performance Studies, and Semiotics. Throughout the semester we will touch upon theories from these various disciplines as a way to critically understand what constitutes Visual Culture. Divided into a series of interconnected sections including: Locating the Postmodern, Deconstruction, and The Emergence of the "Subject" in Identity Politics, material will be examined through lectures, readings, discussion, film and video screenings.  It is your responsibility to prepare the weekly readings for discussion, screen the films and videos, complete exams and papers, and keep a notebook/journal which includes notes and responses to each reading, and prepared questions for discussion section.

U1   50982 ART 297Q ST-ANIMATION FDMTLS 1 STS
Location: FineArtCtr 439 Time:9:05AM 11:50AM Days: Tue Thu  Instructor: Benn,Janet A
With studio.  Introduction to methods and techniques of animation, as well as history of experimental film.  Hands-on work with object, sand, line, and clay animation among others.  Basic audio and video skills. Students develop projects of their own design resulting in a fully edited videotape of their work.  Pre-requisite:  ART 271 or consent of the instructor. Must have taken ART 271. Pre Requisite: Art 271
BFA "CG" Track majors only.

U1   50990 ART 375 ELCTRNC STILL PHOTOG 1 STS
Location: FineArtCtr 444 Time:11:15AM 2:15PM Days: Tue Thu  Instructor: TBA
This course is open to ART, BFA, and BFADES majors only.
With studio. Aspects of image processing in the context of electronic still photography. Topics include: image acquisition, image enhancement, image analysis, spatial and color transformation, image display and recording. Students develop images and algorithms for display on various devices. Prerequisites: ART 271 and ART 230 or consent of instructor.

U1   50995 ART 397J ST-ANIMATION II 1 STS
Location: FineArtCtr 447 Time:1:25PM 4:10PM Days: Mon  Instructor: Benn,Janet A
U1   56437 ART 397J ST-ANIMATION II L1 LAB
Location: FineArtCtr 447 Time:1:25PM 3:20PM Days: Wed  Instructor: Benn,Janet A
U1   58836 ART 397J ST-ANIMATION II L2 LAB
Location: FineArtCtr 447 Time:3:30PM 5:30PM Days: Wed  Instructor: Benn,Janet A

U1   59350 ART 497J ST-ADV VIDEO PRODUCTION 01 STS
Location: Machmer E-30D Time:1:25PM 5:25PM Days: Wed  Instructor: Miller,Elizabeth L.
(CROSSLISTED w/ COMM 497J see COMM course description) Application process and instructor’s permission required.  Beginning Monday 14 April 2003, applications are available in the Film Studies office, 101 South College.  Tel. 545-3659.  Application deadline is Friday 18 April 2003.  Students will be selected to enroll from the applications submitted.  Course is open to Five College students.  Course capacity: 12

COMMUNICATION
U1   55579 COMM 240 MODES OF FILM COMM 1 LEC
Location: Herter 227 Time:9:30AM 10:45AM Days: Tue Thu
Instructor: Norden,Martin F
U1   55603 COMM 240 MODES OF FILM COMM L1 LAB
Location: Herter 227 Time:6:30PM 8:30PM Days: Tue
Instructor: Norden,Martin F
The nature and functions of film, including narrative and non-narrative approaches to film communication.  Topics will include: the components of film expression (composition, movement, editing, sound, directing, and acting); designs in screen narrative; film's relationship to other arts and media; and its role as an instrument of social reflection and change. This course is open to Communication majors only.   (Course capacity is 150) Note: a limited number of students who are NOT UMASS Communication majors may add this course by completing an ADD form in the Film Studies office in 101 South College.

U1   51697 COMM 296F Indstu-FILM FESTIVAL 1 IND
Location: SOM 137 Time:7:30PM 10:00PM Days: Wed  Instructor: Ciecko,Anne
This is a 1-credit mandatory pass/fail course for participation in the 11th Annual Massachusetts Multicultural Film Festival. You must attend a minimum of 8 of the Festival presentations and complete a short response paper on each program attended. Most events will be on Wednesdays, 7:30-10:00PM at UMass, however, a few films will be presented at other Five College campuses. For more detailed information, contact the Film Studies Office, 101 South College. Tel: 413-545-3659. The Festival begins Wed., Feb. 11.

331:  PROGRAM PROCESS IN TELEVISION
U1   51699 COMM 331 Program Proc In Tv 1 LEC
Location: Machmer E-33 Time:1:25PM 2:15PM Days: Wed  Instructor: Maxcy,David J.
U1   56325 COMM 331 Program Proc In Tv L1 LAB
Location: SouthCollg 120 Time:1:25PM 4:25PM Days: Mon  Instructor: TBA
U1   56326 COMM 331 Program Proc In Tv L2 LAB
Location: TBA Time:9:05AM 12:05PM Days: Wed  Instructor: TBA
U1   56327 COMM 331 Program Proc In Tv L3 LAB
Location: TBA Time:9:05AM 12:05PM Days: Fri  Instructor: TBA
Course Director:  David Maxcy, 120 South College
Lecture, studio. Introduction to concepts and techniques of television production, through lectures, lab exercises, and guided production projects.   All 3 sections will meet together once a week for a 50-minute lecture with the course director.    Each section will then meet once a week for a 3-hour lab session.  (Course capacity is 36 Total/3 sections @12).  Course Eligibility*:  Senior & Junior COMM majors

342:  HISTORY OF FILM II
U1   51700 COMM 342 HISTORY OF FILM II 1 LEC
Location: Thompson 104 Time:2:30PM 3:45PM Days: Tue  Instructor: Anderson,Carolyn Location: SouthCollg 108 Time:9:05AM 9:55AM Days: Wed  Instructor: TBA
Location: SouthCollg 108 Time:10:10AM 11:00AM Days: Wed  Instructor: TBA
Location: SouthCollg 108 Time:11:15AM 12:05PM Days: Wed  Instructor: TBA
Location: SouthCollg 108 Time:12:20PM 1:10PM Days: Wed  Instructor: TBA
Location: SouthCollg 108 Time:1:25PM 2:15PM Days: Wed  Instructor: TBA
Location: Thompson 104 Time:4:00PM 6:00PM Days: Tue  Instructor: Anderson,Carolyn Anderson  308 Machmer
Lecture, screening, discussion.  A survey of key events and representative films that mark the history of motion pictures since 1950 world-wide.  In addition to identifying and providing access to major works, the course is designed to facilitate the study of the various influences-- industrial, technological, aesthetic, social, cultural, and political--that have shaped the evolution of the medium, with a particular emphasis on film in the United States.  Three unit exams and 2 short papers.  (Course capacity is 125 Total/5 sections @ 25) Course Eligibility*:  COMM majors  Course Notes:  An honor’s colloquium will be offered

397T:  SPECIAL TOPIC-CONTEMPORARY WORLD CINEMA
Ciecko  306 Machmer
U1   51716 COMM 397T ST-Cntmp Wrld Cinema 1 LEC
Location: Herter 227 Time:3:35PM 5:30PM Days: Mon Wed  Instructor: Ciecko,Anne T
Lecture & screenings.  This course offers an overview of recent narrative fiction feature filmmaking from Africa, the Middle East, Asia, Latin America, and a variety of indigenous/diasporic cinemas. As we situate and study cinema in national, transnational, and global contexts, we will explore political, social, and economic circumstances that impact the production, exhibition, marketing, distribution, and reception of films. We will address the ways contemporary films construct images of nations, nationalism, and national culture(s). Other issues to be considered include the following: the relationship between cinema and discourses of development; the means by which contemporary films are labeled art and/or entertainment for the masses; the impact of new technologies; cultural and linguistic exchanges; the rise of international co-productions; policies, funding, and the relationship between governments and industries; the means by which films reach and are received by different audiences; and the cultural value of stars, auteurs, and genres. Feature films and clips will be regularly screened and analyzed using tools of film criticism and cultural studies. The class will combine lectures, screenings, discussions, group activities, and individual assignments.  (Course capacity is 150).  Course Eligibility*:    Seniors & Juniors

433:  ADVANCED TELEVISION PRODUCTION/DIRECTION
Maxcy  120 South College
U1   51735 COMM 433 Adv Tv Prod Direct 1 LEC
Location: SouthCollg 120 Time:11:15AM 3:15PM Days: Tue  Instructor: Maxcy,David J.  U1   51736 COMM 433 Adv Tv Prod Direct L1 LAB
Location: SouthCollg 120 Time:1:00PM 3:00PM Days: Thu  Instructor: Maxcy,David J.
Lecture, Studio.   Intensive workshop course in advanced concepts and techniques of studio-based television production, with a focus on the direction of live programs.    Under the supervision of the instructor, students will produce individual projects in a variety of genres which will be aired on local cable television outlets.  (Course cap is 10) Course Eligibility*: Any Student Course Prerequisite:  COMM 331

441:  PRINCIPLES AND TECHNIQUES OF FILM-STYLE PRODUCTION
Geisler  411 Machmer
U1   56264 COMM 441 Prin&Tech Film Styl 1 LEC
Location: SouthCollg 108 Time:2:30PM 6:30PM Days: Wed  Instructor: Geisler,Bruce H
Lecture, studio.  A hands-on introduction to single-camera filmmaking using 16mm film cameras and/or video camcorders (electronic field production) and non-linear (computer-based) editing. Students will learn concepts of pre-production, shot composition, lighting, visual storytelling, continuity editing, and production & post production audio as they plan, shoot and edit exercises and complete projects.  A "real world" editing project may also be included. (Course capacity is 12).  Course Eligibility*:  Application process and permission of instructor is required.  Students cannot add this course through SPIRE.
Course Prerequisite:  Application process and permission of instructor is required.  Course Notes:  Tuesday, November 4, 2003, applications will be available outside Professor Geisler’s office, Machmer 411.  Application deadline is Tuesday, November 18, 2003.  Students will be selected to enroll from the applications submitted.  Preference is given to COMM Seniors. COMM 297D highly recommended. This course was formerly numbered and titled COMM 341-Principles and Techniques of Filmmaking.  Students who have already taken COMM 341 cannot take this course.

444:  FILM STYLES AND GENRES: SCREEN SATIRE
Stromgren  412 Machmer
U1   55891 COMM 444 Film Styles & Genres 1 LEC
Location: SouthCollg 108 Time:4:00PM 5:45PM Days: Tue Thu  Instructor: Stromgren,Richard LLecture, discussion.  The nature and function of screen satire in theory, and practice.  Focus on how irony, parody, spoof, caricature, and other forms of comic wit have been employed by key directors in satiric observations of social institutions, practices, and thought.  Requirements: class reports, individual research projects, and 2 exams.  (Course capacity is 25)Course Eligibility*:    Senior & Junior COMM majors
Course Prerequisite:  COMM 240 or COMM 340 or consent of instructor.

493E:   SEMINAR-SCREENWRITING
Norden  409 Machmer
 U1   51737 COMM 493E Sem-Screenwriting 1 SEM
Location: SouthCollg 108 Time:2:30PM 3:45PM Days: Tue Thu  Instructor: Norden,Martin FLecture, discussion.  An examination of the art, craft, and business of screenwriting from theoretical and practical perspectives.  Topics included: the nature of screenplay formats and structures; creation and development of premise, plot, character, and action; scene writing; adaptation issues; place of the screenwriter in the collaborative process of filmmaking; and marketing strategies.  The focus will be on scriptwriting for storytelling movies and, to a limited extent, TV programs.  In-class activities will include exercises in visual thinking, scene analyses, and staged readings.  Written work will include several screenwriting projects.  (Course capacity is 20)Course Eligibility*:    Senior COMM majors

493F:  SEMINAR-FILM DOCUMENTARY
Geisler  411 Machmer
U1   58797 COMM 493F Sem-Film Documentary 1 SEM
Location: SouthCollg 108 Time:2:30PM 3:45PM Days: Tue Thu  Instructor: Geisler,Bruce H
Lecture, discussion.  This course combines critical analysis with a hands-on introduction to producing a documentary.  Students will view analyze, and critique all or part of fifteen works by filmmakers from Robert Flaherty (“Nanook of the North”) to Michael Moore (“Bowling for Columbine”), to further their understanding of the documentarian’s craft and art.  Students will also do pre-production (research and scripting) on their own short documentary, along with shorter hands-on exercises in writing narration, interview techniques, use of archival sources, etc.  (Course capacity is 20).  Course Eligibility*:    Senior & Junior COMM majors.  Course Prerequisite:  COMM 240 or COMM 297D or COMM 340 or COMM 342 or COMM 493E or consent of instructor.

497J:  SPECIAL TOPIC-ADVANCED VIDEO PRODUCTION
Miller  (5-College)
U1   51741 COMM 497J ST-Adv Video Prodctn 1 LEC
Location: Machmer E-30D Time:1:25PM 5:25PM Days: Wed  Instructor: Miller,Elizabeth L.
Lecture, studio. This advanced video production course is open to five college students who have a solid understanding of basic video production.  In a seminar/studio environment, students will have an opportunity to explore advanced aspects of the medium including proposal development/fundraising, digital editing, sound recording, advanced cinematography, and distribution for finished work. Through in-class critiques and the viewing and discussion of film and video, students will look and think critically about the construction of the moving image and the creative use of sound.  Weekly screenings and readings will be geared towards documentary work but will also include video art to explore a range of visual strategies and aesthetic approaches to video making.  Application process and permission of instructor required.  (Course capacity for COMM students is 4).  Course Eligibility*:  Application process and permission of instructor is required.  Students cannot add this course through SPIRE.  Course Prerequisite:  Application process and permission of instructor is required.  Course Notes:  Beginning Tuesday, November 4, 2003, applications are available in the Film Studies Office, 101 South College (TEL:  545-3659), UMASS.  Application deadline is Friday, November 21, 2003.  Students will be selected to enroll from the applications submitted.  Students selected to enroll in COMM 497J/ART 497J must also register for COMM 296F: Indstu-Film Festival (1-credit, Mandatory Pass/Fail course).  Limited course capacity.   Course is cross-listed with ART 497J.

497N:  SPECIAL TOPIC–ASIAN POPULAR CINEMA
Ciecko 306 Machmer
U1   58801 COMM 497N ST-Asian Pop Cinema 1 LEC
Location: SouthCollg 108 Time:6:00PM 9:30PM Days: Tue  Instructor: Ciecko,Anne T
Lecture, discussion, screening.  This course studies popular cinema from Asia and the Asian diasporas, with a special emphasis on questions of genre and gender. Focusing primarily on specific contextual issues of production, exhibition, distribution, and reception, our study of narrative fiction feature films will be comparative, cross-cultural, and interdisciplinary. Film genres to be considered include the following: historical epic/biopic; musicals (including Hindi “masala” movies), comedy, melodrama, romance, martial arts/ swordplay/ samurai films, horror and thriller, sci-fi and fantasy (especially Japanese anime), urban gangster/action films, and “exploitation” genres. Critical and theoretical course readings from film studies and cultural studies will likely deal with questions of the national, transnational, and global; audience/reception studies; stardom and fan culture; feminism, gender studies, and queer theory; genre studies; auteur theory; Asia/Pacific/America studies; postcolonialism and issues of “hybridity”; theories of globalization and diaspora.   (Course capacity is 10).  Course Eligibility*:  Senior and Junior COMM majors or permission of instructor is required.  Course Notes:  There are no specific prerequisites but some background in film studies and/or cultural theory is recommended.

593D: SEMINAR-ADVANCED SCREENWRITING
Geisler  411 Machmer
U1   58804 COMM 593D S-Advanced Screenwriting 1 LEC
Location: SouthCollg 108 Time:11:15AM 12:30PM Days: Tue Thu  Instructor: Geisler,Bruce H
Lecture, discussion.  Building upon the concepts learned in the introductory course, (COMM 493E – Screenwriting Seminar), this class will involve an intensive workshop environment where students receive continuing, in-depth feedback on their work in progress, as they strive for professional competence in feature-length theatrical screenwriting or writing for episodic television.  Two professional screenplays and the films or shows produced from them will also be analyzed as students delve deeper into the writer’s art and craft.  Students will complete either 60 pages of a feature length motion picture screenplay or a complete episode for an existing dramatic T.V. show, or two episodes for a current sitcom.   (Course capacity is 20)Course Eligibility*:  Senior COMM majors Course prerequisite:  COMM 493E or another college-level screenwriting course or permission of the instructor.

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE
U1   51651 COMP-LIT 381 Slfre Avant-Grd Film 1 LEC
Location: Herter 231 Time:3:35PM 7:00PM Days: Mon  Instructor: Levine,Don Eric
Location: TBA Time:2:30PM 3:45PM Days: Tue  Instructor: TBA
Location: TBA Time:2:30PM 3:45PM Days: Tue  Instructor: TBA
Location: TBA Time:4:00PM 5:15PM Days: Tue  Instructor: TBA
Location: TBA Time:7:00PM 8:15PM Days: Tue
Explores modern origin of film experimentation in avant-garde modes such as Expressionism, Surrealism, and contemporary results of this heritage. Trying to determine if film is the most resolutely modern of the media, we’ll look at cinema as the result of two obsessive concerns: 1) the poetic, dreamlike, and fantastic, 2) the factual, realistic, and socially critical or anarchistic. Thus, we’ll attempt to discover how modern culture deals with avant-garde imperatives to always “make it new.” Films and film-makers such as Breathless (Godard). Lang, My Own Private Idaho, The American Soldier (Fassbinder), others. Requirements: one 5 page paper for the midterm, ten page final paper or project; attendance.

U1   58956 COMP-LIT 381H Slfre Avant-Grd Film 1 LEC
Location: Herter 231 Time:3:35PM 7:00PM Days: Mon  Instructor: Levine,Don Eric  U1   58957 COMP-LIT 381H Slfre Avant-Grd Film D1 DIS
Location: TBA Time:2:30PM 5:30PM Days: Tue  Instructor: TBA
We apply ourselves to the problem of vision as an acquired skill, learning to distinguish the ways Hollywood normative cinema has constructed a visual language which we accept, uncritically, as how reality appears on the screen. This language is examined- how what it presents differs from what we see with the “naked” eye and how it, in turn, forms what we see (what we can see, what we look for) in the world. Various types of avant-garde film are examined so that we come to imagine how it might be otherwise (films by directors such as Dreyer, Lang, Man Ray, Buñuel, Vertov, Godard, Fassbinder, Egoyah, Van Sant). Student attend a large lecture and film screening (once a week) and, the next day an intensive seminar-style section of 2-3 hours. Here we present and discuss new material, some from readings, and, occasionally, screening of additional films and film clips. The course is incremental and there is thus an absolute attendance requirement. There will be a take-home mid-term essay (5 pages) and final essay (10 pages), a two-page scene analysis, and an approved self-directed project. This course differs from ComLit 381 in the length of the section (2-3 hours per week instead of 75 minutes), extra work-load and additional readings. Recommended only for students (at all levels) who have been interested in film. There is a required hands on film-making colloquium for one extra credit- a total of 5 credits. Limited space- priority to Honors students.   Note:  Wait list students should attend 1st class.

U1   58966 COMP-LIT H06 Hnrs Col Comlit 381H 1 SEM
Location: TBA Time:2:30PM 4:30PM Days: Thu  Instructor: Levine,Don Eric
Students must also be enrolled in COMLIT 381H. In this 1-credit hands-on studio component to COMLIT 381H, the aim is to investigate aspects of film (such as shot formation, camera movement, editing approaches) by making a series of short films. Students will collaboratively a range of expressive possibilities on video. Working in groups of three or four, students will alternate roles of writer/director, camera person, editor, etc. in constructing brief scenes. No experience necessary.

U1   51656 COMP-LIT 382 Cinema And Psyche 1 LEC
Location: SOM 137 Time:3:35PM 6:35PM Days: Mon  Instructor: Portuges,Catherine
Location: TBA Time:2:30PM 3:20PM Days: Tue  Instructor: TBA
Location: TBA Time:2:30PM 3:20PM Days: Tue  Instructor: TBA
Location: TBA Time:4:00PM 4:50PM Days: Tue  Instructor: TBA
Location: TBA Time:4:00PM 4:50PM Days: Tue  Instructor: TBA
An exploration of the intersections between cinema and psychological interpretation, the course concerns the psychodynamics of reading visual texts produced in different cultures, languages, and national traditions.  This semester's focus is on comparative representations of childhood, family, gender, and war in Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe, and the West.  Among our considerations are the following: how do individual directors represent history and national identity?  in what ways do spectators from different cultural milieux and historical moments understand those representations?  what are the psychological consequences of encountering powerful images from cultures other than one's own?  How do psychoanalytic perspectives enable us to 'read' the cinematic constructions of childhood experience, especially when portrayed in situations of trauma and wartime upheaval?  Based on close reading of films, theoretical and critical essays, and interviews, our work aims to examine the often-unconscious resistances and 'mis-readings' that accompany the increasingly international world of cinema.  Requirements: Attendance; a brief oral exercise; mid-term paper, final paper

U1   51662 COMP-LIT 391A S- Spirit Cinema:E/W 1 LEC
Location: TBA Time:2:30PM 3:20PM Days: Wed  Instructor: Dienes,Laszlo
U1   51661 COMP-LIT 391A S- Spirit Cinema:E/W L1 LAB
Location: TBA Time:7:00PM 10:00PM Days: Tue  Instructor: Dienes,Laszlo
An  introduction to spiritual cinema, its theme and characteristics, from early to modern masters.  In the context of a brief look at the cinematic achievements of such filmmakers as Bergman, Bresson, Kurosawa, Mizoguchi, Pasolini, Fellini and their philosophy of film as a spiritual art.  We will focus on the art and times of the Russian film director, Audrey Tarkovsky.  Of interest to students in Comparative Literature, Film, English, Art, Philosophy, History, Religion, and Russian Studies.  No prerequisites, other than an open mind and a genuine interest in filmmaking that is unlike any other.  No prior familiarity with the work of these directors is required. Comparative Literature and Russian majors and graduate students will be expected to do some research in a foreign language.  (SAME AS ENGLISH 391E)

U1   56416 COMP-LIT 499D Capstone Course 1 IND Open
Location: Herter 231 Time:3:35PM 7:00PM Days: Mon  Instructor: Levine,Don Eric  Location: TBA Time:2:30PM 5:30PM Days: Tue  Instructor: TBA
Location: TBA Time:2:30PM 4:30PM Days: Thu  Instructor: TBA
(SEE Description of Complit 381H)

Graduate Class
U1  18753 COMP-LIT 694A S-FASSBINDER&GODARD AND MELODRAMA 1 SEM Capacity:15
Location: Herter 211 Time:2:30PM 6:30PM Days: Wed  Instructor: Levine,Don Eric
What were Godard’s early films for Fassbinder? Instead of rejecting the most influential avant-garde filmmaker of the sixties, Fassbinder adopted Godard as father. Yet, this fathering was a highly selective progeneration. What does the juxtaposition of these filmmakers reveal and conceal- and not only about Fassbinder’s films, since we cannot see those of Godard  without having our past viewings of Fassbinder films in our heads. Fassbinder sets us on track with two remarks: “Godard believes that film is the truth 24 frames per second, while I believe film is the lie 25 frames per second,” and “Both Godard and I despise our characters.” The course will raise theoretical issues of spectatorship, tone (irony, distanciation, citation) gender, genre, while being firmly grounded in the formal analysis of filmic text; the construction of the filmic text and its “meaning,” and the destruction of subject by means of abysmal structures (mises-en
abyme, structural, or metaphoric infinite regresses); Fassbinder’s ideological fatigue and complex sexual politics, Godard’s political innocence (which is not the same as naivete), his cinematic energy amidst his films’ increasing cultural despair. Qualified Undergraduates by permission only.  Please leave a message including your name, Spire ID, class year, major, and contact info for Prof. Levine in Comparative Literature dept (S. College) to enroll. Prerequisites: familiarity with film theory and discourse, preferably by at least two courses in film analysis. Course meets as intensive seminar, once a week for 4 hours. Films selected from: Why Does Herr R. Run Amok &  Breathless; American Soldier & Les Carabiniers; The Bitter Tears of Petra Von Kant & Une Femme Mariee; Effie Briest & Vivre sa Vie; Beware of the Holy Whore and Contempt.

ENGLISH
U1   59377 ENGLISH 391E S-Spiritual Cinema: E/W 01 SEM
Location: TBA Time:2:30PM 3:20PM Days: Wed  Instructor: Dienes,Laszlo
U1   59378 ENGLISH 391E S-Spiritual Cinema: E/W L01 LAB
Location: TBA Time:7:00PM 10:00PM Days: Tue  Instructor: Dienes,Laszlo
(Same as Complit 391A)

Related ENGLISH courses: (will NOT count towards UMASS film certificate)
ENGLISH 291B-Lab SHAKESPEARE ON FILM 59628  Instructor: K. Farrell W 7:00 - 9:30 pm
A film series which screens performances of Shakespeare's plays once a week. For students enrolled in English 221. Students in 221 who sign up for the series receive 1 credit, and may arrange with the instructors to do some Independent writing about Shakespeare and film for further credit. Students not in 221 may add the course for 1 or more credits with permission of the instructor.

ENGLISH 297G EXPERIMENTAL WRITING WORKSHOP 59371 Instructor: D. Coudriet & K. Westhoff Tu 4:00 - 6:30 pm
Mandatory Pass/Fail 3-credit course. Screenwriting and Film as Narrative Art. It is no news that Hollywood films are often crafted around a what-will-sell formula. But at what cost to the creative process of screenwriting? This workshop-intended for the beginning screenwriter-will seek first to define the "formula" and then to demonstrate ways in which the narrative art, subversion, and creativity may still be possible in screenwriting.
 

GERMAN
U1   56937 GERMAN 270 FROM GRIMM TO DISNEY 01 LEC
Location: Thompson 102 Time:4:00PM 5:15PM Days: Tue Thu
Instructor: Cocalis,Susan L
The Brothers Grimm fairy tales, first collected in the early 19th century and including such well-known tales as Snow White, Cinderella, Rumpelstiltskin, and Little Red Riding Hood. Modern social, feminist, and psychoanalytical interpretations of the tales; the Grimms and their theories of folk literature; the origins and sources of the tales; and their modern reception and adaptation as children's tales and adults' literature and film. Conducted in English. (Gen.Ed. AL)

U1   59599 GERMAN 597F ST-LITERATURE AND FILM 01 LEC
Location: TBA Time:11:15AM 12:30PM Days: Tue Thu
Inspired by the film "ADAPTATION", the seminar will explore the problems posed by film adaptation of prose fiction, especially the compulsion toward narrative.  This is particularly striking since modernist fiction so stridently moves in teh opposite direction, toward narrative fragmentation and documentary approaches.  Looking back on the selections of novels and films below, it becomes apparent to me that the course will have a feminist tone, since so much of the work deals with female identity -- either as a social construct or as a structure for narrative experimentation itself.  In short, we will try to explore the meaning of Flaubert's claim, "Madame Bovary, c'est moi!"  Tentative list of titles (books available at Amherst Books, Main Street, Amherst):  Adaptation/ The Orchid Thief; The Hours/ Mrs. Dalloway; The Piano Teacher/Death in Venice; Dracula/ Nosferatu: A Symphony of Horror; Madame Bovary (Renoir film); The Handmaid's Tale; Billiards at Half Past Nine / Not Reconciled, or Amerika (Kafka: "The Stoker")/ Class Relations
Requirements:  strictly faithful attendane and participation; journal entries; paper at end of semester (no extensions).  Advanced undergrads by permission only.

ITALIAN
U1   52759 ITALIAN 350 Italian Film 1 LEC
Location: Herter 227 Time:2:30PM 5:30PM Days: Tue  Instructor: Stone,Jennifer A.Re-examines Italian neo-realism and the filmmakers' project of social reconstruction after Fascism. How Italian film produces meaning and pleasures through semiotics and psychoanalysis, as a means to understand the specific features of Italian cinema, its cultural politics, and the Italian contribution to filmmaking. Taught in English

JAPANESE
U1   59254 JAPANESE 190B Japanese Fiction Through Film 1
Location: HasLabAdd 124 Time:2:30PM 3:45PM Days: Tue Thu  Instructor: Holman,Martin  Location: SOM 137 Time:6:30PM 8:30PM Days: Tue  Instructor: TBA
Interested in Samurai? Geisha? Anime? Sushi? Judo? Futons? Toyota trucks? Karaoke? Zen?  How about literature and cinema?  Indulge your taste for Japan in this new class.  A study of Japanese literature and its transformation from book to screen.  No knowledge of Japanese is necessary.  All readings are in English. For more information contact Martin Holman, Asian Lang & Lit, 329 Herter, 545-4953, Email: mholman@asianlan.umass.edu

Related Japanese course (does not count towards UMASS Film Certificate)
U1   56698 JAPANESE 143 Lit-Classical & Medieval 1 LEC
Location: Morrill II 131 Time:9:05AM 9:55AM Days: Mon Wed Fri  Instructor: Forrest,Stephen This seminar explores the unique culture of the samurai warrior class from its ancient origins to its transformation under the Tokugawa regime and its demise in modern times. To the west, the enema of Japan emerges from the samurai honor code that provides seemingly incompatible practices like Zen training and ritual suicide. How could a warrior class exist through centuries of peace by practicing, philosophically, the Way of the Sword? In addition to aspects to aspects of samurai warfare and the philosophy of death, we will also study the samurai way of love. Among the primary and secondary materials will be samurai legends and tales, the theater of war, and samurai films.    Same as COMLIT 240.

LEGAL STUDIES
U1   52914 LEGAL 397F ST-Crime On Film 01 LEC
Location: TBA Time:9:05AM 12:05PM Days: Wed  Instructor: Brooks,Dianne L.
How the law translates to film. The purposes for which law narratives are used. The aesthetic and ideological constructions of law and legal issues in feature and documentary films. Textual theoretical approaches to cinema combined with cultural studies and critical legal theory. Classic, art, independent, and contemporary popular films. Films screened during class each week. Students must sign up for the lab.
This course is open to Undergraduate Seniors, Juniors & Sophomores only.

POLITICAL SCIENCE
U1   56275 POLISCI 201 American Politics Through Film 1
Location: Herter 231 Time:1:25PM 2:15PM Days: Mon Wed  Instructor: Mileur,Jerome M  Location: Herter 231 Time:7:00PM 9:30PM Days: Wed  Instructor: TBA
Location: TBA Time:9:05AM 9:55AM Days: Fri  Instructor: TBA
Location: TBA Time:10:10AM 11:00AM Days: Fri  Instructor: TBA
Location: TBA Time:11:15AM 12:05PM Days: Fri  Instructor: TBA
Location: TBA Time:12:20PM 1:10PM Days: Fri  Instructor: TBA
Location: TBA Time:1:25PM 2:15PM Days: Fri  Instructor: TBA
Location: TBA Time:2:30PM 3:20PM Days: Fri  Instructor: TBA
Motives used to explore the development of American politics in the 20th century. The forces that shaped our politics early in the century (immigration, reform, religion), the rise of "big" government in the depression and World War II years (the new roles of the federal government, the enhanced presidency, internationalism, and anti-communism), and selected issues (race, gender, modern campaigns) prominent since the 1960s. The meaning of political democracy in America and how our understanding of it has adapted to changing times and conditions
U1   57162 POLISCI 297A ST- Amer Pol Through Film 1 LEC
Location: TBA Time:1:00AM 1:00AM Days: TBA Instructor: TBA