UMASS AMHERST 

Five College Film & Video Course Guide 

FALL 2009 (updated 9/10/09)

 

Note:  Course info may be subject to change and will be updated as more information becomes available.  All courses are 3 credits unless otherwise indicated.

 

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ANTH 306  VISUAL ANTHROPOLOGY

31193 Tuesday/Thursday 11:15AM - 12:30PM  lecture/discussion, Machmer Hall room W-27

31218  W 5:30-8:00 screening, Machmer Hall room W-27

Jacqueline Urla             Cap 36

This course examines the politics and poetics of visual representation in the field of anthropology, focusing primarily, but not exclusively, on the moving image.  We will consider the earliest forms of ethnographic displays in World’s Fairs, popular forms of representing non-western peoples and the various approaches anthropologists have developed for ethnographic film.

Lecture/discussion. Film screenings, film journal and essay exams.

Recommended: ANTHRO 104 or 106 or COMM 240

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIA

Five College Film Studies Major category:  4, 6

 

ART 230  PHOTOGRAPHY I

31271  Tuesday/Thursday 1:00PM - 3:45PM, Studio Arts Building Room 18

Ryan Feeney                 Cap 14

Photography I is an introduction to the language of light sensitive materials. It involves, through learning, the balance between self inquiry and the importance of process and materials as vehicles of meaning.  Assignments throughout the course will employ a structured approach to photographic tools and methods.  There will also be sufficient scope for participants to interpret and discover meanings and imagery for themselves within and beyond the framework of technique.  Class critiques and PowerPoint presentations form the theoretical part of the course in which photography is examined and discussed from both a personal point of view and in its wider cultural context.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor if not an Art Major

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  V       

Five College Film Studies Major category:  none

 

ART  297Q - ST-ANIMATION FUNDAMENTALS

Patricia Galvis-Assmus

31363  TuTh 1:00-3:45pm Fine Arts Center room 447      Cap 8

With studio. Introduction to methods and techniques of animation, as well as history of experimental film. Hands-on work with object, sand, line and clay animation, among others. Basic audio and video skills. Students develop projects of their own design resulting in a fully edited videotape of their work.

Prerequisites: Completed Foundations or consent of instructor

Open to ART, BFA-ART, and BFA-ART ED majors or by consent of instructor.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  V       

Five College Film Studies Major category:  8

 

ART 374 – 01 INT COMPTER ANIMATION I

31399 Monday/Wednesday 10:10AM – 12:05 PM, Fine Arts Center room 447

Jed Mitchell                  Cap 12

40105      01 Lab    Fine Arts Center Rm 439

First half of a two-semester sequence. With studio. Principles and applications of computer animation using Crater and Alias Maya software in film, video, music, and technology. Introduction to 2D and 3D animation programs. Skills acquired in preparation for production in second semester. Emphasis on professionalism and quality. Prerequisites: ART 297Q. Should be followed by 397, 3D Computer Animation.

Open to ART, BFA-ART, and BFA-ART ED majors or by consent of instructor.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  V       

Five College Film Studies Major category:  8

 

ART 397KK ST-PHOTOGRAPHY “IN THE EXPANDED FIELD”

31378 Thurday 9:30AM -12:15PM, Studio Arts Building Room 240

Instructor: Susan Jahoda            Cap 12

An artist’s choice of tools and materials is based on a fascination with their inherent characteristics and possibilities. In this course we will explore photographically derived images as device and strategy, potentially lending themselves to photo-sculpture, photo-text, photo-installation and photo-performance. These, and other practices incorporating photographically derived images, will be discussed in historic and contemporary contexts through readings, lectures, and visual presentations of other artist’s works.  Participants will be asked to produce work through assigned and self-assigned projects, with the option of also working collaboratively.

Open to ART, BFA-ART, and BFA-DESIGN majors only.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  none

 

ART 397N- 01 ST- DIGITAL MEDIA: STILL IMAGE

31368 Tuesday/Thursday 1:00PM – 3:45PM Studio Arts Bldg Room 16

Instructor: Rosanne Retz            Cap 16

40688  MoWe  7:00-10:00PM  Instructor:  Mikael Petraccio   Studio Arts Bldg Room 16  Cap 16

This course examines the realm of digital image creation and manipulation using primarily Adobe Photoshop® CS4 and Dreamweaver. Topics will include negative and flatbed scanning, advanced color and tonal correction, and pigment printing. We will be taking the principles of traditional color and black and white darkroom techniques and learn to apply them to our digital files. We will also learn to maximize images made with digital cameras and gain control over color management. We will use Mac computers, as well as digital cameras, flat bed scanners, and large format inkjet printers using archival inks and papers.

            You will be encouraged to combine the aesthetics of drawing, painting, and photographic practices through the medium of digital prints in order to produce carefully constructed imagery. You will be expected to pursue your ongoing personal work to fulfill assignments and will be expected to present a cohesive portfolio of digital prints for the final portfolio. The last project will be a well researched and carefully designed artist website that will be a coherently organized series of linked pages.

Open to ART, BFA-ART, BFA-ART ED & BFA-DESIGN majors only (any level).

Pre Req: Art 110, 120, 131, and 142

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  none

 

ART 397R- ST PHOTO III

31381 Tuesday/Thurday 1:00PM- 3:45PM, Studio Arts Building Room 240

Instructor: Susan Jahoda            Cap 12

Concept:

It is through memory, recognition, image repertoires, and experiences that we construct our worlds. Throughout the semester we will focus on identifying the content that is driving your work, but is currently missing from your work. The aim, to bring you to a place of recognizing what is "absent" in your work, and what you would like to carry forward in your work that is "present". This exploration will be articulated through both collaborative exercises and three projects: Considering the “nature” of Landscape, Still life and On Love.

Process:

In this course you will begin rethinking picture making through the added element of color. You can choose to photograph with color film in a range of camera formats (analog) and scan your negatives and/or work with a digital SLR camera. You may also work in digital video and mixed-media if this is conceptually appropriate.

Prerequisites: Undergraduate and Graduate students with majors in ART, BFA-Art, BFA-Art Ed, or BFA-Design only. 

Prerequisites: Art 230: Photography I, Art 231: Photography II

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  none

 

ART 597Q- 01 ST-ANIMATION FNDMTLS

31364 Tuesday/ Thursday 1:00PM – 3:45PM, Fine Arts Center room 447

Patricia Galvis-Assmus  Cap 2

With studio. Introduction to methods and techniques of animation, as well as history of experimental film. Hands-on work with object, sand, line and clay animation, among others. Basic audio and video skills. Students develop projects of their own design resulting in a fully edited videotape of their work. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

Open to Masters Art majors or with consent of instructor.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  8

 

COMM 231   FILM & TELEVISION PRODUCTION CONCEPTS

32466  TuTh 2:30PM - 3:45PM Herter Hall room 231    

Bruce Geisler                Cap 125

Lecture, discussion.  This class provides an overview of film and television production principles and processes from script to screen and also prepares students for later hands-on production courses. We will explore both the art and craft of film and video production, including the roles and functions of the major creative and technical personnel in the scripting/ pre-production, production and post-production phases. Technical aspects such as digital vs. analog media, lighting, lenses, types of film and videotape, crew organization and function, editing concepts, sound recording, etc. will be discussed, as well as creative functions such as dramatic and documentary structure, creating characters, acting for the screen, visualization and composition for the camera and more.   (Course capacity is 150)

Course Eligibility*: Open to COMM & Undeclared majors, or to students who have already taken COMM 118 or 121.

Course Notes:   Formerly numbered COMM 297D.  If you have already taken COMM 297D you cannot take this course. 

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  I, V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  6

 

COMM 240:  MODES OF FILM COMMUNICATION

32467  TuTh 11:15AM - 12:30PM Lecture          Herter Hall room 231 

32468  Tu 7:00PM - 9:30PM Lab(screening)       Herter Hall room 231

Instructor: Shawn Shimpach       Cap 125

Lecture, lab (screening).  The nature and functions of film, including narrative and non-narrative approaches to film communication.  Topics will include: the components of film expression (composition, movement, editing, sound, directing, and acting); designs in screen narrative; film's relationship to other arts and media; and the role of film as an instrument of social reflection and change.   (Course capacity is 125)

Course Eligibility*: Open to Seniors, Juniors & Sophomores only.  

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  I

Five College Film Studies Major category:  1

 

COMM 296F:  INDSTU-FILM FESTIVAL

32472  Wednesday 7:00PM - 10:00PM   School of Management room 137

Instructor: Anne Ciecko             Cap 50

This is a 1-credit Mandatory Pass/Fail course

Film screening.  This semester’s festival colloquium will be held in conjunction with the New Asia Cinema film festival.  To earn 1 credit (pass/fail), students are required to attend at least 7 festival events and complete surveys at the end of the screening.  (Course capacity is 50)

Course Eligibility*:   All majors; no prerequisites       

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  none

Five College Film Studies Major category:  none

 

COMM 331:  PROGRAM PROCESS IN TELEVISION  

32382 Wednesday 10:10AM – 11:00AM Lecture, Machmer Hall W-25

Instructor: David Maxcy                                    Cap 12 x 3 sections = 36

32383  Mon 1:25PM - 4:25PM   Herter TV Studio 21

32384  Wed 1:25PM - 4:25PM   Herter TV Studio 21

32385  Fri 9:05AM - 12:05PM    Herter TV Studio 21

Lecture, studio. Introduction to concepts and techniques of television production, through lectures, lab exercises, and guided production projects.   All 3 sections will meet together once a week for a 50-minute lecture with the course director.    Each section (@12 students) will then meet once a week for a 3-hour lab session. 

Course Eligibility*:  Open to Senior, Junior & Sophomore Communication majors

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  8

 

COMM 340:  HISTORY OF FILM I

32386  TuTh 2:30PM - 3:45PM Lecture, Machmer Hall room E-37

32387  Tu 4:00PM - 6:00PM Lab (screening), Machmer Hall room E-37

Instructor: Martin Norden                      Cap 50

Lecture, lab (screening).  A survey of key events and representative films that mark the history of motion pictures in the United States and other countries to 1950.  In addition to identifying and providing access to major works, the course is designed to facilitate the study of the various influences (industrial, technological, aesthetic, social, cultural, and political) that have shaped the evolution of the medium to the advent of television. Course Eligibility*:  Open to Senior & Junior Communication majors, other students by permission of instructor

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIA

Five College Film Studies Major category:  2

 

COMM 393C:  S – ISSUES IN WORLD CINEMA:  WORLD MUSIC & FILM

39131  TuTh 4:00PM – 5:15PM, Machmer Hall W-25

Instructor: Anne Ciecko             Cap 40

Lecture, discussion, screening. This course will focus of the use of music in relation to the moving image, with an emphasis on international and intercultural film and video. Topics to be considered include film music (scores and soundtracks); onscreen performances by musical artists; documentaries about musicians and music culture; musical film genres (musicals, music videos, etc.); interconnections between music and filmic elements such as narrative and editing; world/popular music and film industries; inter-artistic collaborations; live musical accompaniment for film screenings and multimedia events. This interdisciplinary film studies course will be grounded in theory and development of critical and analytical skills, and there will also be opportunities for hands-on practical and creative projects. There is no additional lab screening section; students will be required to attend a number of out-of-class screening/performance events throughout the semester from a list of choices. (Course capacity is 40)

Course Eligibility*:   All majors; no prerequisites.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category: IIA or IIB

Five College Film Studies Major category:  5, 6

 

COMM 397B:  SPECIAL TOPIC-INTRODUCTION TO STUDIO DIRECTING

32456  Tuesday 11:15AM - 3:15PM, Herter TV Studio 21

David Maxcy                Cap 10

Lecture, studio.  Students will learn basic concepts and techniques of studio television production, with a focus on directing live programs in a full-scale studio facility on the UMASS campus.  The course includes lecture presentations, production exercises, script-writing projects, and studio production projects.   Each student will write, produce, and direct two live studio productions. (Course capacity is 10)

Course Eligibility*:  Open to Senior, Junior & Sophomore Communication majors only.

Course Notes:  If have taken COMM 433 you CANNOT take this course

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category: V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  8

 

 

COMM 397CC  INTRODUCTION TO VIDEO ART PRODUCTION: ADAPTATION

Bernadine Mellis

40214  Tues 5-7pm, Bartlett 302 (screening) and 40215 Wed 12:45-3:45pm,  A127 Lederle (lab)

Fall 2009:  “Adaptation”.  This course provides a foundation in the principles, techniques, and equipment involved in making short video adaptations. Working with already existing texts (short stories, plays, poems, novel excerpts, films, songs, news stories, etc.), students will develop their own projects. The course will introduce students to the following: developing a viable story idea and script from another author’s text; working with actors; dramatic structure and its relationship to cinematography; aesthetics and mechanics of shooting; the role of sound; and the conceptual and technical underpinnings of digital editing.  We will do several very short exercises early in the semester, working towards a longer final piece.  The larger objective of the course is to gain proficiency in the language of moving images by looking at other media through the prism of film.  In this way, we will develop our ability to tell stories in cinematic terms.  Registration by permission of instructor.  See the Comm 397CC course listing at www.umass.edu/film for an application.

 

COMM 397AF:  ST – HISTORY OF AMERICAN FILM

39698  TuTh 9:30AM – 10:45AM

Instructor: Kevin Anderson        Cap 25

Lecture, discussion. In this course we will study motion picture production in the United States since the early

1880s on up to contemporary forms of digital cinema. Our approach will be both aesthetic as well as social,

considering artistic and technical developments that advanced the medium, as well as cultural and financial

trends that influenced films' production and reception. We will thus consult a variety of research methods,

questioning their authors' interests and conclusions, as we evaluate broader notions of recording history,

appreciating art, and understanding society through motion pictures. (Course capacity is 25)

Course Eligibility*:  Senior and Junior Communication majors and others by permission of instructor

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category: IIB

Five College Film Studies Major category:  5

 

COMM 397UU:  SPECIAL TOPIC-WOMEN IN DOCUMENTARIES    <<<CANCELLED>>>

39616  Thursday 4:00PM – 7:00PM, location TBA

Instructor:  Lisa Ades                Cap TBA

Lecture, discussion.  This course examines women in documentary film--as subjects and as storytellers. How does gender influence filmmaking? How and why are particular stories told? Why are women drawn to non-fiction filmmaking?  How does documentary film provide a voice for marginalized topics? With these questions in mind, we explore the history of women in non-fiction film, methods and approaches to documentary filmmaking, and how social, political and cultural movements have shaped and been shaped by women’s storytelling.  Among the issues and themes addressed by the films screened in this course are: health and environment, beauty and body image, sexuality, popular culture, coming of age, mothers and daughters, war and human rights. Film selections range from Leni Riefenstahl’s Olympiad to Kate Davis’s Southern Comfort to Barbara Kopple’s Dixie Chicks: Shut Up and Sing.  (Course capacity is 25)

Course Eligibility*: Open to Senior and Junior Communication majors and others by permission of instructor.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category: IIB

Five College Film Studies Major category:  4, 6

 

COMM 441:  PRINCIPLES & TECHNIQUES OF FILM-STYLE PRODUCTION

32394  Wednesday 2:30PM - 6:25PM     South College room 108

Instructor: Bruce Geisler            Cap 12

Lecture, studio.  A hands-on introduction to single-camera filmmaking using digital video camcorders (electronic field production) or 16mm cameras and non-linear (computer-based) editing. Students will learn concepts of pre-production, shot composition, lighting, visual storytelling, continuity editing, and production & post production audio as they plan, shoot and edit exercises and complete projects.  A "real world" editing project (scenes from an episode of "Highlander”) will also be included.  (Course capacity is 12)

Course Prerequisites:  COMM 231 or COMM 331 or permission of instructor.

Course Eligibility*:  Open to Senior & Junior Communication majors

Course Notes:  Junior and Senior COMM majors who have completed either COMM 231 or COMM 331 may add this course through Spire.   Others may add only by permission of the instructor. 

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IV, V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  8

 

COMM 493E/1:   SEMINAR-SCREENWRITING  

32395 TuTh 9:30AM - 10:45AM, South College room 108

Instructor: Martin Norden          Cap20

Lecture, discussion.  An examination of the art, craft, and business of screenwriting from theoretical and practical perspectives.  Topics include screenplay format and structure, story, plot and character development, dialog and scene description, visual storytelling, pace and rhythm, analysis of professional and student scripts and films, and more.  Written work includes three screenwriting projects.  The focus is on writing for narrative films and, to a limited extent, TV programs. 

Prerequisite: COMM film course

Course Eligibility*:  Open to Senior & Junior Communication majors only.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IV, V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  8

 

COMM 493E/2:  SEMINAR-SCREENWRITiNG

32481  TuTh 11:15AM - 12:30PM, South College room 108

Instructor: Bruce Geisler            Cap20

Lecture, discussion.  An examination of the art, craft, and business of screenwriting from theoretical and practical perspectives.  Topics include screenplay format and structure, story, plot and character development, dialog and scene description, visual storytelling, pace and rhythm, analysis of professional and student scripts and films, and more.  Written work includes three screenwriting projects.  The focus is on writing for narrative films and, to a limited extent, TV programs.  

Prerequisite: COMM film course

Course Eligibility*:  Open to Senior & Junior Communication majors only.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IV, V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  8

 

COMM 493F:  SEMINAR-FILM DOCUMENTARY

Geisler  411 Machmer

40033  We 10:10AM - 1:00PM   South College room 108                         Cap 20

Lecture, discussion.  This course combines critical analysis with a hands-on introduction to producing a documentary.  Students will view, analyze, and critique all or part of fifteen works by filmmakers from Robert Flaherty ("Nanook of the North") to Morgan Spurlock ("Supersize Me"), to further their understanding of the documentarian's craft and art.  Students will also do pre-production (research and scripting) on their own short documentary, along with shorter hands-on exercises in writing narration, interview techniques, use of archival sources, etc.  (Course capacity is 20)

Course Prerequi¬site:  COMM 240 or COMM 297D or COMM 340 or COMM 342 or COMM 493E or consent of instructor.

Course Eligibility*:  Open to Senior & Junior Communication majors or by consent of instructor

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IV, IIB

Five College Film Studies Major category:  4

 

COMM 497AB  STHOLLYWOOD FILM , DIVERSITY AND ADAPTATION

38808  TuThu 11:15 AM- 12:30 PM       Machmer W-26

Instructor: Demetria Shabazz     Cap25

Lecture, discussion.  This course aims to inspire the development of a critical vocabulary for analysis of the formal conventions of film, especially as they bear on literary discourse. In addition, this course will focus on cinematic and literary works that articulate or express specific notions of American identity in terms of race, class, and gender. This class will look specifically at how the film industry negotiates specific literary narratives about identity within American society as a means of adapting the texts to the big screen. (Course capacity is 25)

Course Eligibility*:  Senior and Junior Communication majors or by permission of instructor

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IV, IIB

Five College Film Studies Major category:  5, 6

 

COMM 497AD  ST – CINEMATIC BODIES IN CROSS CUTURAL PERSPECTIVE

40005  TuThu 1:00PM – 2:15PM     Machmer E-37

Instructor: Kevin Anderson                    Cap25

Lecture, discussion. This course addresses how culture affects body imagery in cinema. By examining feature, avantgarde, and documentary forms of cinema – from countries around the world we will examine the relationship between specific sociocultural definitions for a variety of bodies (the masculine, the feminine, the erotic, the divine, the diseased, the social, the reproductive, the cyborg, etc.) and how these vary in different national cinemas. The course adopts an interdisciplinary approach, drawing from writings in cinema studies, communication, anthropology, art history, media studies, and science. (Course capacity is 25)

Course Eligibility*:  Senior and Junior Communication majors or by permission of instructor

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, IV

Five College Film Studies Major category: 6

 

COMM 497N:  SPECIAL TOPIC-ASIAN POP CINEMA

38811  TuTh 1:00PM - 2:15PM, South College room 108

Anne Ciecko                 Cap 25

Lecture, discussion, screening.  This film studies course focuses on Asian cinema, with a special emphasis on questions of genre and gender in films from East, Southeast, and South Asia. Focusing primarily on specific contextual issues of production, exhibition, distribution, and reception, our study of Asian films will be comparative, cross-cultural, and interdisciplinary. Potential film genres to be considered include the following: musicals (including Bollywoodmasala” movies), comedy, melodrama, romance, historical epic/biopic; martial arts/ swordplay/samurai films, horror and thriller, animation, sci-fi and fantasy, urban gangster/action films, and “exploitation” genres, as well as “art films.” In addition to active participation in class discussion, students will be expected to write several short papers and to produce and present a customized final research project. (Course capacity is 25).

Course Notes:  There are no specific prerequisites but some background in film studies and/or cultural theory is recommended.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, IV

Five College Film Studies Major category: 5, 6

 

COMP-LIT 350 FRENCH FILM      (also French Studies 350)

Catherine Portuges, Donald Maddox

38873  Lec 1  Mo 3:30PM - 6:00PM       Herter Hall room 227                 Cap 40 (in CL350), 120 combined

32648  Dis 1  Tu 9:30AM - 10:45AM      Herter Hall room 225

32649  Dis 2  Tu 11:15AM - 12:30PM    Herter Hall room 225

32650  Dis 3  Tu 1:00PM - 2:15PM        Herter Hall room 225    

32651  Dis  4  Tu 2:30PM – 3:45PM       Herter Hall room 225

Course taught in English (with screenings).  The development of French film from the 1930s and its relations to French society.  Analysis and reading of specific films, the ideology of different film practices, and relevant aspects of film theory, including questions of representations.  Films by directors such as Vigo, CarnE, Renoir, Bresson, Resnais, Godard, Truffaut, Ackerman, Kurys, Tavernier.  (Gen. Ed. AT)

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB     

Five College Film Studies Major category:  5

           

COMP-LIT 381 SELF-REFLEXIVE AVANT-GARDE FILM

(AT) Levine                  Cap 120

32620  Lec. 1 – M 3:35-7:00pm, Herter Hall 231

32621  Dis. 1 – Tu 2:30-3:45, Herter Hall 207

32622  Dis. 2 – Th 2:30-3:45,  Herter Hall 207

32623  Dis. 3 – Tu 4:00-5:15, Herter Hall 207

32624  Dis. 4 – Tu 6:00-7:15,  Herter Hall 207

Lecture, discussion.  Explores modern origin of film experimentation in avant-garde modes such as Expressionism, Surrealism and contemporary results of this heritage.  Trying to determine if film is the most resolutely modern of the media, we'll look at cinema as the result of two obsessive concerns:  1) the poetic, dreamlike and fantastic, 2) the factual, realistic and socially critical or anarchistic.  Thus, we'll attempt to discover how modern culture deals with avant-garde imperatives to always "make it new.”  Films and filmmakers such as Breathless (Godard), My Own Private Idaho (Lang), The American Soldier (Fassbinder), others.  Requirements:  one 5-page paper for midterm, ten-page final paper or project; attendance.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIA

Five College Film Studies Major category:  6

 

COMP-LIT 381H SELF-REFLEXIVE AVANT-GARDE FILM (Honors section)

38875 Monday 3:35-7:00 Lecture , Herter Hall room 231

38876 Tuesday 2:30-5:30 Discussion, Goodell Building room 406A

Instructor: Don Levine               Cap 4

Levine Commonwealth College Honors section: Students must also enroll in Comp-Lit 381

We will apply ourselves to the problem of vision itself as an acquired skill, learning to distinguish the various ways in which Hollywood normative cinema has constructed a code both visual and narrative which we accept, uncritically, as the standard by which reality gets transposed to the screen.  This code is examined – how it differs from what we actually see with the “naked” eye and how it, in turn, influences what we see (what we can see, what we look for) in the world.  Various forms of avant-garde film are examined so that we come to imagine how it might be otherwise (films by directors such as Dreyer, Lang, Man Ray, Bunuel, Vertov, Godard, Fassbinder, Egoyan, and Van Sent).  Students will attend a large lecture and film screening: (once a week) and the next day, an intensive seminar-style section of 2-3 hours.  Here we present and discuss new material, some from readings, and, occasionally, screenings of additional films and film clips.  The course is incremental and there is thus, an absolute attendance requirement.   There will be a take-home mid-term essay (5 pages) and final essay (10 pages), two 2-page analyses of specific shots or scenes.  This course differs from ComLit 381 in the length of the section (2-3 hours per week instead of 75 minutes), extra work-load and additional readings.  Recommended only for students (at all levels) who have a keen interest in film.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIA

Five College Film Studies Major category: 6

 

COMLIT 384  VIETNAM: LIT & FILM     <<<<CANCELLED>>>

38878 Lecture: Monday 4:40PM – 5:30PM & Wednesday 4:40PM – 8:00PM, Ag. Engineering Bldg rm 119

38883 Discussion01 Fr 10:10AM – 11:00AM

38885 Discussion02 Fr 12:20PM – 1:10PM

38887 Discussion03 Fr 11:15AM – 12:05PM

Instructor: Edwin Gentzier          Cap90

Focus on "images" of the war as presented in poetry, fiction, and film , often comparing the same image as it has been "rewritten" in literature and film. How images are manipulated by (re)writers to reinforce or subvert powerful cultural and political institutions.  (Gen.Ed. AL,G)

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB

Five College Film Studies Major category:  5

 

COMP-LIT 385 RUSSIAN THEMES IN WORLD CINEMA

32619 Monday 7:00PM - 10:00PM Lecture, Herter Hall 217

38889 Tuesday 2:30PM - 3:45PM Discussion, Herter Hall 211

Laszlo Dienes               Cap 30

Lecture/screening/discussion. A general introduction to the art of cinema through Russian themes in world cinema. We will screen and discuss mostly Western films (American, French, and Italian, but also some Japanese and Indian) inspired by Russian culture, particularly by Russian literary works from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Some emphasis may also be placed on selected contemporary themes and on comparisons of Russian and Western approaches to film art. Requirements may include electronic quizzes, film research, papers, and presentations. Prerequisites: none other than an UMass computer account; no prior knowledge of things Russian (language, history, literature) is expected. A significant portion of the course may use resources on the Web; students may be expected to do some of the coursework electronically.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category: IIB

Five College Film Studies Major category: 5

 

COMLIT 499D CAPSTONE COURSE                               <<<<CANCELLED>>>

38901 Monday 3:35PM-7:00PM Lecture, Herter Hall 231

32646 Tuesday 2:30PM-5:30PM Discussion, Goodell Building room 406A

Instructor: Don Levine               Cap 12

Eligibility; Junior And Senior Honors Students Only

This 6-credit Capstone Course fulfills the Commonwealth college culminating- experience requirement.    We apply ourselves to the problem of cinematic vision as both process and acquired skill. We learn to distinguish the ways in which Hollywood normative cinema has constructed a visual language which we accept, uncritically, as the look reality has when screened. In turn, this "look" is examined to see how it differs from what we may see with the “naked” eye, and how it informs what we, see (what we can see, what we look for) in the world. Recommended for students who have a keen interest in film. Students attend a large lecture and film screening (once a week), an intensive seminar-style section of 2-3 hours the next day, on Thursday a film-making component for 3 hours. There will be a take-home mid-term essay (six pages) and final essay (ten pages), a two page scene analysis, and an intensive final film project (20 minutes). Students investigate aspects of film-making (such as shot formation, camera movement, editing approaches) by collaboratively exploring a range of expressive -possibilities on video. Working in groups of three or four, students start off the semester alternating roles of writer/director, camera -person, editor, etc., in constructing brief scenes. No prior film experience necessary. This 6 credit course may qualify students for high Latin Honors, if they have fulfilled other specific requirements. See a Commonwealth College advisor for more information. Preference in registration given to seniors using this course toward their culminating experience requirement, others as space permits. Contact Commonwealth College 504 Goodell to register.

Meets with COMP-LIT 381.  Students must remember to sign up for both times

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category: IIA, IV, V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  6,7, 8

 

FRENCHST  350 FRENCH FILM

Catherine Portuges, Donald Maddox

33679  Lec 1  Mo 3:30PM - 6:00PM       Herter Hall room 227                 Cap 40 (in CL350), 120 combined

33680  Dis 1  Tu 9:30AM - 10:45AM      Herter Hall room 225

33681  Dis 2  Tu 11:15AM - 12:30PM    Herter Hall room 225

33682  Dis 3  Tu 1:00PM - 2:15PM        Herter Hall room 225    

33683  Dis  4  Tu 2:30PM – 3:45PM       Herter Hall room 225

Course taught in English (with screenings).  The development of French film from the 1930s and its relations to French society.  Analysis and reading of specific films, the ideology of different film practices, and relevant aspects of film theory, including questions of representations.  Films by directors such as Vigo, CarnE, Renoir, Bresson, Resnais, Godard, Truffaut, Ackerman, Kurys, Tavernier.  (Gen. Ed. AT)

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB     

Five College Film Studies Major category:  5

 

GERMAN 304  FROM BERLIN TO HOLLYWOOD

33841 TuTh 5:30PM – 6:45PM  Lecture, School of Management rm 137

33842  Mo 5:45PM – 7:45PM Lab (screening), School of Management rm 137    

Instructor: Jonathan Skolnik, Delene White                      Cap200

An introduction to German cinema, treating Weimar Expressionism, Nazi film and anti-Nazi exile cinema, film in post-WWII East and West Germany, and German film since the fall of the Berlin Wall.

Conducted in English. (Gen.Ed. AT)

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB     

Five College Film Studies Major category:  5

 

JOURNAL 397L ST-DOCUMENTARY TRADITION IN LIT & FILM

34379 Tuesday 2:30PM – 5:15PM, Bartlett Hall room 201

Instructor: Madeleine Blais                     Cap40

This course offers an in depth exploration of the artistic and journalistic impulse to capture in words and images what the Irish call the “music of what happens”.  Sample pairings include Harvest of Shame shown in conjunction with the John Steinbeck novel, Grapes of Wrath, Capturing the Friedmans with the Susan Orlean essay, “Seriously Silly”, Dead Man Walking with Norman Mailer’s great work of literary nonfiction The Executione’s Song.  We will examine the strengths and weaknesses of varying approaches to what amounts to the same material, with a special emphasis on how the author/director honors truth and fact simultaneously.

Open to Senior, Junior and Sophomore Journalism majors only.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB     

Five College Film Studies Major category: 4, 6

 

POLISCI 201 AMERICAN POLITICS THROUGH FILM

38924 MoWed 1:25PM – 2:15PM Lecture, Herter Hall 227

Instructor: Stuart Shulman          Cap150

38926 Discussion01 Fri 9:05AM – 9:55AM

38928 Discussion02 Mo 11:15AM – 12:05PM

38931 Discussion03 Fri 10:10AM – 11:00AM

38934 Discussion04 Fri 11:15AM – 12:05AM

38935 Discussion05 Mo 10:10AM – 11:00AM

38936 Discussion06 Mo 9:05AM – 9:55AM

Motives used to explore the development of American politics in the 20th century. The forces that shaped our politics early in the century (immigration, reform, religion), the rise of "big" government in the depression and World War II years (the new roles of the federal government, the enhanced presidency, internationalism, and anti-communism), and selected issues (race, gender, modern campaigns) prominent since the 1960s. The meaning of political democracy in America and how our understanding of it has adapted to changing times and conditions.  (Gen.Ed. HS)

Optional class viewing of film mon. 9pm-11pm

Home(where possible) and library viewing of required films is acceptable.  Class viewings will include late night post viewing debates and discussions

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB     

Five College Film Studies Major category: 5

 

POLISCI 293A – S-POLITICS EUROPEAN FILM

38988 Wed 5:45PM – 8:45PM & Thur 4:00PM – 5:15PM

Instructor: Nicholas Xenos         Cap25

This course presents a series of films for discussion and analysis of revolution and reaction as political and aesthetic phenomena.  The focus will be on the European filmmakers who defined and redefined film form from the early 1920s until the late twentieth century and the relationship between form and content in their works.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB     

Five College Film Studies Major category:  5

 

SPANISH 497PP ST-SPANISH CINEMA: FROM BUNUEL TO ALMODOVAR

36052  TuTh 4:00PM - 6:30PM location  TBA    

Instructor: Jose Ornelas             Cap 30

Analysis of several films by some of the most important Spanish directors from the sixties to the present, in the context of Spanish history, society, culture and politics.  Special attention will be given to films by Buñuel, Saura and Almodóvar.  Some of the following topics will be analyzed: representation of gender; history; filmic narrative; role of religion; sexual and sociopolitical repression; violence and transgression.  Taught in English. 

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, IV           

Five College Film Studies Major category: 5

 

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<<  FALL 2009  GRADUATE FILM & VIDEO COURSES – UMASS AMHERST  >>

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COMP-LIT 695A  INTERNATIONAL FILM NOIR 

Levine

32625   W 3:35-7:35, Herter 222                         Cap 20

Lecture.  Often referred to as the only indigenous American film style, "film noir" in its very appellation reveals that its major effects (for certain modern conceptions of cinema) lay elsewhere.  We will examine film noir in its American heyday (1945-1957) and how it came to be a major propelling force in the new European cinema of the 1960's (Godard, and the Cahiers du cinema).  How film noir displaces American social mores and their constitution of "reality" within the imaginary and symbolic fields, and within the symptomatic concretization of those fields that is normative (dominant) cinema.  How film noir both makes film different and allows already latent difference to be manifested.   How film noir takes shape in the U.S. as expression of the inexpressible (and the ‘unheimlich”) or, at least, of the allusion to it; which in the lens and on the screen of directors such as Godard and Fassbinder becomes pseudomorphic, presenting a critique of American imperialism both public (political) and private (psychic) – the American way of death and love (or, as the title of one work would have it, Love & Napalm: Export USA). Films by:  American directors such as Aldritch, Ray, Fuller, Kubrick, Welles; Foreign agents such as Lang, Ophuls, Siodmak, Sirk, Von Sternberg; European directors such as Godard, Fassbinder, Wenders. 

Note:  undergrads with previous film experience may register with instructor permission.

UMass Graduate Certificate course:  “International/intercultural” category

 

Graduate students:  for the complete list of Fall 2009 graduate film courses, please see the “Graduate Film & Video Course Guide