UMASS AMHERST 

Five College Film & Video Course Guide 
FALL 2010

(updated 9/16/2010)

Note:  Recent changes in course info are indicated in green.

All UMass courses are 3 or 4 credits unless otherwise indicated.

 

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ANTH 306  VISUAL ANTHROPOLOGY

78485 Tuesday/Thursday 11:15AM - 12:30PM  lecture/discussion, Dickinson Hall 216

78486  W 5:30-7:30, screening, Machmer Hall room W-27   Credits: 4

Professor Jacqueline Urla             Cap 30 (Gen Ed)         

This course examines the politics and poetics of visual representation in the field of anthropology, focusing primarily, but not exclusively, on the moving image.  We will consider the earliest forms of ethnographic displays in World’s Fairs, popular forms of representing non-western peoples and the various approaches anthropologists have developed for ethnographic film.  Lecture/discussion. Film screenings, film journal and essay exams. 

Recommended: ANTHRO 104 or 106 or COMM 240

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIA, V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  6

 

ART 230:  PHOTO 1

Professor Caroline Valites              Cap (Ug 14, G, 2)              Credits 3
SPIRE:  
71145 Tuesdays & Thursdays 1 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.,  Studio Arts Building, Room 18
Introduction to photographic tools and methods. The balance between self-inquiry and the importance of process and materials as vehicles of meaning. Theory explored through class critiques and slide presentations. Photography examined and discussed both from a personal point of view and in its wider cultural context.
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  none

 

ART 297Q (also ART597Q):  ANIMATION FUNDAMENTALS   
Professor Patricia Galvis-Assmus                         Cap: (Ug 12, G 2)                 Credits: 3
SPIRE: 71233  Tuesdays & Thursdays, 9:30 a.m. – 12:15 p.m., Fine Arts Center, Room 447

With studio. Introduction to methods and techniques of animation, as well as history of experimental film. Hands-on work with object, sand, line and clay animation, among others. Basic audio and video skills. Students develop projects of their own design resulting in a fully edited videotape of their work.

Prerequisites: Completed Foundations or consent of instructor

Open to ART, BFA-ART, and BFA-ART ED majors or by consent of instructor.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  V    

Five College Film Studies Major category:  8

 

ART 374 (also ART 697JA):  INT TO COMPUTER ANIMATION
Professor                     Cap (Ug, 14, G 2)                Credits: 3
SPIRE: 71265  Mondays & Wednesdays, 10:10 a.m. – 12:05 p.m., Fine Arts Center, Room 447

(All students must sign up for Lab as well; the SPIRE number for this is 76835)
First half of a two-semester sequence. With studio. Principles and applications of computer animation using Crater and Alias Maya software in film, video, music, and technology. Introduction to 2D and 3D animation programs. Skills acquired in preparation for production in second semester. Emphasis on professionalism and quality. Prerequisites: ART 271, 297Q. Should be followed by 397, 3D Computer Animation.
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate Category: V
Five College Film Studies Major Category: 8


ART 397KK (also ART 697NN):  PHOTO “IN THE EXPANDED FIELD”
Professor Susan Jahoda               Cap (Ug 12, G 4)                                 Credits: 3
SPIRE:  71247 Thursdays, 9:30 a.m. – 12:15 p.m., Studio Arts Building, 240
An artist’s choice of tools and materials is based on a fascination with their inherent characteristics and possibilities. In this course we will explore photographically derived images as device and strategy, potentially lending themselves to photo-sculpture, photo-text, photo-installation and photo-performance. These, and other practices incorporating photographically derived images, will be discussed in historic and contemporary contexts through readings, lectures, and visual presentations of other artist’s works.  Participants will be asked to produce work through assigned and self-assigned projects, with the option of also working collaboratively.

Open to ART, BFA-ART, and BFA-DESIGN majors only.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  none


ART 397R (also ART 697C):  PHOTO III 
Professor Susan Jahoda                          Cap:12              Credits: 3

SPIRE:  71250  Tuesdays & Thursdays, 1 p.m. – 3:45 p.m., Studio Arts Building, 240
Concept:  It is through memory, recognition, image repertoires, and experiences that we construct our worlds. Throughout the semester we will focus on identifying the content that is driving your work, but is currently missing from your work. The aim, to bring you to a place of recognizing what is “absent” in your work, and what you would like to carry forward in your work that is “present”. This exploration will be articulated through both collaborative exercises and three projects: Considering the “nature” of Landscape, Still life and On Love.

Process:  In this course you will begin rethinking picture making through the added element of color. You can choose to photograph with color film in a range of camera formats (analog) and scan your negatives and/or work with a digital SLR camera. You may also work in digital video and mixed-media if this is conceptually appropriate.

Enrollment Requirements:  Undergraduate and Graduate students with majors in ART, BFA-Art, BFA-Art Ed, or BFA-Design only.  Prerequisites:  Art 230 & 231 

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  none

 

CHINESE 136:  INTRODUCTION TO CHINESE CINEMA

CANCELLED

Professor Zhang                           Cap 40                       Credits 3
77842, Tuesdays & Thursdays, 11:15 – 12:30, with a lab Wed 335-530PM      Bartlett Hall room 119 

This class presents an introduction to Chinese cinema from its birth in 1905 up to the present.  It focuses on the close reading and appreciation of representative Chinese films. Arranged chronologically and thematically, this course examines interaction of film texts with social contexts.  In-depth analyses of films from Mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan leads students to consider theoretical questions such as film aesthetics production, distribution and reception.  Topics include relationships of cinema and mass culture, history, ideology, colonialism, and globalization.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, V

Five College Film Studies Major category: 5

 

COMM  231            FILM & TV PRODUCTION CONCEPTS  

72190  LEC            01 TuesThurs            2:30 pm - 3:45 pm, Herter Hall room 231        

Bruce Geisler                Cap 125     

Lecture, discussion.  This class provides an overview of film and   television production principles and processes from script to screen  and also prepares students for later hands-on production courses.  We will explore both the art and craft of film and video production,   including the roles and functions of the major creative and technical personnel in the scripting/pre-production, production and  post-production phases.  Technical aspects such as digital vs. analog media, lighting, lenses, types of film and videotape, crew organization and function, editing concepts, sound recording, etc. will be discussed, as well as creative functions such as dramatic and documentary structure, creating characters, acting for the  screen, visualization and composition for the camera and more, (Course capacity is 125)

Course Eligibility*: Open to COMM & Undeclared majors, or to students who have already taken COMM 118 or 121.   UMass Film Certificate students who do not meet any of the above criteria should come to the Film Studies office (129 Herter Annex) to add the course.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  I, V

Five College Film Studies Major category: 6

 

COMM 240 MODES OF FILM COMMUNICATION

72191  LEC            01  TuesThurs        11:15 am - 12:30 pm            Herter Hall room 231

72192  LAB            L01 Tues 7:00 pm - 9:30 pm  Herter Hall room 231        

Shawn Shimpach             Cap 125

Lecture, lab (screening).  The nature and functions of film, including narrative and non-narrative approaches to film communication.  Topics will include: the components of film expression (composition, movement, editing, sound, directing, and acting); designs in screen narrative; film's relationship to other arts and media; and the role of film as an instrument of social reflection and change.   (Course capacity is 125)Course Eligibility*: Open to Seniors, Juniors & Sophomores only.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  I

Five College Film Studies Major category:  1

 

COMM 296F INDSTU-FILM FESTIVAL

72193  IND            01 Wed 7:00 pm - 10:00 pm            School of Management rm 137

Anne Ciecko                Cap 200     

This is a 1-credit Mandatory Pass/Fail course

Film screening. This semester's festival colloquium will be held in conjunction with the Arab Cinema Panorama film series. To earn 1-credit (pass/fail), students are required to attend a colloquium orientation during the first week of classes and at least 6 additional screening events throughout the semester, and to complete a survey at the end of each of the screenings attended (Course capacity is 50) 

Course Eligibility*: All majors; no prerequisites

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  none (1-credit course)

Five College Film Studies Major category:  none (1-credit course)

 

COMM 331 PROGRAM PROCESS IN TV      

72109  LEC 01Wed10:10 am - 11:00 am, Machmer Hall room W-25

David Maxcy  Cap 36

72110  LAB  L01  Mon 1:25 pm - 4:25 pm            Herter TV Studio            Cap 12

72111  LAB  L02  Wed 1:25 pm - 4:25 pm            Herter TV Studio             Cap 12

72112  LAB  L03  Fri            9:05 am - 12:05 pm            Herter TV Studio             Cap 12

Lecture, studio. Introduction to concepts and techniques of television production, through lectures, lab exercises, and guided production projects.   All 3 sections will meet together once a week for a 50-minute lecture with the course director.    Each section (@12 students) will then meet once a week for a 3-hour lab session.  (Course capacity is 36)

Course Eligibility*:  Open to Senior, Junior & Sophomore Communication majors

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  8

           

COMM  340  HISTORY OF FILM I

72113  LEC 01  TuesThurs  2:30 pm - 3:45 pm            Machmer Hall room E-37   

72114  LAB  L01Tues 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm            Machmer Hall room E-37   

Martin Norden             Cap 50

Lecture, lab (screening).  A survey of key events and representative films that mark the his¬tory of motion pictures in the United States and other countries to 1950.  In addition to identify¬ing and providing access to major works, the course is designed to facilitate the study of the various influences (industrial, technological, aesthetic, social, cultural, and politi¬cal) that have shaped the evolution of the medium to the advent of television. (Course capacity is 50)

Course Eligibility*:  Open to Senior & Junior Communication majors, other students by permission of instructor.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIA, V

Five College Film Studies Major category: 2

 

COMM 397AF ST-HISTORY OF AMERICAN FILM  

76671  LEC  01 TuesThurs  9:30 am - 10:45 am, Dickinson room 209

78155  LAB  L01 Tues 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm, South College room 108

Kevin Anderson                     Cap 25            

Lecture, discussion.  In this course we will study motion picture production in the United States since the early 1880s on up to contemporary forms of digital cinema.  Our approach will be both aesthetic as well as social, considering artistic and technical developments that advanced the medium, as well as cultural and financial trends that influenced films' production and reception.  We will thus consult a variety of research methods, questioning their authors' interests and conclusions, as we evaluate broader notions of recording history, appreciating art, and understanding society through motion pictures.  (Course capacity is 25)

Course Eligibility*:  Senior and Junior Communication majors and others by permission of instructor

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  5

           

COMM 397AI   ST-INTERNATIONAL FILM STARDOM    

77744  LEC  01  TuesThurs 9:30 am - 10:45 am            Machmer Hall room E-37   

Anne Ciecko                Cap 43            

Lecture, discussion. This film studies course focuses on stardom and celebrity as a dynamic global phenomenon. We will employ a variety of theoretical approaches and analytical methods to examine case studies from all over the world, from earliest cinema to most contemporary. Topics to be addressed include the following: the value and meaning of constructed star images; performances and reality discourses; fandom and gossip; star systems and industrial issues; celebrity biopolitics and national identities; cross-over and transmedia stardom; and questions of cultural specificity. A diverse variety of filmic and audiovisual media texts will be viewed/experienced inside and outside class. In addition to short writing assignments, students will develop individual final projects tailored to research interests. (Course capacity is 43)

Course Eligibility*: All majors; no prerequisites (although any introductory film and/or global/international studies courses are recommended)

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIA, V

Five College Film Studies Major category: 5, 6

 

 

COMM 397B            ST-INTRO STUDIO DIRECTING  

72181  LEC 01  Tues     11:15 am - 3:15 pm            Herter TV Studio        

David Maxcy               Cap 10            

Lecture, studio.  Students will learn basic concepts and techniques of studio television production, with a focus on directing live programs in a full-scale studio facility on the UMASS campus.  The course includes lecture presentations, production exercises, script-writing projects, and studio production projects.   Each student will write, produce, and direct two live studio productions. (Course capacity is 10)

Course Eligibility*:  Open to Senior, Junior & Sophomore Communication majors only.

Course Notes:  If have taken COMM 433 you CANNOT take this course. 

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  8

 

COMM 441 PRIN&TECHN FILM STYLE PRODUCTN  

72121  LEC 01 Wed     1:25 pm - 5:25 pm            South College room 120     

Bruce Geisler                Cap 12                        

Lecture, studio.  A hands-on introduction to single-camera filmmaking using digital video camcorders (electronic field production) and non-linear (computer-based) editing. Students will learn concepts of pre-production, shot composition, lighting, visual storytelling, continuity editing, and production & post production audio as they plan, shoot and edit exercises and complete projects.  A “real world” editing project (scenes from an episode of “Highlander”) will also be included.  (Course capacity is 12)

Course Eligibility*:  Open to Senior & Junior Communication majors only.

Course Prerequisites:  COMM 231 or COMM 331 or permission of instructor.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IV, V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  8

 

COMM 493E SEM-SCREENWRITING  

72122  SEM            01 TuesThurs        9:30 am - 10:45 am            South College room 108     

Martin Norden             Cap 20            

Lecture, discussion.  An examination of the art, craft, and business of screenwriting from theoretical and practical perspectives.  Topics include screenplay format and structure, story, plot and character development, dialog and scene description, visual storytelling, pace and rhythm, analysis of professional and student scripts and films, and more.  Written work includes three screenwriting projects.  The focus is on writing for narrative films and, to a limited extent, TV programs.   (Course capacity is 20)

Course Eligibility*:  Open to Senior & Junior Communication majors only.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IV, V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  8

 

COMM 493E SEM-SCREENWRITING

72198  SEM 02 TuesThurs 11:15 am - 12:30 pm            South College room 108     

Bruce Geisler                Cap 20

Lecture, discussion.  An examination of the art, craft, and business of screenwriting from theoretical and practical perspectives.  Topics include screenplay format and structure, story, plot and character development, dialog and scene description, visual storytelling, pace and rhythm, analysis of professional and student  scripts and films, and more.  Written work includes three screenwriting projects.  The focus is on writing for narrative films and, to a limited extent, TV programs.  (Course capacity is 20)

Course Eligibility*:  Open to Senior & Junior Communication majors only.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:   IV, V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  8

 

COMM 497AD ST-CINEMATIC BODIES/CROSSCULTRAL PERSPECTIVES       

CANCELLED

76782  LEC 01 TuesThurs 1:00 pm - 2:15 pm, location TBA                           

78159  LAB L01 Thurs 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm, location TBA   

Instructor TBA                        Cap             25

Lecture, discussion.  This course addresses how culture affects body imagery in cinema.  By examining feature, avant-garde, and documentary forms of cinema – from countries around the world - we will examine the relationship between specific socio-cultural definitions for a variety of bodies (the masculine, the feminine, the erotic, the divine, the diseased, the social, the reproductive, the cyborg, etc.) and how these vary in different national cinemas.  The course adopts an interdisciplinary approach, drawing from writings in cinema studies, communication, anthropology, art history, media studies, and science. (Course capacity is 25)

Course Eligibility*:  Senior and Junior Comm majors or by permission of instructor

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, IV, V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  6,7

 

COMM 497J ST-ADVANCED VIDEO ART PRODUCTION        

Fall 2010 Topic:  “Directing and Performance for Media”

79075   Wed 1:00-3:50 lecture: Lederle A127

79076   Tu 6:30-8:30pm lab: Lederle A127

Baba Hillman               Cap 12

Fall 2010:  Directing and Performance for Media. This is an advanced production/theory course for video

students interested in developing and strengthening the elements of directing and performance in their work. This course will explore directing and performance in their most diverse possibilities, in a context specific to film and videomakers. Students will gain skills in production and criticism through video production assignments and analysis of theoretical discourses that ground issues of production. The course will include the study of cinematography, sound recording, processing and mixing, the study and practice of editing theory, aesthetics and techniques including an exploration of structure and formats in experimental, narrative and hybrid forms. How does performance for the camera differ from performance for the stage? How do we find a physical language and a camera language that expand upon one another in a way that liberates the imagination? We will discuss visual and verbal gesture, dialogue and voice-over, variations of approach with actors and non-actors, narration and voice-over, camera movement and rhythm within the shot, and the structuring of performance in short and long form works. Screenings and readings will introduce students to a wide range of approaches to directing and performance Students will complete three video projects. Instructor permission required. Contact Professor Baba Hillman for an application form at bhillman@hampshire.edu.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IV, V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  8

 

COMM 497OO ST-ARAB CINEMA        

77684  LEC 01 TuesThurs 1:00 pm - 2:15 pm       South College room 108

77685  LAB L01 Wed          7:00 pm - 10:00 pm            School of Management rm 137

Anne Ciecko             Cap 25            

Lecture, lab, discussion.  This film studies course focuses on diverse cinematic productions from Arab states and communities—including Algeria, Bahrain, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Libya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Tunisia, the United Arab Emirates, Yemen, and diasporic Arab filmmaking in North America and Europe. Readings and lecture material will address historical background and development of Arab cinemas with emphasis on contemporary trends; aesthetics and formal strategies of narrative filmmaking (including the important relationships between cinema and other cultural forms such as music, literature, visual arts, and oral storytelling); and modes of production, exhibition, distribution, and audience/reception. Topics to be discussed also include cultural politics and state policies; multiethnicity, religion, and language/dialect; national and pan-Arab/transnational identities; gender issues; Orientalism and media stereotypes; colonialism, postcolonialism and neocolonialism; film financing, international co-productions, regional film markets, cross-over audiences, and international film festivals as showcases for Arab cinema. The emphasis in this course will be on Arab feature films (a sampling of vintage classics, and numerous commercially-produced and independent contemporary features), but we will also examine documentary works, and narrative and experimental short films/videos. Attendance at the weekly Arab Cinema Panorama film series is required for the lab/screening portion of this class, and students may simultaneously enroll in Comm 296F, the pass/fail film festival colloquium to earn an additional credit. (Course capacity is 25)

Course Eligibility*: Open to Seniors & Juniors, all majors.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:   IIB, IV, V

Five College Film Studies Major category: 5,7

 

 

COMPLIT 350: FRENCH FILM  (also FRENCH 350)

Professors Catherine Portuges & Kathryn Lachman Cap 40 (in CL350), 120 total

78053 Lec 1  Mo 3:30PM - 6:00PM             Herter Hall room 227             Credits:  4

72319 Dis 1  Tu 9:30AM - 10:45AM             School of Management 27

72320 Dis 2  Tu 11:15AM - 12:30PM             School of Management 122

72321 Dis 3  Tu 1:00PM - 2:15PM             School of Management 31       

72322 Dis  4  Tu 2:30PM – 3:45PM             School of Management 125

General Education course taught entirely in English, and all films have English subtitles. This semester’s focus is on contemporary French and Francophone films. Using the background you acquire from the assigned readings, papers, lectures, screenings, and meetings of your discussion section, you will learn how to do a critical film analysis.  We will explore recent debates about French identity in light of the challenges posed by immigration (especially non-European immigration), feminism, economic and cultural  globalization, and France's version of “multiculturalism,” casting a wide net over cinema to examine the privileged relationship between a nation, an art, and a social practice.
(Gen. Ed. AT)

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, V

Five College Film Studies Major Category:  5
 

COMP-LIT 381 SELF-REFLEXIVE AVANT-GARDE FILM

(AT) Professor Levine      Cap 120   4 credits

72300 Lec. 1 – M 3:35-7:00pm, Herter Hall 231

72301 Dis. 1 – Tu 2:30-3:45, Herter Hall room 119

72302  Dis. 2 – Th 2:30-3:45, Herter Hall room 119

72303  Dis. 3 – Tu 4:00-5:15, Herter Hall room 119

72304  Dis. 4 – Tu 6:00-7:15, Herter Hall room 119

Lecture, discussion.  Explores modern origin of film experimentation in avant-garde modes such as Expressionism, Surrealism and contemporary results of this heritage.  Trying to determine if film is the most resolutely modern of the media, we'll look at cinema as the result of two obsessive concerns:  1) the poetic, dreamlike and fantastic, 2) the factual, realistic and socially critical or anarchistic.  Thus, we'll attempt to discover how modern culture deals with avant-garde imperatives to always “make it new.”  Films and filmmakers such as Breathless (Godard), My Own Private Idaho (Lang), The American Soldier (Fassbinder), others.  Requirements:  one 5-page paper for midterm, ten-page final paper or project; attendance.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIA, V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  6

 

COMP-LIT 381H  SELF-REFLEXIVE AVANT-GARDE FILM
(AT) Professor Levine      Cap 4         5   Credits
SPIRE 78058 Mon 3:35 p.m. - 7:00 p.m., Herter Hall 231 and Tuesday 2:30-5pm Goodell 406A

Honors version of COMLIT 381 Self-Reflexive Avant Garde Film.  Includes production component.  Please see COMPLIT 381 for rest of course description.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIA, V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  6

 

COMP-LIT 499D SELF-REFLEXIVE AVANT-GARDE FILM

 (COURSE IS RESTRICTED TO CAPSTONE STUDENTS)
SPIRE: 78074  Tues 2:30 – 5 p.m.  Tuesdays, 2:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.      Goodell, 406A

(AT) Professor Levine Cap: 12  6 Credits

Capstone version of COMLIT 381 Self-Reflexive Avant Garde Film.  Includes production component.  Please see COMPLIT 381 for rest of course description.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIA, IV, V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  6

 

JOURNALISM 397L – 01 ST-DOCUMENTARY TRADITION IN LITERATURE AND FILM

SPIRE# 73654  Tuesdays, 2:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m., Bartlett Hall Room 125

Professor Madeleine Blais   Cap 35 Credits 3

This course offers an in depth exploration of the artistic and journalistic impulse to capture in words and images what the Irish call the music of what happens. Sample pairings include Harvest of Shame shown in conjunction with the John Steinbeck novel, Grapes of Wrath, Capturing the Friedmans with the Susan Orlean essay, “Seriously Silly”, Dead Man Walking with Norman Mailer’s great work of literary nonfiction The Executioner’s Song.  We will examine the strengths and weaknesses of varying approaches to what amounts to the same material, with a special emphasis on how the author/director honors truth and fact simultaneously. 

Enrollment Requirements: Open to Senior, Junior and Sophomore Journalism majors only.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  6 (component)

 

JUDAIC 344   FILM AND SOCIETY IN ISRAEL

78236  Tu 4:00 – 7:00 p.m.   Herter Hall 107

Professor Olga Gershenson           Cap 25   Credits 3     

This course uses film to discuss Israeli society.  Topics include: foundation of Israel, Israeli-Palestinian conflict, Holocaust survivors, religion, gender, and interethnic relations.  All film showings are with English subtitles.

Undergraduate Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, V
Five College Film Studies Major Category:  6 (component)
 

SPANISH 397PP   SPANISH CINEMA

78496  Tuesdays & Thursdays, 4:00 – 6:30 p.m., Herter Hall 117

Professor Jose Ornelas             Cap 30     Credits 3
Analysis of several films by some of the most important Spanish directors from the sixties to the early XXI Century, in the context of Spanish history, society, culture and politics.  Special attention will be given to films by Buñuel, Saura and Almodóvar, the three most acclaimed Spanish film directors of the XX Century.  The following topics will be analyzed: representation of gender, history, and national identity; the Spanish Civil War; filmic narrative; role of religion; sexual and sociopolitical repression; violence and transgression: (de)construction of codified myths and institutions related to the church, bullfighting, machismo, etc.; the representation of the urban space; social, political and cultural subversion, etc.  All of the films chosen for the course take a critical look at Spain, beginning with the period prior to the Civil War and continuing with the Civil War, the post-Franco period (the so-called period of transition) and ending with the past twenty years as Spain becomes more interconnected with Europe, a period associated with a new moral, social, political and cultural order.

Course will be taught in English

Undergraduate Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, V
Five College Film Studies Major Category:  5