UMass Amherst Film Courses 

UMASS AMHERST FALL 2006

ART

ART 230 PHOTOGRAPHY I

71051 Section 1 TuTh 8:00AM 10:45AM Bartlett 51 Cap:14 Instructor TBA

71052 Section 2 TuTh 1:25PM 4:10PM Bartlett 51 Cap:14 Instructor TBA

Introduction to photographic tools and methods. The balance between self-inquiry and the importance of process and materials as vehicles of meaning. Theory explored through class critiques and slide presentations. Photography examined and discussed both from a personal point of view and in its wider cultural context.

 

ART 297CC 1 LEC ST-DIGITAL MEDIA: TIME BASED

78485 M 1:25PM 3:20PM Lederle A127 Cap: 7 Michael E Coblyn,. Rosanne Retz, Susan Eve Jahoda

78486 F 1:25PM 3:20PM Lederle A127 Cap: 7 Michael E Coblyn,. Rosanne Retz, Susan Eve Jahoda

78487 Tu 9:30AM 10:45AM, Lab, Lederle A127 Cap: 7 Michael E Coblyn,. Rosanne Retz, Susan Eve Jahoda

78488 Th 9:30AM 10:45AM, Lab Lederle A217 Cap: 7 Michael E Coblyn,. Rosanne Retz, Susan Eve Jahoda

78489 W 1:25PM 3:20PM, location TBA Cap:14 Michael E Coblyn,. Rosanne Retz, Susan Eve Jahoda

 Course description not yet available.

 Open to ART, BFA-ART, and BFA-DESIGN majors only.

Requires intermediate level knowledge of Photoshop CS or consent of the instructor.

ART 297Q 1 STS ST-ANIMATION FDMTLS 3

71194 MW 9:05AM 12:05PM, FineArtCtr 440 Cap 18 Patricia Galvis-Assmus

Pre Requisite: Art 271

With studio. Introduction to methods and techniques of animation, as well as history of experimental film. Hands-on work with object, sand, line and clay animation, among others. Basic audio and video skills. Students develop projects of their own design resulting in a fully edited videotape of their work..

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ART 390/690 MEDIA AND MOTION GRAPHICS

MW 10-12 (exact beginning-end times 9:05?-11:50?), FAC 447?

P. Galvis Assmus Cap 12 in Art360 & 2 in Art690

The exploration of Media and Motion Graphics. Experimental, documentary and narrative, film titles, web based work along with interactive art is considered and used as spring board for work undertaken through out the semester focusing on successful and thought-provoking design. Expanding on basics of available software packages for creation of experimental and applied motion graphics. Knowledge of sound and image editing helpful to enrolled students. Text book: Motion Graphics Design & Fine Art Animation (Jon Krasner; Focal Press). Additional Reference: Motion Graphics: Film & TV; Ziegler, Greco, Riggs Understanding Animation; Paul Wells A Reader in Animation Studies; Jayne Pilling Type in Motion: Innovations in Digital Graphics: Bellantoni, Woolman.

For majors and non-majors

Pre-req: Art 297Q or consent of instructor

 

ART 397R 1 STS ST-PHOTO III

71193 F 9:00AM 3:00PM, Bartlett 51 Cap 30 Instructor TBA

Prerequisites:  Art 230 & 231

Students submit a proposal outlining a semester-long project. An audio-visual presentation focusing on all the influences related to the project also required. Class time divided between critiques, discussions based on readings, presentations and technical demonstrations. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

 

ART 397DD 1 STS ST-ADVANCED COLOR PHOTOGRAPHY

77425 F 9:05AM 3:00PM, Bartlett 51 Cap 13 Instructor TBA

Course description not yet available.

 

ART 597JJ -DIGITAL MEDIA: TIME BASED

78452 M 1:25PM 3:20PM Lederle A127 Cap: 7 Michael E Coblyn,. Rosanne Retz, Susan Eve Jahoda

78453 F 1:25PM 3:20PM Lederle A127 Cap: 7 Michael E Coblyn,. Rosanne Retz, Susan Eve Jahoda

78483 Tu 9:30AM 10:45AM, Lab, Lederle A127 Cap: 7 Michael E Coblyn,. Rosanne Retz, Susan Eve Jahoda

78488 Th 9:30AM 10:45AM, Lab Lederle A217 Cap: 7 Michael E Coblyn,. Rosanne Retz, Susan Eve Jahoda

78484 W 1:25PM 3:20PM, location TBA Cap:14 Michael E Coblyn,. Rosanne Retz, Susan Eve Jahoda

Course description not yet available.

 

ART 597Q 1 STS ST-ANIMATION FNDMTLS

71201 TuTh 9:30AM 12:30PM, FineArtCtr 439 Cap 2 Patricia Galvis-Assmus

With studio. Introduction to methods and techniques of animation, as well as history of experimental film. Hands-on work with object, sand, line and clay animation, a-mong others. Basic audio and video skills. Students develop projects of their own design resulting in a fully edited videotape of their work. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

 

ART 697J 1 STS ST-COMP ANIMATION I 3

77454 MW 1:25PM 4:10PM, FineArtCtr 447 Cap 5 Patricia Galvis-Assmus

With studio. Principles and applications of computer animation in film, video, music and technology. Introduction to 2-D and 3-D animation programs. Skills acquired in preparation for production in second semester. Emphasis on professionalism and quality. Prerequisite: ART 597Q or consent of instructor.

 

COMMUNICATION

 

COMM 231 FILM & TV PRODUCTION CONCEPTS

78627 TuTh 4:00- 5:15PM , location TBA Cap 150 Bruce Geisler

Lecture, discussion. This class provides an overview of film and television production principles and processes from script to screen and also prepares students for later hands-on production courses. We will explore both the art and craft of film and video production, including the roles and functions of the major creative and technical personnel in the scripting/ pre-production, production and post-production phases. Technical aspects such as digital vs. analog media, lighting, lenses, types of film and videotape, crew organization and function, editing concepts, sound recording, etc. will be discussed, as well as creative functions such as dramatic and documentary structure, creating characters, acting for the screen, visualization and composition for the camera and more. (Course capacity is 150)

Course Eligibility*: COMM & CAS majors or students who have already taken COMM 118 or 121.

Course Notes: Formerly numbered COMM 297D. If you have already taken COMM 297D you cannot take this course. Honors Colloquium available.

 

COMM 240 MODES OF FILM

78689 TuTh 4:00-5:15 lecture, T 7:30-10:30pm Cap 53

Shimpach 408 Machmer (New Faculty beginning in the Fall 2006 Semester)

Lecture, lab (screening). The nature and functions of film, including narrative and non-narrative approaches to film communication. Topics will include: the components of film expression (composition, movement, editing, sound, directing, and acting); designs in screen narrative; film's relationship to other arts and media; and its role as an instrument of social reflection and change. (Course capacity is 53)

Course Eligibility*: Freshman & Sophomore COMM majors

*Film Studies Certificate students who do not meet the above eligibility criteria should contact Film Studies (129 Herter Annex, 545-3659, film@hfa.umass.edu) to enroll.

 

COMM 331 PROGRAM PROCESS IN TV

72815 W 10:10-11:00am, lecture, location TBA Cap 36 David Maxcy

72816 L1 LAB M 1:25-4:25pm, SouthCollg 120 Cap 12 staff

72817 L2 LAB W 1:25-4:25pm, SouthCollg 120 Cap 12 staff

72818 L3 LAB F 9:05-12:05pm, SouthCollg 120 Cap 12 staff

Lecture, studio. Introduction to concepts and techniques of television production, through lectures, lab exercises, and guided production projects. All 3 sections will meet together once a week for a 50-minute lecture with the course director. Each section will then meet once a week for a 3-hour lab session. (Course capacity is 36)

Course Eligibility*: Senior, Junior & Sophomore COMM majors only.

 

COMM 340 HISTORY OF FILM I

72819 1 TTh 1:00-2:15pm, Herter 227 Cap 125 Martin Norden

72820 L1 LAB 6:00-8:00pm, Herter 227 Cap 125 Martin Norden

Lecture, lab (screening). A survey of key events and representative films that mark the his¬tory of motion pictures in the United States and other countries to 1950. In addition to identify¬ing and providing access to major works, the course is designed to facilitate the study of the various influences (industrial, technological, aesthetic, social, cultural, and politi¬cal) that have shaped the evolution of the medium to the advent of television. (Course capacity is 150)

Course Eligibility*: Senior and Junior COMM majors; OR any student who has taken COMM 240 or COMM 397T.

 

COMM 393B 01 S-INTERM VIDEO PRODUCTION & THEORY

72946 LEC W 9:30-12:30PM, Lederle A127 Cap 10 Hillman

78412 L1 LAB Tu 7:00-9:00PM, SouthColl 108 Hillman

Hillman (5-College Film Faculty)

Lecture, Studio. This is an intermediate video production/theory course for students interested in exploring a wide range of approaches to narrative, documentary and experimental videomaking. Students will gain experience in production and postproduction techniques and will learn to think about and look critically at the moving and still image. The class will concentrate on the development of individual approaches to directing, performance, text, sound and image. Students will complete several collaborative and individual projects for the course and will also write responses to critical readings and weekly screenings. The course will include workshops in non-linear editing, cinematography, and lighting.

*Enrollment with permission of instructor by application only. For applications, please email the instructor at bhillman@hampshire.edu.

Application deadline: April 14, 2006. (Course capacity is 10)

Course Eligibility*: Permission of instructor--application is required. Students cannot add this course through SPIRE.

COMM 397B ST-INTRO STUDIO DIRECTING

72947 01 LEC Tu 11:15- 3:15pm, HerterAnnex basement TV studio Cap 10

David Maxcy

Lecture, studio. Students will learn basic concepts and techniques of studio television production, with a focus on directing live programs in a full-scale studio facility on the UMASS campus. The course includes lecture presentations, production exercises, script-writing projects, and studio production projects. Finally, each student will write, produce, and direct a live studio production. (Course capacity is 10)

Course Eligibility*: Senior, Junior & Sophomore COMM majors

Course Notes: If have taken COMM 433 you CANNOT take this course.

 

COMM 441 PRIN&TECHN FILM-STYLE PRODUCTION

72850 W 1:25-5:25pm, SouthColl 108 Cap 12 Bruce Geisler

Hands-on introduction to single-camera filmmaking using 16mm film cameras and/or digital video camcorders (electronic field production) and non-linear (computer-based) editing. Students learn concepts of pre-production, shot composition, lighting, visual story telling, continuity editing, and production and post-production audio as they plan, shoot, and edit exercises and complete projects.

Only COMM Juniors and Seniors who have completed either COMM 297D or COMM 331may add this course through SPIRE. Others may add only through permission of the instructor. Students who do not meet the prerequisites for this class may fill out an application available from the instructor. (Office: Machmer 411).

 

COMM 493E/LEC 1 SEM- SCREENWRITING

72851 LEC TuTh 11:15-12:30PM, SouthColl 108 Cap 20 Martin Norden

Lecture, discussion. An examination of the art, craft, and business of screenwriting from theoretical and practical perspectives. Topics included: the nature of screenplay formats and structures; creation and development of premise, plot, character, and action; scene writing; adaptation issues; place of the screenwriter in the collaborative process of filmmaking; and marketing strategies. The focus will be on scriptwriting for storytelling movies and, to a limited extent, TV programs. In-class activities will include exercises in visual thinking, scene analyses, and staged readings. Written work will include several screenwriting projects.

(Course capacity is 20)

Course Eligibility*: Senior & Junior COMM majors

 

COMM 493E/LEC 2: SEMINAR-SCREENWRITING

72934 LEC TuTh 2:30-3:45PM, SouthColl 108 Cap 20 Bruce Geisler

Geisler 411 Machmer

Lecture, discussion. An examination of the art, craft, and business of screenwriting from theoretical and practical perspectives. Topics include screenplay format and structure, story, plot and character development, dialog and scene description, visual storytelling, pace and rhythm, analysis of professional and student scripts and films, and more. Written work includes three screenwriting projects. The focus is on writing for narrative films and, to a limited extent, TV programs. (Course capacity is 20)

Course Eligibility*: Senior & Junior COMM majors

 

COMM 49700 SEM-ARAB CINEMA

77550 TuTh 1:00-2:15pm, SouthColl 108 Cap 25 Anne Ciecko

77551 W 7:30-10:30pm, SOM 137 Cap 25

Lecture, lab, discussion. Student enrolled in this class must attend class meetings on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 1:00-2:15pm in South College 108, as well as the weekly screenings of the Arab film series coordinated in conjunction with this course, in SOM 137 on Wednesdays 7:30-10:30 p.m. This new film studies course focuses on diverse cinematic productions from Arab states and communities—including Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Tunisia, the United Arab Emirates, Yemen, and diasporic Arab filmmaking in North America and Europe—as well as some non-Arab cinema from the Middle East (e.g. Iranian filmmaking in Iraqi Kurdistan), from and/or about Africa (representations of Berbers in the Maghreb countries and Dinkas in southern Sudan and in exile), and from Islamic Asia. Readings and lecture material will address historical background and development of Arab cinemas with emphasis on contemporary trends; aesthetics and formal strategies of narrative filmmaking (including the important relationships between cinema and other cultural forms such as music, literature, visual arts, and oral storytelling); and modes of production, exhibition, distribution, and audience/reception. Topics to be discussed also include cultural politics and state policies; multiethnicity, religion, and language/dialect; national and pan-Arab/transnational identities; gender issues; Orientalism and media stereotypes; colonialism, postcolonialism and neocolonialism; film financing, international co-productions, regional film markets, cross-over audiences, and international film festivals as showcases for Arab cinema. The emphasis in this course will be on Arab feature films (a sampling of vintage classics, and numerous commercially-produced and independent contemporary features), but we will also examine some narrative and experimental shorts and documentary work. (Course capacity is 25.)

Course Eligibility*: Senior & Junior Comm majors;OR any junior or senior who has taken one of the following courses: Comm 240, Comm 297D, or Comm 397T; OR permission of instructor. (Interested graduate students should contact the professor to discuss options.)

Course Prerequisite: No prerequisites, but some introductory background in film studies is recommended.

 

COMM 693D SEM-INTRO TO FILM THEORY

77536 M 6:00-9:45pm, SouthColl 108 Cap 10 Anne Ciecko

This course will offer an overview of the major theoretical approaches to the study of international film. We will examine various formalist and realist film theories (which together constitute "classical" film theory), as well as theoretical and critical methods informed by structuralism, semiology, phenomenol­ogy, psychoanalysis, political theory, and contemporary cultural studies. These may include auteurism, feminism/gender studies and queer theory, genre studies, alternative aesthetics (including concepts of "third cinema"), historical spectator/audience/ reception, star and performance studies, apparatus theory (film, video, and "new media"), and postcolonial theory (issues of racial/ethnic and national identities, as well as globalization). Students will be responsible for watching films outside class on a regular basis. No prerequisites except a strong interest in international cinema. (Course capacity is 10)Open to Masters and Doctoral COMM Graduate students.

 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

 

COMLIT 381 SELF-REFLECTIVE AVANT-GARDE FILM

74945 Lec. M 3:35-7:00PM. Herter 231 Cap 120 Don Levine

74946 Discussion Tu 2:30-3:45, location TBA Cap 30 Staff

74947 Discussion Tu 2:30-3:45, location TBA Cap 30 Staff

74948 Discussion Tu 4:00-5:15, location TBA Cap 30 Staff

74949 Discussion Tu 7:00-8:15, location TBA Cap 30 Staff

Lecture, discussion. Explores modern origin of film experimentation in avant-garde modes such as Expressionism, Surrealism and contemporary results of this heritage. Trying to determine if film is the most resolutely modern of the media, we'll look at cinema as the result of two obsessive concerns: 1) the poetic, dreamlike and fantastic, 2) the factual, realistic and socially critical or anarchistic. Thus, we'll attempt to discover how modern culture deals with avant-garde imperatives to always "make it new.” Films and filmmakers such as Breathless (Godard), My Own Private Idaho (Lang), The American Soldier ( Fassbinder), others. Requirements: one 5-page paper for midterm, ten-page final paper or project; attendance

 

COMLIT 381H SELF-REFLECTIVE AVANT-GARDE FILM

 

77562 Lec. M 3:35-7:00PM, Herter 231 Cap 4 Don Levine

77563 Discussion TuTh 2:30-4:30, location TBA Cap 4 Don Levine

 

We will apply ourselves to the problem of vision itself as an acquired skill, learning to distinguish the various ways in which Hollywood normative cinema has constructed a code both visual and narrative which we accept, uncritically, as the standard by which reality gets transposed to the screen. This code is examined – how it differs from what we actually see with the “naked” eye and how it, in turn, influences what we see (what we can see, what we look for) in the world. Various forms of avant-garde film are examined so that we come to imagine how it might be otherwise (films by directors such as Dreyer, Lang, Man Ray, Bunuel, Vertov, Godard, Fassbinder, Egoyan, and Van Sant). Students will attend a large lecture and film screening (once a week) and, the next day, an intensive seminar-style section of 2-3 hours. Here we present and discuss new material, some from readings, and, occasionally, screenings of additional films and film clips. The course is incremental and there is thus an absolute attendance requirement. There will be a take-home mid-term essay (5 pages) and final essay (10 pages), two 2-page analyses of specific shots or scenes, and an approved self-directed project. This course differs from COMLIT 381 in the length of the section (2-3 hours per week instead of 75 minutes,) extra workload and additional readings. Recommended only for students (at all levels) who have a keen interest in film. There is an optional hands-on colloquium for 1 extra credit.

COMLIT385 RUSSIAN THEMES IN WORLD CINEMA

74942 Lecture, M 7:00-10:00PM, Herter 231 Cap 30 Laszlo Dienes

77564 Discussion Tu 2:30-3:45PM, location TBA Cap 30 Laszlo Dienes

Lecture/screening/discussion. A general introduction to the art of cinema through Russian themes in Western films (mostly American, French, and Italian) inspired by Russian culture, particularly by Russian literary works from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Some emphasis also on selected contemporary themes (violence, youth culture, race and gender issues), and on comparisons of Russian and Western approaches to film art. Requirements include electronic quizzes, short papers, and presentations. Prerequisites: none other than an OIT computer account; no prior knowledge of things Russian (language, history, literature) is expected. A significant portion of the course will use resources on the Web; students will be expected to do some of the coursework electronically.

 

695A INTERNATIONAL FILM NOIR

74951 Lecture W 2:30-6:30PM, location TBA Cap 10 Don Levine

 

Lecture. Often referred to as the only indigenous American film style, "film noir" in its very appellation reveals that its major effects (for certain modern conceptions of cinema) lay elsewhere. We will examine film noir in its American heyday (1945-1957) and how it came to be a major propelling force in the new European cinema of the 1960's (Godard, and the Cahiers ducinema). How film noir displaces American social mores and their constitution of "reality" within the imaginary and symbolic fields, and within the symptomatic concretization of those fields that is normative (dominant) cinema. How film noir both makes film different and allows already latent difference to be manifested. How film noir takes shape in the U.S. as expression of the inexpressible (and the ‘unheimlich”) or, at least, of the allusion to it; which in the lens and on the screen of directors such as Godard and Fassbinder becomes pseudomorphic, presenting a critique of American imperialism both public (political) and private (psychic) – the American way of death and love (or, as the title of one work would have it, Love & Napalm: Export USA). Films by: American directors such as Aldritch, Ray, Fuller, Kubrick, Welles; Foreign agents such as Lang, Ophuls, Siodmak, Sirk, Von Sternberg; European directors such as Godard, Fassbinder, Wenders. Prerequisite: 2 prior film courses or permission of Instructor.

 

ENGLISH

 

ENGLISH 298A 1 PRA PRAC-SHAKESPEARE ON FILM

78461 M 6:30PM 9:00PM, location TBA Cap 35 Kirby Farrell

**Mandatory Pass/Fail course.

NOTE: This course does NOT count toward the UMASS Film Studies Certificate requirements.

This series screens classic Shakespeare performances, one film each week. 1 credit. To enroll: at the first session, the projectionist will record the participants' names, student numbers, and email addresses so the English Deptartment can register them on SPIRE

 

ENGLISH 298B 1 PRA PRAC-LITERARY CLASSICS ON FILM

78462 W 6:30PM 9:00PM, location TBA Cap 35 Kirby Farrell

** Mandatory Pass/Fail course.

NOTE: This course does NOT count toward the UMASS Film Studies Certificate requirements.

This series presents screen adaptations of great novels that have shaped western literature, beginning with Cervantes' Don Quixote. Authors include Austen, Thackeray, Dickens, Eliot, James, Hardy, Flaubert, and E M Forster. One film each week: 1 credit. To enroll: at the first session, the projectionist will record the participants' names, student numbers, and email addresses so the English Department can register them on SPIRE.

 

FRENCH

 

FRENCH 350 1 LEC FRENCH FILM 3

75596 M 3:30PM 6:00PM M Herter 227 (Lecture/screening) Cap 80 Donald Maddox

75597 Tu 9:30AM 10:45AM Location TBA (Discussion) Cap 20 Donald Maddox

75598 Tu 11:15AM 12:30PM Location TBA (Discussion) Cap 20 Donald Maddox

75599 Tu 1:00PM 2:15PM Location TBA (Discussion) Cap 20 Donald Maddox

75600 Tu 2:30PM 3:45PM Location TBA (Discussion) Cap 20 Donald Maddox

 

A survey of the development of French cinema, emphasizing works from the New Wave forward, and with special attention to younger contemporary filmmakers.  Formal, stylistic, institutional, social, and ideological aspects of these film practices in relation to their antecedents in the French film tradition and with respect to issues of diversity and gender representation, with a focus on close readings of films in French with English subtitles.  Requirements:  mandatory attendance at lectures and discussion sections; response papers, short quizzes, final exam and a research paper.  A one credit Honors colloquium (FR350 HO2) conducted in French is offered by arrangement as a supplement to the course. Crosslisted with CompLit 391B.

 

ITALIAN

 

ITALIAN 450 - ITALIAN AMERICAN FILM: EVERYDAY VIOLENCE (xlist JUD497D)

75812 W 6:15-9:15, lecture, Herter 227 Cap 150 Jennifer Stone

NOTE: Course taught in ENGLISH. Majors and Minors read texts in original Italian language.
Studies films made by Italian American directors who are influenced by Italian neo-realism and other European traditions. Also charts accomplishments of Italian-American actors. Key directors from the East Coast School (Scorsese, De Niro, Ferrara & Savoca & newly emergent Buscemi, Turturro and Mottola) and from Europe and beyond (Wenders, Scott and Bennett) are contrasted with those whose work is derived from the Hollywood code (Coppola, Leone, & Tarantino). The link between Jews and Italians is exposed via Leone, Allen, Ramis, Scorsese, Levinson and Chase in movies/TV series such as Analyze This, The Sopranos, Once Upon a time in America, Broadway Danny Rose, Casino & Bugsy Films include: Italian-American, The Big Shave, Who's that knocking at my door? Mean Streets, Raging Bull, New York Stories, The Conversation, Rumble Fish, True Romance, Reservoir Dogs, Pulp Fiction, A Bronx Tale, The Bad Lieutenant, Household Saints, The Funeral, Kiss or Kill, Donnie Brasco, Romeo & Juliet, The End of Violence among others. Viewings of supplementary unreleased or restored footage, interviews, commentaries etc. Readings include recent biographies of Scorsese & Coppola and essays and interviews by the directors and film editor Murch. Shot-by-shot & frame-by-frame analysis of key shots and plan séquences. Theoretical readings include Freud's Psychopathology of Everyday Life and letter to Einstein, "Why War?"
Cross-listed with Italian 450.

For more details, see javari.com.

 

ITALIAN 490B - NOVEL INTO FILM: SCREEN MEMORIES

75813 W 2:30-5:30, lecture, Herter 231 Cap 50 Jennifer Stone

Pasolini's definition of relationship between screenplay and director's cut applies to novel into scenario, shooting script, and film (and reverse, film into novel). We deconstruct "adaptation" through theories of "translation" or "transference" after Freud, Benjamin, Bloom, Calvino, Chion, Derrida, and Sontag; Screenwriters: Adair, Cecchi d'Amico, Schiffman).Contrast European and Hollywood cinema methods and structures. Questions of origin, originality, ambivalence, and sublimation; focal lens work for architecture, space, panoramic distance, and close-up; function of auditory sphere (dialogue, soundtrack, music, offscreen and voice over).

Screenwriting/videomaking option.

Selections from TEXTS: Novels, screenplays, shooting scripts, and set diaries; film and psychoanalytic theory;directors' memoirs, interviews and writings.

DIRECTORS: Antonioni, Bertolucci, Cocteau, De Sica, Disney, Farberbock, Godard, Hitchcock, Huston, Kentridge, Korda, Kubrick, Litvak, Merlet, Ophuls, Pasolini, Polonsky, Pontecorvo, Rafelson, Rossellini, Savoca, Spielberg.

 

JOURNALISM

 

JOURNAL 397L ST- DOCUMENTARY TRADITION IN LIT & FILM

75848 M 2:30-5:30pm, location TBA Cap 30 Madeleine Blais

This course offers an in depth exploration of the artistic and journalistic impulse to capture in words and images what the Irish call the “music of what happens.” Sample pairings include “Harvest of Shame” shown in conjunction with the John Steinbeck novel, Grapes of Wrath, “Capturing the Friedmans” with the Susan Orlean essay, Seriously Silly, “Dead Man Walking” with Norman Mailer’s great work of literary nonfiction The Executioner’s Song.  We will examine the strengths and weaknesses of varying approaches to what amounts to the same material, with a special emphasis on how the author/director honors truth and fact simultaneously.

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Open to Journalism and Pre-Journalism majors only.

 

JUDAIC

 

JUDAIC 344 FILM AND SOCIETY IN ISRAEL
78413 T 4-7 PM, lecture, location TBA Cap 25 Olga Gershenson

This course uses cinema to introduce students to an array of issues that define Israel, such as foundation of Israel, Israeli-Palestinian conflict, as well as ethnic, religious, and gender identities. Discussion includes a brief survey of Israeli history and film-making. All film screenings are with English subtitles. Tuesday 4-7 PM

 

JUDAIC 491B NOVEL INTO FILM: SCREEN MEMORIES

75813 W 2:30-5:30, lecture, Herter 231 Cap 50 Jennifer Stone
Course taught in English. Pasolini's definition of a relationship between screenplay and director's cut applies to novel into scenario, shooting script, and film (and reverse, film into novel). We deconstruct "adaptation" through theories of "translation: or "transference" after Freud, Benjamin, Bloom, Calvino, Chion, Derrida, and Sontag; Secreenwriters: Adair, Cecchi d'Amico, Schiffman. Contrast European and Hollywood cinema methods and structures. Questions of origin, originality, ambivalence, and sublimination; focal lens work for architecture, space, panoramic distance, and close-up; function of auditory sphere (dialogue, soundtrack, music, offscreen and voice over).

 

JUDAIC 497D ITALIAN AMERICAN FILM: "VISIONS OF EVERYDAY VIOLENCE"
75907 W 6:15PM 9:15PM, lecture, Herter 227 Cap 50 Jennifer Stone

NOTE: Course taught in ENGLISH. Majors and Minors read texts in original Italian language.
Studies films made by Italian American directors who are influenced by Italian neo-realism and other European traditions. Also charts accomplishments of Italian-American actors. Key directors from the East Coast School (Scorsese, De Niro, Ferrara & Savoca & newly emergent Buscemi, Turturro and Mottola) and from Europe and beyond (Wenders, Scott and Bennett) are contrasted with those whose work is derived from the Hollywood code (Coppola, Leone, & Tarantino). The link between Jews and Italians is exposed via Leone, Allen, Ramis, Scorsese, Levinson and Chase in movies/TV series such as Analyze This, The Sopranos, Once Upon a time in America, Broadway Danny Rose, Casino & Bugsy Films include: Italian-American, The Big Shave, Who's that knocking at my door? Mean Streets, Raging Bull, New York Stories, The Conversation, Rumble Fish, True Romance, Reservoir Dogs, Pulp Fiction, A Bronx Tale, The Bad Lieutenant, Household Saints, The Funeral, Kiss or Kill, Donnie Brasco, Romeo & Juliet, The End of Violence among others. Viewings of supplementary unreleased or restored footage, interviews, commentaries etc. Readings include recent biographies of Scorsese & Coppola and essays and interviews by the directors and film editor Murch. Shot-by-shot & frame-by-frame analysis of key shots and plan séquences. Theoretical readings include Freud's Psychopathology of Everyday Life and letter to Einstein, "Why War?"
Cross-listed with Italian 450.

For more details, see javari.com.

MUSIC

 

MUSIC 170H MUSIC IN FILM

78636 TuTh 1:00PM 2:15PM, lecture, FineArtCtr 44 Cap 25 Roger Rideout

The use of music in film, a "grand tour" of the aesthetics and dramatic techniques of film music since 1895. Excerpts from "silent era" and sound films will be viewed and studied as examples of film music development and the composer's art. (Gen.Ed. AT)

SPANISH AND PORTUGESE

 

SPANISH 497LL ST-LATINO/A FILM

78606 MW 4:00PM 6:30PM, lecture, location TBA Cap 25 Guilermo Irizarry

Course description not yet available.

 

SPANISH 797A 1 LEC ST-WOMEN AND FILM

78137 MW 1:25PM 4:00PM, lecture, location TBA Cap 10 Barbara Zecchi A close examination of the evolution of Spanish cinema by women directors and scriptwriters through the viewpoint of gender and film theories. We will tackle topics such as the female gaze, visual pleasure, pornography, the representation of the body, the female spectator and the question of authority. In particular we will address the validity of applying US filmic theory to Spanish cinema.

Taught in Spanish.

 

THEATER

 THEATER 397D ST-PLAYS TO MOVIES:COSTM INTRP

74755 TuTh 2:30PM 3:45PM FineArtCtr 201 Cap 25 Patricia Warner

This course will explore the role of costume design in a series of movies that have been made from plays, from the 1900s to the 1990s. Students will learn how critical the costuming is in placing the movie in its own time frame, and in interpreting the play's period. Students will be required to read the original plays, watch the subsequent movie(s) and write papers on the actualizations from word to film as they relate to costume.