FALL 2005
UMASS and
FIVE COLLEGE
FILM & VIDEO COURSE GUIDE

(updated 9/13/05 )

 

Note : We are experimenting with a new format for the Fall 05 course guide. You will find:

Section 1. a short list of courses still available at last update

Section 2. course offerings (with descriptions) at each campus divided into “production” or “non-production” courses.

 

Section 1.

(We will be updating 4 College course availabilities tomorrow. All course availability is subject to change at any minute, so don’t wait to enroll! If you are unable to register on-line, please contact the instructor or go to the next class meeting. For course descriptions, please see the complete listings in section 2.)

Section 1. Short list of UMASS and Mount Holyoke courses still available as of Tues Sept 13th 5:00pm

(We will be updating 4 College course availabilities tomorrow. All course availability is subject to change at any minute, so don’t wait to enroll! If you are unable to register on-line, please contact the instructor or go to the next class meeting. For course descriptions, please see the complete listings in section 2.)

 

UMASS courses available:

ART 230 1 STS PHOTOGRAPHY I    Open 2 Cap 14

30956 Tibbo,Jennifer C.    8:00AM 10:45AM TuTh Bartlett 51

ART 297Q ST-ANIMATION FDMTLS   Open 8 Cap 18

38751 Benn,Janet A    9:30AM 12:30PM TuTh FineArtCtr 439

ART 397R 1 STS ST-PHOTO III Open 30 Cap 30

38502 Jahoda,Susan Eve   9:00AM 3:00PM F Bartlett 51

ART 497R 1 STS ST-RESEARCH/COMP ART Open 8 Cap10

31092 Galvis-Assmus,Patricia    9:05AM 3:00PM F FineArtCtr 445

ART 597Q 1 STS ST- ANIMATION FDMTLS Open 2 Cap 2

38759 Benn,Janet A 9:30AM 12:30PM TuTh FineArtCtr 439

ART 697J 1 STS ST-COMP ANIMATION I Open 5 Cap 5

31098 Benn,Janet A    1:25PM 4:10PM MW FineArtCtr 447

ART 791C 1 SEM Sem-GRADUATE COMP ARTS Open 2 Cap 6

31095 Jahoda,Susan Eve    4:40PM 7:30PM TuTh FineArtCtr 448

COMM 240 01 LEC MODES OF FILM COMMUNICATION Open 18 Cap 125

32168 Norden,Martin F 4:00PM 5:15PM TuTh Thompson 102

   with mandatory lab:

COMM 240 L1 LAB Modes of Film Communication Open 18 Cap 125

38816 Norden,Martin F 5:30PM 7:30PM Tu Thompson 106

NOTE for COMM240: UMASS Film Certificate students who do not meet the SPIRE criteria, may come to the Film Studies office in 129 Herter Annex to enroll in this course.

COMM 297D 1 LEC ST-FILM&TV PRODUCTION CONCEPTS 3 Open 1 Cap 120

32066 Geisler,Bruce H. 4:00PM 5:15PM TuTh HasLabAdd 126

NOTE for COMM297D: UMASS Film Certificate students who do not meet the SPIRE criteria, may come to the Film Studies office in 129 Herter Annex to enroll in this course.

COMM 340 1 LEC HISTORY OF FILM I Open 22 Cap 125

Anderson, Carolyn 1:00PM 2:15PM Tu Herter 227

   with mandatory lab:

COMM 340 L1 LAB History Of Film I Open 22 Cap 125

6:00PM 8:00PM Tu Herter 227

   with the following available discussion sections:

32076 COMM 340 D4 DIS HISTORY OF FILM I Open 4 Cap 25

Dilip,Meghana 9:05AM 10:05AM W SouthCollg 108

38823 COMM 340 D5 DIS HISTORY OF FILM I Open 19    Cap 25

Dilip,Meghana 8:00AM 8:50AM W SouthCollg 108

COMM 393B 01 LEC S-INTERM VIDEO ART PRODUCTION Open 3 Cap 12

39605 Perlin,Jenny 10:10AM 1:00PM W Machmer E-30D

   with mandatory lab:

39606 COMM 393B L1 LAB S-Interm Video Art Production 0 Open 3 Cap 12

Perlin,Jenny 7:00PM 9:00PM Tu SouthCollg 108

COMM 493I 1 LEC Sem-AMER CINEMA 60'S 3 Open 0 Cap 20

38830 Anderson,Carolyn    4:30PM 6:30PM MW SouthCollg 108

COMM 597G 01 LEC ST-FILM & FASCISM: Propaganda,Resistance,Memory

Open 25 Cap 30

39610 Byg,Barton 1:00PM 2:15PM Tu Herter 217 and 1:00PM 2:15PM Th Herter 227

   with mandatory lab:

39611 COMM 597G L1 LAB ST-Film & Fascism: Propaganda Open 25 Cap 30

Byg,Barton B 6:00PM 10:00PM Th Herter 227

COMP-LIT 381 1 LEC SELF-REFLCTVE AVANT-GARDE FLM Open 30 Cap120

38837 Levine,Don Eric    3:35PM 7:00PM M Herter 231

   with the following available discussion sections:

38838 COMP-LIT 381 D01 DIS Self-Reflectve Avant-Garde Flm Open 2 Cap 30

Yacavone,Peter A. 2:30PM 3:45PM Tu Herter 207

38839 COMP-LIT 381 D02 DIS Self-Reflectve Avant-Garde Flm Open 5 Cap 30 Vangel,Scott D    2:30PM 3:45PM Tu Machmer W-23

38840 COMP-LIT 381 D03 DIS Self-Reflectve Avant-Garde Flm Open 14 Cap30 Vangel,Scott D    4:00PM 5:15PM Tu Herter 102

38841 COMP-LIT 381 D04 DIS Self-Reflectve Avant-Garde Flm Open 9 Cap30 Yacavone,Peter A.    7:00PM 8:15PM Tu Herter 207

COMP-LIT 385 01 LEC RUSSIAN THEMES WORLD CINEMA Open 19 Cap 25

   Cross-listed as RUSSIAN 391A

32591 Dienes,Laszlo 7:00PM 10:00PM M Herter 231

   with mandatory discussion section:

38842 COMP-LIT 385 D01 DIS Russian Themes World Cinema Open19 Cap 25 Dienes,Laszlo    2:30PM 3:45PM Tu Herter 206

COMP-LIT 391B 1 SEM S-FRENCH FILM Open 38 Cap 48

   Cross-listed as FRENCH 350

32513 Maddox,Donald & Portuges,Catherine 3:30PM 6:00PM M Herter 227

with the following mandatory discussion sections available:

32565 COMP-LIT 391B D1 DIS S-French Film Open 10 Cap12

Collins,Christian J 9:30AM 10:45AM Tu Herter 206

   32566 COMP-LIT 391B D2 DIS S-French Film Open 7 Cap 12

   Calandra,Nicole M. 11:15AM 12:30PM Tu Bartlett 127

   32567 COMP-LIT 391B D3 DIS S-French Film Open 12 Cap 12

   Calandra,Nicole M.    1:00PM 2:15PM Tu Herter 206

   32568 COMP-LIT 391B D4 DIS S-French Film Open 9 Cap 12

Hartlen,Neil C    2:30PM 3:45PM Tu HasLabAdd 111

COMP-LIT 497F 1 LEC ST: INTL. FILM NOIR Open 3 Cap 15

39884 Levine,Don Eric    2:30PM 6:30PM W Tobin 304

COMP-LIT 597D 1 LEC ST-FILM AND FASCISM Open 27 Cap 30

   Cross-listed as COMM597G & GERMAN597C

39481 Byg,Barton 1:00PM 2:15PM Tu Herter217 & 1:00PM 2:15PM Th Herter 227

with mandatory lab:

39482 COMP-LIT 597D L1 LAB ST-Film and Fascism Open 27 Cap 30

Byg,Barton B 6:00PM 10:00PM Th Herter 227

FRENCHST 350 1 LEC FRENCH FILM Open 10 Cap 72

   Cross-listed as COMLIT 391B

34125 Maddox,Donald & Portuges,Catherine 3:30PM 6:00PM M Herter 227

   with mandatory discussion sections available:

   34126 FRENCHST 350 D1 DIS French Film Open 7 Cap 18

   Collins,Christian J    9:30AM 10:45AM Tu Herter 206

   34127 FRENCHST 350 D2 DIS French Film Open 3 Cap18

   Calandra,Nicole M.    11:15AM 12:30PM Tu Bartlett 127

   34128 FRENCHST 350 D3 DIS French Film Open 0 Cap18

Calandra,Nicole M.    1:00PM 2:15PM Tu Herter 206

GERMAN 597C 1 LEC ST-FILM AND FASCISM Open 22 Cap 30

Cross-listed as COMM597G & COMPLIT597D

39083 Byg,Barton 1:00PM 2:15PM Tu Herter 217 & 1:00PM 2:15PM Th Herter 227

with mandatory lab:

39084 GERMAN 597C L01 LAB ST-Film and Fascism Open 22 Cap 30

Byg,Barton B 6:00PM 10:00PM Th Herter 227

ITALIAN 490B 1 LEC NOVEL INTO FILM Open 40 Cap 45

39141 Stone,Jennifer A. 2:30PM 5:30PM Tu Bartlett 61

JUDAIC 392C 01 LEC S-FILM & SOCIETY IN ISRAEL Open 0Cap 20

39193 Gershenson,Olga    5:30PM 8:00PM Tu SOM 133

MUSIC 170H 1 LEC MUSIC IN FILM Open 4 Cap 25 N

39714 Rideout,Roger R    1:00PM 2:15PM TuTh FineArtCtr 154

Open to Freshman Honors students only.

RUSSIAN 391A 01 SEM S-RUSSIAN THEMES WORLD CINEMA Open 4 Cap 5

   Cross-listed as COMPLIT 385

39547 Dienes,Laszlo      7:00PM 10:00PM M Herter 231

   with mandatory discussion section:

39548 RUSSIAN 391A D1 DIS S-Russian Themes World Cinema Open 4 Cap 5 Dienes,Laszlo    2:30PM 3:45PM Tu Herter 206

THEATER 397D 1 LEC ST-PLAYS TO MOVIES:COSTM INTRP Open 6 Cap 25

39341 Warner,Patricia C    2:30PM 3:45PM TuTh FineArtCtr 201

THEATER 499C 1 LEC HNRS CPSTN: WRITING:STAGE/SCRN Open 0 Cap 12

39348 Olf,Julian M    9:00AM 11:00AM TuTh FineArtCtr 112

2 semester course. Admission to non-seniors and/or persons not affiliated with ComCol will be on a space-available and case-specific basis after eligible ComCol seniors have been enrolled.

 

MOUNT HOLYOKE courses available

 

FS 210 PRODUCTION WORKSHOP /MOVING IMAGE Open 6 Cap 6

Wed 7-9pm (screening) & Thurs 9-12

FILMST 320: SEM: MODERNISM & THE CINEMA Open 21 Cap 25

Tu 7:00-9:00pm (screening) & W 1:00- 3:50pm   Art 220/221

R. Blaetz

ECON 100 (02) ECONOMICS IN POPULAR FILM Open 5 Cap 17

S. Gabriel   MW 11:00-12:15pm and M 7-10pm (screening) Skinner 212

First-year seminar (Writing-intensive course)

GERM 100 (01) THE NEW FACE/S OF GERMANY: CONTEMP GERMAN SOCIETY IN FILM & TEXT Open 4 Cap 19

G. Davis   TuTh 11:00-12:15pm   Ciru 009

First-year seminar (Writing-intensive course)

PHIL 275 PHILOSOPHY AND FILM Open 19 Cap 25          

TTh 11:00-12:15pm & T 7-10pm (screening) Skinner 216

T. Wartenberg

SPAN 221 INTRO TO SPANISH & LATIN AMERICAN FILM Open 2 Cap 16

J. Crumbaugh   TuTh 11:00-12:15pm   Rees 324

FREN 225 INTRO to CONTEM CULTURE & MEDIA IN FRANCE Open 1 Cap 15

C. Rivers   MW 11:00-12:15pm   Ciru 225

GERM 311 (01) NOSTALGIA & UTOPIA: 19 th CENTURY GERMAN LIT & CULTURE I Open 96 Cap 100

G. Davis   TuTh 1:15-2:30pm   Ciru 009

RELIG 213 RELIGION & FILM Open 10 Cap 15

H. Atchley    MW 11:00-12:15pm and T 1:00-3:50pm (screening) Rees 307/Clap 225

 

 

SECTION 2: 5 COLLEGE COURSES with Course Descriptions

 

PART I: UMASS Production Courses:

 

ART 230 1 PHOTOGRAPHY I

30956 Section 1 8:00AM 10:45AM TuTh Bartlett 51 Cap: 14

30957 Section 2 1:25PM 4:10PM TuTh Bartlett 51

Staff

Pre Req: Art 110, 120& 131

Open to Undergraduate ART, BFA-ART, BFA-ART ED, and BFA-DESIGN majors only.

Introduction to photographic tools and methods. The balance between self-inquiry and the importance of process and materials as vehicles of meaning. Theory explored through class critiques and slide presentations. Photography examined and discussed both from a personal point of view and in its wider cultural context.

Course Component : Studio / Skills Pre Req: Art 110, 120& 131

ART 297Q ST-ANIMATION FDMTLS Cap18

38751 Benn,Janet A 9:30AM 12:30PM TuTh FineArtCtr 439

Warning: check details for notes and requisites or consent requirements!

 

ART 397R ST-PHOTO III

38502 1 3 Jahoda, Susan Eve W 13.25-16.10 BART 51 -

38755 L1 3 Jahoda, Susan Eve F 13.25-16.10 BART 53

It is through memory recognition, image repertoires, and experiences that we construct our worlds. This course will focus on developing perceptions of place, space, time, light, making/taking pictures, and identifying the content that is driving the work, but is missing from the work. Initially we will work on a series of exercises to bring us to a place of recognizing what is "absent" in our work, and what we would like to carry forward in our work that is "present". From that point you will be asked to submit a proposal outlining two projects that you will work on for the duration of the semester. The first will need to be completed by mid-term, and the second will be due at the end of the semester. Every other week you will be expected to show work in progress. It is required that you keep a journal, solely for the purpose of documenting the progression of your project. This should include both texts and images. The journal will be submitted at mid-term and at the end of the semester, along with your projects.

Prerequisites: Art 230 & 231

 

ART 397V ST-DIGITAL MEDIA: TIME BASED

39670 1 3 Jahoda, Susan Eve TTh 13.00-15.45

Open to ART, BFA-ART, and BFA-DESIGN majors only.

Requires intermediate level knowledge of Photoshop CS or consent of the instructor.

 

ART 497R ST-RESEARCH/COMP ART

31092 1 3 Galvis-Assmus, Patricia F 09.05-15.00 FAC 445

Warning: check details for notes and requisites or consent requirements!

 

ART 597Q 1 STS ST- ANIMATION FDMTLS Cap 2

38759 Benn,Janet A 9:30AM 12:30PM TuTh FineArtCtr 439

Warning: check details for notes and requisites or consent requirements!

 

ART 697B ADVANCED PHOTOGRAPHY

31116 1 3 Jahoda, Susan Eve F 13.25-16.10 BART 53

Warning: check details for notes and requisites or consent requirements!

 

ART 697J 1 STS ST-COMP ANIMATION I Cap 5

31098 Benn,Janet A 1:25PM 4:10PM MW FineArtCtr 447

Warning: check details for notes and requisites or consent requirements!

 

ART 697V ST-DIGITAL MEDIA: MOVING IMAGE Cap 6

39671 1 3 Jahoda, Susan Eve TTh 13.00-15.45

Artists have always used the technological tools of their times, often expanding the creative use of those tools. Digital Media: Time Based is a course that explores the creative possibilities of digital video and sound. We will consider from a technical, formal, contextual, and conceptual perspective composing, shooting and editing moving imagery. We will investigate the theme of time (duration, slowness, speed, rhythm) in

narrative linear formats with such applications as Final Cut Pro HD, QuickTime, Garage Band and DVD Studio Pro.

This course is about the expressive manipulation of captured video, not a course where you just learn the mechanics of time-based applications. Success with digital media does not come from expertise with the applications, but from the knowledge of the expansive scope that this medium occupies in the field of art. While skill is obtained through practice with the tool, ideas are explored through other sources.

Class time will involve a combination of technical instruction, lectures on pertinent issues within the context of the medium, screenings of contemporary video and film, work time for projects, and critiques of projects. Out of class time, in addition to projects, will involve independent research and reading.

Class investigations will include:

* Capturing imagery: using a digital video camera.

* Nonlinear editing process.

* Using the software, primarily Final Cut Pro HD, Photoshop CS, to

manipulate the captured video, methods of layering moving images.

* Incorporating still images into the video project.

* Preparing edited files for output: using primarily Cleaner 6 and DVD

Studio Pro 3, and building menus with navigation.

* Encoding: for streaming media files for the Internet, and to burn to DVD

 

 

ART 791C 1 SEM-GRADUATE COMP ARTS

31095 4:40PM 7:30PM TuTh FineArtCtr 448

Galvis-Assmus,Patricia

Open to Graduate Art majors only.

COMM 331 PROGRAM PROCESSES IN TV PRODUCTION

32067 W 1:25-2:15 (lecture)

Labs: 32068 M 1:25-4:25 or 32069 W 9:05-12:05 or 32070 F 9:05-12:05

Maxcy and staff Cap: 36 (12 x 3 sections)

Lecture, studio. Introduction to concepts and techniques of television production, through lectures, lab exercises, and guided production projects. All 3 sections will meet together once a week for a 50-minute lecture with the course director. Each section will then meet once a week for a 3-hour lab session. (Course capacity is 36)

Course Eligibility*: Senior, Junior & Sophomore COMM majors

 

COMM 393B: INTERMEDIATE VIDEO ART PRODUCTION

39605 10:10AM 1:00PM W Machmer E-30D Cap 10

39606 7:00PM 9:00PM Tu SouthCollg 108

Instructor TBA

Lecture, studio. This intermediate video production course combines the history and theories of video art and/or documentary filmmaking with pre-production, production, and post-production technical training. Through in-class critiques, screenings, readings, and discussion, students will explore the aesthetics and practice of the moving image while developing their own original projects. Enrollment by application only. For details and application forms, contact the UMASS Film Studies office, 129 Herter Annex, (413) 545-3659, film@hfa.umass.edu. Application deadline: 15 April 2005. (Course capacity is 10) Course Eligibility*: Permission of instructor--application is required. Students cannot add this course through SPIRE.

Course Prerequisite: Permission of instructor--application is required (see above).

 

COMM 397B: SPECIAL TOPIC-INTRODUCTION TO STUDIO DIRECTING

39608 11:15AM 3:15PM Tu Herter TV STUDIO Cap 10

Maxcy 120 South College

Lecture, studio. Students will learn basic concepts and techniques of studio television production, with a focus on directing live programs in a full-scale studio facility on the UMASS campus. The course includes lecture presentations, production exercises, script-writing projects, and studio production projects. Finally, each student will write, produce, and direct a live studio production. (Course capacity is 10)

Course Eligibility*: Senior, Junior & Sophomore COMM majors

Course Notes: If have taken COMM 433 you CANNOT take this course.

 

COMM 441 PRINCIPLES & TECHNIQUES OF FILM-STYLE PRODUCTION

32102 1:00PM 3:00PM TuTh SouthCollg 108

Geisler Cap 12

Lecture, studio. A hands-on introduction to single-camera filmmaking using digital video camcorders (electronic field production) or 16mm cameras and non-linear (computer-based) editing. Students will learn concepts of pre-production, shot composition, lighting, visual storytelling, continuity editing, and production & post production audio as they plan, shoot and edit exercises and complete projects. A "real world" editing project (scenes from an episode of "Highlander" will also be included. (Course capacity is 12)

Course Eligibility*: Senior & Junior COMM majors

Course Prerequisites: COMM 297D or COMM 331 or permission of instructor/application process.

Course Notes: Only COMM Juniors and Seniors who have completed either COMM 297D or COMM 331 may add this course through Spire. Others may add only by permission of the instructor. Students who do not meet the prerequisites for this class may fill out an application available from the instructor (Office: 411 Machmer).

 

COMM 493E (SECTION 1) SEM: SCREENWRITING

32103 11:15AM 12:30PM TuTh SouthCollg 108

Norden Cap 20

Lecture, discussion. An examination of the art, craft, and business of screenwriting from theoretical and practical perspectives. Topics included: the nature of screenplay formats and structures; creation and development of premise, plot, character, and action; scene writing; adaptation issues; place of the screenwriter in the collaborative process of filmmaking; and marketing strategies. The focus will be on scriptwriting for storytelling movies and, to a limited extent, TV programs. In-class activities will include exercises in visual thinking, scene analyses, and staged readings. Written work will include several screenwriting projects. (Course capacity is 20)

Course Eligibility*: Senior COMM majors

 

COMM 493E (SECTION 1) SEM: SCREENWRITING

38829 1:25PM 4:15PM W SouthCollg 108

Geisler Cap 20

Lecture, discussion. An examination of the art, craft, and business of screenwriting from theoretical and practical perspectives. Topics include screenplay format and structure, story, plot and character development, dialog and scene description, visual storytelling, pace and rhythm, analysis of professional and student scripts and films, and more. Written work includes three screenwriting projects. The focus is on writing for narrative films and, to a limited extent, TV programs. (Course capacity is 20)

Course Prerequisite: 3 hours in COMM film courses.

Course Eligibility*: Senior & Junior COMM majors

 

PART II: UMASS NON-PRODUCTION COURSES:

 

COMMUNICATION

COMM 240 MODES OF FILM

32168/ 38816 TuTh 4:00-5:15 (lecture), Tu 5:30- 7:30pm screening Thomp 102/106

Norden Cap: 125

Lecture, lab (screening). The nature and functions of film, including narrative and non-narrative approaches to film communication. Topics will include: the components of film expression (composition, movement, editing, sound, directing, and acting); designs in screen narrative; film's relationship to other arts and media; and its role as an instrument of social reflection and change. (Course capacity is 150)

Course Eligibility*: COMM or undeclared majors or students who have already taken COMM 118 or 121. NOTE: UMASS Film Certificate students who do not meet the above criteria, may come to the Film Studies office in 129 Herter Annex to enroll in this course.

 

COMM 297D ST: FILM & TV PRODUCTION CONCEPTS

32066 TuTh 4:00PM 5:15PM TuTh HasLabAdd 126

Geisler Cap:120

Lecture, discussion. This class provides an overview of film and television production principles and processes from script to screen and also prepares students for later hands-on production courses. We will explore both the art and craft of film and video production, including the roles and functions of the major creative and technical personnel in the scripting/ pre-production, production and post-production phases. Technical aspects such as digital vs. analog media, lighting, lenses, types of film and videotape, crew organization and function, editing concepts, sound recording, etc. will be discussed, as well as creative functions such as dramatic and documentary structure, creating characters, acting for the screen, visualization and composition for the camera and more. (Course capacity is 150)

Course Eligibility*: COMM or undeclared majors or students who have already taken COMM 118 or 121. NOTE: UMASS Film Certificate students who do not meet the above criteria, may come to the Film Studies office in 129 Herter Annex to enroll in this course.

Course Notes: Honors Colloquium available.

 

39598 COMM H01 01 SEM Honors Colloq COMM 297D Cap 10

Geisler,Bruce H.

12:20PM 1:10PM W Machmer 413

Warning: check details for notes and requisites or consent requirements!

 

COMM 340 HISTORY OF FILM I

32071 Tu 1:00-2:15 (lecture) Herter 227

32072 T 6:00-8:00 (screening), Herter 227

Disc: 32073 W 10:10-11:00; 32074 W 11:15-12:05; 32075 W 12:20-1:10;

32076 W 9:05-9:55; 38823 W8:00-8:50

Anderson Cap 125

Lecture, lab (screening), discussion. A survey of key events and representative films that mark the history of motion pictures in the United States and other countries to 1950. In addition to identifying and providing access to major works, the course is designed to facilitate the study of the various influences (industrial, technological, aesthetic, social, cultural, and political) that have shaped the evolution of the medium to the advent of television. (Course capacity is 125 Total/5 discussions @25)

Course Eligibility*: Seniors, Juniors & Sophomores

 

COMM 392C FILM AND SOCIETY IN ISRAEL (also JUDAIC 392C)

Gershenson T 5:30-8:00pm Cap 5

See JUDAIC 392C for course description.

 

COMM 493I ST: AMERICAN CINEMA IN 1960’S

38830 4:30PM 6:30PM MW SouthCollg 108

Anderson Cap 20

Lecture, discussion, lab. This course will explore the relationship between cinema and social life in America in the tumultuous era know as "the sixties" (roughly between 1963-1973). We will trace several themes (institutional authority, notions of sanity and power, gender politics, issues of war and peace, civil rights) across films of various genres made in that period and also look at recent films (both narrative and documentary) set in the sixties to consider the politics of historical representation. Individual research projects; class reports; take-home exams. (Course capacity is 20)

Course Prerequisite: COMM 342 or permission of the instructor.

Course Eligibility*: Senior & Junior COMM majors

 

COMM 497KK ST-FAMILY FILM AND CULTURE Cap 25

40250 4:00PM 7:00PM Th SouthCollg 108

Haynes

This course will address questions of representations of family in films. Students will examine the construction of family as an institution under particular cultural conditions and the influence of film in maintaining traditional families as an ideal form. We will also examine alternative representations of family and changing structures and roles within family.

 

COMM 597G ST: FILM & FACISM: PROPOGANDA, RESISTANCE, MEMORY

39610 TuTh1:00-2:15 (lecture) Herter 217 Tues/Herter 227 Thurs

39611 Th 6:00-10:00 (screening) Herter 227

Byg Cap: 30 (crosslisted as GERMAN 597C and COMLIT 597D)

See GERMAN 597C for course description.

Note: Advanced undergraduate students may take this course with permission from the instructor.

 

COMLIT 381 SELF-REFLEXIVE AVANT GARDE FILM

38837 3:35PM 7:00PM M (lecture) Herter 231 Cap 120

Disc: 38838 T 2:30-3:45, 38839 T 2:30-3:45, 38840 T 4:00-5:15, 38841 T 7:00-8:15pm Cap 30 x 4 sections

Levine

Lecture, discussion. Explores modern origin of film experimentation in avant-garde modes such as Expressionism, Surrealism and contemporary results of this heritage. Trying to determine if film is the most resolutely modern of the media, we'll look at cinema as the result of two obsessive concerns: 1) the poetic, dreamlike and fantastic, 2) the factual, realistic and socially critical or anarchistic. Thus, we'll attempt to discover how modern culture deals with avant-garde imperatives to always "make it new". Films and filmakers such as Breathless (Godard), Lang, My Own Private Idaho, The American Soldier ( Fassbinder), others. Requirements: one 5 page paper for midterm, ten page final paper or project; attendance.

 

COMLIT 381H SELF-REFLEXIVE AVANT GARDE FILM

39629 3:35PM 7:00PM M Herter 231

Disc: 39630 2:30PM 4:30PM Tu TBA Cap 4

Levine

We apply ourselves to the problem of vision as an acquired skill, learning to distinguish the ways Hollywood normative cinema has constructed a visual language which we accept, uncritically, as how reality appears on the screen. This language is examined - how what it presents differs from what we see with the “naked” eye and how it, in turn, forms what we see, (what we can see, what we look for) in the world. Various types of avant-garde film are examined so that we come, to imagine how it might be otherwise (films by directors such as Dreyer, Lang, Man Ray, Bunuel, Vertov, Godard, Fassbinder, Egoyan, Van Sant). Students attend a lecture and film screening (once a week) and the next day, an intensive seminar-style section of 2-3 hours. Here we present and discuss new material, some from readings, and, occasionally, screenings of additional films and film clips. The course is incremental and there is thus an absolute attendance requirement. There will be a take-home mid-term essay (5 pages) and final essay (10 pages), a two--page scene analysis, and an approved self-directed project. This course differs from ComLit 381 in the length of the section (2-3 hours per week instead of 75 minutes), extra work-load and additional readings. Recommended only for students (at all levels) who have a keen interest in film. There is a required hands-on filmmaking colloquium for one extra credit - a total of 5 credits.

 

COMLIT 385 RUSSIAN THEMES IN WORLD CINEMA

32591 7:00PM 10:00PM M Herter 231 Cap 25

38842 2:30PM 3:45PM Tu TBA Cap 25

Dienes

Lecture. Introduction to Russian cinema, focusing on selected contemporary themes (violence, youth culture, race and gender issues), and on Western film inspired by Russian literary works, comparing Russian and Western approaches. Prerequisites: none.

 

COMLIT 391B FRENCH FILM (also FRENCH 350)

32513 3:30PM 6:00PM M Herter 227 Cap 48

Disc: 32565 T 9:30-10:45, 32666 T11:15-12:30, 32567 T 1:00-2:15, 32568 T 2:30-3:45 Cap 12 x 4 sections

Portuges

Lectures; film and video screenings; discussions.

Concentrates on the development of French films from the 1930s and its relations to French culture and society. Focuses on the art of French film, close reading of specific films, the ideology of different film practices, and relevant aspects of film theory, including questions of social, political and gender representation. Screenings of films and video tapes by directors such as Vigo, Carne, Renior, Bresson, Resnais, Godard, Truffaut, Rohmer, Ackerman, Kurys, and Tavernier. The films are in French with English subtitles. The language of instruction is English.Requirements: regular attendance at lectures, screenings, discussions groups; one short and one medium length paper; one midterm

 

COMLIT 397C ASIAN AMERICAN CINEMA -- CANCELLED Aug 05

Lec. Monday 11:15-1:45

Dis. 1 – F 10:10-11:00

Dis. 2 – F 11:15-12:05

Balce

The course is a survey of Asian American documentaries, narrative films, and experimental shorts. By “Asian American film and video,” we refer to films by and/or about Asian Americans including those who are immigrants, American-born, the exiles, the refugees and the undocumented. The course examines the past three decades of Asian American film and video, ranging from documentaries about Asian American histories, narrative shorts and experimental movies that explore issues of identity (national, racial, gendered, and sexual identities, among others), to feature-length independent films. For each week, we will study a critical film concept or genre and discuss Asian American cultural politics and history.

exam. Texts: Film Art: An Introduction. Prerequisites: any introductory course in analysis of film or its equivalent through practiced viewing and a serious interest in twentieth-century cultural life.

 

COMLIT 499D CAPSTONE COURSE: SELF-REFLEXIVE AVANT GARDE*

*Eligibility; Junior And Senior Honors Students Only

Lec. M 3:35-7:00

Tu 2:30-4:30, Th 2:30-4:30

This 6-credit Capstone Course fulfills the Commonwealth college culminating- experience requirement. We apply ourselves to the problem of cinematic vision as both process and acquired skill. We learn to distinguish the ways in which Hollywood normative cinema has constructed a visual language which we accept, uncritically, as the look reality has when screened. In turn, this "look" is examined to see how it differs from what we may see with the “naked” eye, and how it informs what we, see (what we can see, what we look for) in the world. Recommended for students who have a keen interest in film. Students attend a large lecture and film screening (once a week), an intensive seminar-style section of 2-3 hours the next day, on Thursday a film-making component for 3 hours. There will be a take-home mid-term essay (six pages) and final essay (ten pages), a two page scene analysis, and an intensive final film project (20 minutes). Students investigate aspects of film-making (such as shot formation, camera movement, editing approaches) by collaboratively exploring a range of expressive -possibilities on video. Working in groups of three or four, students start off the semester alternating roles of writer/director, camera -person, editor, etc., in constructing brief scenes. No prior film experience necessary. This 6 credit course may qualify students for high Latin Honors, if they have fulfilled other specific requirements. See a Commonwealth College advisor for more information. Preference in registration given to seniors using this course toward their culminating experience requirement, others as space permits. Contact Commonwealth College 504 Goodell to register.

 

COMPLIT 597D ST-FILM AND FASCISM* (also COMM597G, GERMAN597C)

* Qualified undergrads register with permission of instructor.

39481 1:00PM - 2:15PM TuTh TBA (lecture) Herter 217 Tu & Herter 227 Th Cap 30

39482 6:00PM - 10:00PM Th Herter 227 (screening)

Byg

See course description for GERMAN 597C

 

COMLIT 497F INTL FILM NOIR (* also COMLIT 695A)

38846 W 2:30-6:30 Tobin 304 Cap 15

Levine

Often referred to as the only indigenous American film style, "film noir" in its very appellation reveals that its major effects (for certain modern conceptions of cinema) lay elsewhere. We will examine film noir in its American heyday (1945-1957) and how it came to be a major propelling force in the new European cinema of the 1960's (Godard, and the Cahiers du cinema). How film noir displaces American social mores and their constitution of "reality" within the imaginary and symbolic fields, and within the symptomatic concretization of those fields that is normative (dominant) cinema. How film noir both makes film different and allows already latent difference to be manifested. How film noir takes shape in the U.S. as expression of the inexpressible (and the ‘unheimlich”) or, at least, of the allusion to it; which in the lens and on the screen of directors such as Godard and Fassbinder becomes pseudomorphic, presenting a critique of American imperialism both public (political) and private (psychic) – the American way of death and love (or, as the title of one work would have it, Love & Napalm: Export USA). Films by: American directors such as Aldritch, Ray, Fuller, Kubrick, Welles; Foreign agents such as Lang, Ophuls, Siodmak, Sirk, Von Sternberg; European directors such as Godard, Fassbinder, Wenders. Prerequisite: 2 prior film courses or permission of

Instructor.

 

FRENCH 350 FRENCH FILM

34125 M3:30-6:00 Herter 227 (lecture/screening) Cap 72

Disc 34126 T 9:30-10:45, 34127 T 11:15-12:30, 34128 T 1:00-2:15, 34129 T 2:30-3:45

Disc cap 18 x 4 sections

Portuges

See COMLIT 391B course description.

 

GERMAN 597C ST: FILM & FASCISM: Propaganda, Resistance, Memory

39083 TuTh 1:00-2:15 lecture Herter217 Tu & Herter227 Th Cap 30

39084 Th 6:00-10:00pm screening Herter 227 Cap 20

Barton Byg byg@german.umass.edu (also listed as COMM597G/COMLIT 597D)

The course will treat the image of Nazism in the cinema and a variety of ways to deal with the challenge such images pose. The Nazis used mass media to turn politics and even war into a form of aesthetic spectacle. This process has persisted even after World War II, and this course will analyze the images the Nazis created for themselves and the forms in which these images have persisted in post-war popular culture. The course will place even greater emphasis on films that resisted Nazism, both in aesthetic form and in content, and on films that attempt to preserve the memory of the victims of the Nazis---predominantly the Jews of Europe, but also other ethnic minorities, foreign nationalities, gays and lesbians and the organized political left. Readings include: Insdorf, Sontag, Friedlaender, Kaes, Rentschler, Schulte-Sasse, Witte, etc. Films discussed: (sample list)

Shoah, Night and Fog, Cabaret, The Great Dictator, To Be or Not to Be, Harold and Maude, The Seventh Cross, Hangmen Also Die, Image Before My Eyes, The Partisans of Vilna, Girls in Uniform, Our Corpses are Still Alive, Satan’s Brew, Germany Pale Mother, Holocaust, Heimat, Stars, The Man in the Glass Booth, The Blue Angel, Jew Suess, Triumph of the Will, Hitler--A Film from Germany, Not Reconciled, Stalag 17, It's All for You, Intervals of Silence -- On Being Jewish in Germany, In the Country of

My Parents, Malou, Naked Among Wolves, Jacob the Liar, Scorpio Rising, Gimme Shelter, The Shop on Main Street, The Night Porter, The Eternal Jew, Schindler’s List, and The Downfall.

NB: Graduate Course; Advanced undergraduates by permission only

 

ITALIAN 350 ITALIAN AMERICAN FILM: Everyday Violence

39139 6:00PM 9:00PM Tu Room: TBA Cap 50

Stone,Jennifer A.

Course taught in English. Cross-listed as JUDAIC 497D.

Studies films by Italian American directors influenced by Italian neorealism and other European traditions. Also charts accomplishments of Italian American actors. Principal directors from East Coast School (Scorsese, De Niro, Ferrara and Savoca plus Buscemi, Turturro, and Mottola); and from Europe and beyond (Wenders, Scott, and Bennett). Contrasted with Hollywood code (Coppola, Leone, and Tarantino). Related films by Allen, Ramis, Scorsese, Levinson and Chase. Problem of "psychopathology of everyday violence" ©2005jastonephd from a Freudian psychoanalytic perspective in terms of paranoia, psychosis or healthy sublimation. Questions of genre (Western mythology) and neo-noir urban anomie; and European immigration and identity. Warshow's classic critical writings. See javari.com/booklists.htm

 

ITALIAN 490B NOVEL INTO FILM :Screen Memories

39141 2:30PM 5:30PM Tu Cap 50

Stone,Jennifer A.

Course taught in English. Cross-listed as JUDAIC 491B

The screenplay is a structure which wants to be another structure

—Pier Paolo Pasolini

Pasolini's definition of a relationship between screenplay and director's cut applies to novel into scenario, shooting script, and film (and reverse, film into novel). We deconstruct "adaptation" through theories of "translation" or "transference" after Freud (Interpretation of Dreams and "Screen Memories"), Benjamin ("The task of the translator"), Bloom, Calvino, Chion, Derrida, and Sontag; Screenwriters: Adair, Cecchi d'Amico, and Schiffman). Contrast European and Hollywood cinema methods and structures. Questions of origin, originality, ambivalence, and sublimation; focal lens work for architecture, space, panoramic distance, and close-up; function of auditory sphere (dialogue, soundtrack, music, offscreen and voice over). Freud's theory of "screen memory" [Deckererinnerung] for process of reading/transcription with intervening "cover" memory as mechanism of defence.

Screenwriting/videomaking option. See javari.com/booklists.htm

 

JUDIAC STUDIES 392C: FILM AND SOCIETY IN ISRAEL (also COMM392C)

39183 T 5:30-8:00pm Cap 15

Gershenson

Lecture, discussion & screening. This course uses cinema to introduce students to an array of issues that define Israel, such as foundation of Israel, Israeli-Palestinian conflict, as well as ethnic, religious, and gender identities. Discussion includes a brief survey of Israeli history and film-making. All film screenings are with English subtitles. (Course capacity is 15)

Course Notes: You must enroll in Judaic Studies 392C through Judaic Studies on SPIRE.

 

MUSIC 170H 1 MUSIC IN FILM*

*Only open to Commonwealth College Options Learning Community freshmen.

39714 LEC 1:00PM 2:15PM TuTh Cap 25

Rideout, Roger GenEd & Diversity Requirements: Arts

The use of music in film, a "grand tour" of the aesthetics and dramatic techniques of film music since 1895. Excerpts from "silent era" and sound films will be viewed and studied as examples of film music development and the composer's art. (Gen.Ed. AT)

 

THEATER 397D 1 ST-PLAYS TO MOVIES: COSTUME INTERPRETATION 39341 2:30PM 3:45PM TuTh FineArtCtr 201 Cap 25

Warner, Patricia C

This course will explore the role of costume design in a series of movies that have been made from plays, from the 1900s to the 1990s. Students will learn how critical the costuming is in placing the movie in its own time frame, and in interpreting the play's period. Students will be required to read the original plays, watch the subsequent movie(s) and write papers on the actualizations from word to film as they relate to costume.

THEATER 499C HNRS CAPSTONE: WRITING FOR STAGE & SCREEN

39348 9:00AM 11:00AM TuTh FineArtCtr 112 4 credits Cap 12

Olf, Julian M

Part of a two-semester writing course. During the first semester, students will study narration for stage and screen, and will undertake a series of writing projects aimed at developing story-telling skills. During the second semester, each student will write an original one-act play or short screenplay. All students who register for THEATER 499C in the fall are expected to take the continuation course in the spring (THEATER 499D).

Note: Students who are not members of the Commonwealth College must obtain consent of the instructor to register for this Capstone course.

 

UMASS Film-COMPONENT COURSES:

Note: These courses do NOT count toward the UMASS film certificate!

 

COMLIT 291R RUSSIAN CULTURE *Component course only!

32592 7:00PM 10:00PM Tu (lecture/screening) Herter 231 Cap 50

Disc: 39408 D1 7:00PM 7:50PM Th Cap 25

39409 D2 8:05PM 8:55PM Th Cap 25

Dienes

General introduction to Russian culture before the 20th century. Although the course will emphasize the arts (architecture, literature, music, dance, painting, especially in the 19th century), it will also examine the historical roots of modern Russian habits and ways of thinking by paying attention to history, social ideas, the governmental system, religious traditions, etc. (A companion course, Russian 251: Modern Russian Culture, usually offered in the spring, deals with the 20th century.) A significant portion of the course will use resources on the Web; students will be expected to do some of the coursework electronically. Numerous films, video presentations, possibly visiting lecturers. Prerequisites: a current valid OIT computer account; no knowledge of Russian required. An Honors colloquium may be offered to interested students.

 

 

AMHERST:

 

PART I: AMHERST COLLEGE PRODUCTION COURSES:

None in Fall 2005.

 

PART II: AMHERST COLLEGE NON-PRODUCTION COURSES:

 

ENGLISH 01-05 RESPONDING TO FILM

Professor Cameron

MW 12:30-1:50 Limited to 20 students.

Like poems, plays and novels, films invite a response from their viewer that is at once one of pleasure and one of attentive analysis and nuanced judgment. This course will pay attention to a number of individual films, from past and present, from this country and elsewhere, that invite and deserve such responses. A strong emphasis in the course will be upon encouraging and disciplining the efforts of students to find language for themselves that is adequate to what they see and hear in films and upon helping them use that language to see and hear ever more in the films they watch. Frequent short writing assignments and at least one screening per week.

ENGLISH 20 INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF FILM

Professor Duerfahrd

TTh 11:30-12:50 Limited to 20 students.

This is an introductory class for students who are seeking to familiarize themselves with the history of cinema from the silent era to the present, its periods, genres, styles and directors. It is an opportunity for beginning students to learn how to observe, describe, and think critically about film, and how to raise questions about scene, shot, frame, camera movement, and editing style in order to understand the effects (historical and personal) that each film renders. Some theoretical texts will help us explore the ways in which these aspects of the medium have been addressed.

 

ENGLISH 24 SCREENWRITING

Visiting Lecturer Johnson.

TTh 11:30-12:50

This course is a first workshop in narrative screenplay writing. The "screenplay" is a unique and ephemeral form that exists as a blueprint for something else-a finished film. How do you convey this audio-visual medium (movies) on the page? In order to do that, the screenwriter must have some sense of what the "language of film" is, as well as some sense of what kinds of stories movies-as opposed to novels, plays, or short stories-tell well. This course will try to analyze both the language of film and the shape of film stories, as a means toward teaching the craft of screenwriting. Frequent exercises, readings, and screenings.

This course is limited in enrollment. Preregistration is not allowed. Please consult the Creative Writing Center website for information on admission to this course.

 

ENGLISH 75-02 FILM NOIR

Professor Duerfahrd

TTh 2-3:20 Open to juniors and seniors. Limited to 15 students.

This seminar will examine the intense period of film production and film stylization in America between 1942-1959 known as the period of Film Noir. There will be some survey of the literary and sociological background to Noir, but emphasis will be placed on a reading of the films. The innovation in cinematic language, the creation of a specific mood and situations of moral complexity, the ambiguity of the hero and the birth of the femme fatale: these are some of the themes that we will consider in determining how these films function both as documents of post-war American culture and as critiques of that culture. Wider questions will be raised about the difference between the art film and the “B” film, the official death of Film Noir and the rise of Neo-Noir, European Noir, Noir on TV. The development of the genre will be studied through works by Wilder, Lewis, Welles, Huston, Fuller, Aldrich, Coppola. Readings will include essays by the French film critics who gave the style its name, works of film criticism, and essays on lighting by a cinematographer of the period.

ENGLISH 83 THE NON-FICTION FILM

Senior Lecturer von Schmidt

TTh 10-11:20 Limited to 25 students.

The study of a range of non-fiction films, including (but not limited to) the “documentary,” ethnographic film, autobiographical film, the film essay. Will include the work of Eisenstein, Vertov, Ivens, Franju, Ophüls, Leacock, Kopple, Gardner, Herzog, Chopra, Citron, Wiseman, Blank, Apted, Marker, Morris, Joslin, Riggs, McElwee. Two film programs weekly. Readings will focus on issues of representation, of “truth” in documentary, and the ethical issues raised by the films.

 

THEATER & DANCE 62 PERFORMANCE STUDIO

Professor Woodson

time: TBA

An advanced course in the techniques of creating performance. Each student will create and rehearse a performance piece that develops and incorporates original choreography, text, music, sound and/or video. Experimental and collaborative structures and approaches among and within different media will be stressed. The final performance pieces and events will be presented in the Holden Theater. Can be taken more than once for credit. Requisite: Theater & Dance 35 and consent of the instructor. See Theater & Dance 29.

AmherstCollege Production courses Fall 2005: none

 

HAMPSHIRE:

FILM/PHOTO/VIDEO production:

 

HACU 109 INTRO. TO MEDIA PRODUCTION: IMAGES OF WAR

Kara Lynch Open Cap:16 T-Th 10:30-11:50 FPH or ASH

This course will introduce students to interdisciplinary work in media production. Students in this class will be active readers, lookers, thinkers, and makers. Whether through first-hand oral accounts, painting, photography, film, video or live web-streaming, war is imaged for our consumption and contemplation. This class will consider the relationship between images and military proliferation within daily life. We will look at how images function in both pro and anti-war debates and how they are crucial to our understanding of death and violence when associated with war. We will concentrate on modern warfare and the camera’s framing of these engagements. This class will introduce students to critical skills that will enable them to describe, interpret and evaluate the ways in which images represent the world around us. At the same time, video, photo and digital production workshops will introduce students to a range of production skills. Response, research, reflection and revision are key concepts within the structure of this class. Weekly reading and looking assignments will provoke written and visual responses. Students will participate in group work and dynamic class discussions. This class will prepare students for continued work in media and cultural studies, media production and the social sciences. There is a lab fee charged for the course.

EXP, PRS,REA,WRI

 

HACU 118 MAPPING TIME: HIST & PRAC OF FILM/VIDEO INSTALLATION

TBA Open Cap:16 W 9-11:50 PFB classroom

In this course we will investigate the multiple histories, strategies, and concepts around film and video installation. Perceptions of time and space function differently in the museum than in the theatrical setting. Installation uses space as an integral part of creating meaning. In this course we will look at film, video, and media works that use, sound, site-specificity, multiple channels, loops, and absences as tools for communicating ideas. The presentation of motion pictures in a non-theatrical setting dates back to the early days of cinema. We will look at histories of projection performance, multi-channel video works, and installations from the days of magic lantern slides, through Dada, Fluxus, and Happenings to contemporary installation practice. Students will be expected to read from a variety of historical, theoretical, literary, and art historical texts, write papers, and give in-class presentations on historical and contemporary installation artists. EXP, PRS, REA, WRI

 

HACU 133T THE PHOTOGRAPHIC PORTRAIT

Sandra Matthews Tutorial Cap:12 T-Th 9-10:20 FPH 107

Growing out of the traditions of drawn, painted, and sculpted portraits, photographic portraits have become embedded in contemporary life, and serve multiple purposes. In this seminar we will examine portraits made throughout the history of photography in several cultures, looking at individual and group portraits, formal and informal portraits, portraits made for specific purposes, and self-portraits. We will analyze them as cultural artifacts, always keeping historical context in mind. We will read widely, view an astonishing range of pictures, and take several field trips. Students will keep a reading journal and complete a visual project, several short papers, and a longer research paper. There is no darkroom access associated with this course. MCP, PRJ, PRS, REA, WRI

 

HACU 209 VIDEO I

Joan Braderman Prereq Cap:16 T 12:30-3:20 Library B6

Video I is an introductory video production course. Over the course of the semester students will gain experience in pre- production, production, and post-production techniques as well as learn to think and look critically about the making of the moving image. Projects are designed to develop basic technical proficiency in the video medium as well as the necessary working skills and mental discipline so important to a successful working process. Final production projects will experiment with established media genres. In-class critiques and discussion will focus on media analysis and image/sound relationships. There is a lab fee charged for the course. Prerequisite: 100 level course in media arts (Introduction to Media Arts, Introduction to Media Production, Introduction to Digital Photography & New Media, or equivalent)

 

HACU 210 FILM I: SIXTEEN, SILENT, SPLICING, SOUND

TBA Prereq Cap: 16 Th 9-11:50 & T 6:30-9:30 (screening) PFB Classroom

The course begins with an intensive introduction to 16mm filmmaking and the wonders of cameras, lenses, projectors, and editing. In the “silent” section, we proceed to a study of the silent film genre, viewing historical and contemporary works by filmmakers from the Lumiere brothers to Andy Warhol, from those who worked with silence and piano accompaniment, to those who deliberately choose not to add any sound to their work. “Splicing” will investigate editing as a primary locus for the creation of meaning in film. We will examine concepts and practices of cutting film and make our own forays into traditional and experimental editing. The "sound" section of the course will examine audio as a technical aspect of filmmaking, as well as an aesthetic world with a life of its own. Students will be expected to challenge their expectations of what film is and what film can be. There will be numerous readings and assignments, all of which you are expected to complete with delight and enthusiasm. There are several production assignments, in small groups and pairs. Additional screenings and workshops are held on Tuesday evenings. Final projects entail the creation of one or more films of your own devising. A $50 lab fee is required for this course.

 

HACU 211 STILL PHOTOGRAPHY I:DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY

Jacqueline Hayden Prereq Cap:16 T 9-11:50 PFB Classroom

This course explores the intersections of digital and traditional photographic imaging in terms of technique, critical theory, history and aesthetics. Three objectives will be emphasized: first the acquisition of basic photographic skills including composition exposure processing and printing in digital format (both b & w and color, production and post production techniques with Adobe Photoshop); second, familiarity with historical and contemporary movements in photography and the development of visual literacy; and third to begin the process of realizing each individuals creative goals the students will be directed to work in a variety of photographic forms. Projects are designed to develop basic technical proficiency in the photographic medium as well as the necessary working skills and mental discipline so important to a successful working process. Students will have weekly shooting and printing assignments and in addition will complete a portfolio by the end of the semester. Technical workshops will meet once a week for two hours (outside of class time). A lab fee of $50 entitles the students access to digital laboratory and special equipment and materials. Students must provide their own paper. It is expected you will have your own digital camera, although you may take cameras out from the Film/Photo/Video equipment room. Prerequisite: 100 level course in Media Arts (Introduction to Media Arts (photo, film or video), Intro to Digital Photography & New Media or its equivalent).

 

????ARTST 200 STILL PHOTOGRAPHY I (MT HOLYOKE)

Stewart Prereq Cap:16 Th 2:30-5:20 PFB Classroom

 

HACU 253 MEDIA PRODUCTION II:THE NARRATIVE

Kara Lynch Prereq Cap: 16 W6:30-9:20 Library Studio

This course is an intermediate level production class that concentrates on narrative media production. This course will interrogate this form and expand the definition while introducing students to techniques and strategies for getting their projects from pitch to final cut. Requirements for this class include: attendance, participation in discussions and in-class critiques, outside theoretical readings and film/video screenings, weekly journal entries, production assignments, in-class workshops and a written treatment, script and budget for their final projects. Students will work in crews to complete 2-4 final narrative projects. Through these projects, students will become familiar with three major stages of media production: pre-production (research and development of an idea, planning & scheduling), production (shooting, recording, execution) and post-production (editing and revision); they will also acquire cursory knowledge of distribution. Supplementary workshops will concentrate on skills necessary for work in digital, film/video and audio production, including: lighting, field + studio recording, and editing. The goal of the course is for students to produce narrative work from start to finish with a group and practice their skills as producers and directors, writers, thinkers and artists. There is a lab fee charged for the course. prerequisites include: intro to media production or equivalent, Video/Film I or equivalent, one media studies/theory class, and one related course in the humanities, arts or social sciences.

 

HACU 254 STILL PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOP II: COLOR & MEDIUM FORMAT

Kane Stewart Instructor perm Cap: 16 M 2:30-5:20 PFB Classroom

This class is a forum in which students can develop their creative vision in photography through the acquisition of skills with larger format cameras, color and digital technologies. Knowledge of the aesthetic and social context of photographic practice will be emphasized. Students can expect bi-weekly to monthly assignments, reading relevant texts in the history and theory of photography and digital imaging and writing short papers. Additionally, this course will be enhanced through attending visiting artist lectures and exhibitions as well as film and video screenings. The lab fee of $50 entitles the student to darkroom facilities, lab supplies, and chemicals. Students must supply their own film and paper. Extensive additional lab time will be available. Technical workshops will meet once a week for two hours. Instructor Permission. Prior photographic experience is required.

 

HACU 255 FILM II: ARCHITECTONICS OF BODY & URBAN SPACE: FILM/INSTALL/PERFORMANCE

Brand & Hillman Inst.Perm Cap: 20 T 12:30-3:20 & T 7-9 (screening) PFB Classrm

“Bodies are like cities, their temporal coordinates transformed into spatial ones…”

- Celeste Olalquiaga

“One’s body takes root in the asphalt.”

- Siegfried Kracauer

This is an advanced interdisciplinary film production and theory class that explores movement, image, text and space in the context of relationships between the body in motion and the visual kinetics and social organization of urban space. Students will complete individual and group projects based on experimentation with a range of aesthetic, conceptual and experiential possibilities in installation, performance and film. The class will explore relationships between biological and architectural bodies and will consider a range of performative and cinematic representations of the city as a utopian or dystopic space. The class will study installations and films by Gerhard Richter, Pipilotti Rist, Marguerite Duras, Chantal Akerman, and Peter Greenaway and readings from Guy Debord, Celeste Olalquiaga, Walter Benjamin and the Critical Art Ensemble. A $50 lab fee entitles students to use camera and recording equipment, transfer and editing facilities, plus video and computer production and post-production equipment. Students must purchase their own film and animation supplies and pay their own processing fees. Required screenings and workshops sometimes occur in the evening. Registration is by instructor permission.

 

HACU 262 VIDEO II: MAKING MEDIA FOR DEMOCRACY

Joan Braderman Prereq Cap: 16 W 2:30-5:20 Library B6B

In the current election cycle, corporate consolidation and ties to the White House have intensified the usual myopia of the “mass” media in the US. But a range of new and independent news and culture jamming strategies are emerging rapid-fire to crack open the media landscape. In addition to video and text websites, there are a skyrocketing number of streaming sites, experiments with low power radio, progressive entrepreneurs buying up satellite space, bandwidth space, independents crashing the gates of box offices and dreaming up ways to grow a huge underground of information and culture that the current regime does not want you to see. Though CNN, Fox, et al, are still where most Americans learn what they know, independent media-makers act on the belief that there can be no democracy without a wide range of sources of culture and news to educate and inspire real citizenship. In this workshop, we will look at historical and current strategies for democratizing the media and creating and effectively distributing sounds, images and words that are inaccessible in the dominant media. These range from the Situationists in Paris in the 60’s to indymedia.com and the Hip Hop Convention today. As we examine experiments with media monopoly busting, students will work individually and in groups to plan, design and produce their own strategic media interventions – which will include video, TV, film, digital media, writing, photography, drawing, postering, installation, theater, music, radio and whatever else students invent. Substantive experience in at least two of these areas and completed coursework in at least one, are pre-requisites for this course.

 

HACU 299 DIVISION II INDEP PROJECTS IN FILM/PHOTO/VIDEO

Jacqueline Hayden Inst. Perm Cap: 16 W 3:30-6:30 PFB Class

This course will provide an opportunity to Division II students who wish to pursue their own work, creating at least one completed new work for inclusion in the Division II portfolio. We will enter each work where it is at the beginning of the course, whether in pre-production, production or post. Each student will be required to present his/her work to the group several times during the semester for critique and discussion. The group will provide critical, technical and crew support for one another. Team projects are fine as long as each participant has a distinct and responsible role in the making of the work. Technical workshops will be offered where necessary, although students must have some level of mastery over his/her form of expression before joining the course -- and college level course work and evaluations in that area.

We will unpack the conceptual process of creating and realizing new works. Readings, screenings and museum/gallery visits which address the specific problems faced by class members in developing the works-in-progress will be added as we go. All of these activities including active verbal contributions to all sessions are required of each student under the guiding principle that tracking each others’ intellectual and creative process will help them refine their own. A lab fee of $50. covers the use of Hampshire equipment and technical staff (although only one lab fee per semester is expected of each student whether participating in one or more courses.) For those interested in “re-radicalizing” the Hampshire curriculum, this new course provides a structured context in which to do independent work at the Division II level. Prerequisites: good mastery of form in which you will work and evaluations from several courses in the area.

 

HACU 310 ADVANCED TOPICS IN FILM/PHOTOGRAPHY/VIDEO

Bill Brand Inst. Perm Cap: 16 W 6:30-9:30 PFB Class

This course is open to film, photography, and video concentrators in their final semester of the Division III. First semester Division III students may also enroll if room permits and by consent of the instructor. The class will integrate the procedural and formal concentration requirements of the College with the creative work produced by each student. It will offer a forum for meaningful criticism, exchange, and exposure to each other. In addition, written assignments and a variety of readings by artists and others will be given that are intended to relate to the development and enunciation of each student's formal and contextual concerns as they are expressed in their Division III projects. There will be a $50 lab fee. Enrollment is limited to Division III concentrators; contracts must have been filed prior to enrollment. Registration is by instructor permission.

 

HACU 336 THE COLLECTOR: THEORY & PRACTICE

Robert Seydel and Sura Levine Prereq Cap: 35 W 1:00-3:30 PFB Class

The collector has become a primary figure or type in the world of contemporary art, and much of the most advanced work of the modern and postmodern periods can be tied to a collecting mentality. The early Wunderkammern of the sixteenth century and Dutch oil painting of the century following forms the prelude to our own century of collection mania and mad taxonomies. From Marcel Duchamp’s Box in a Valise and Joseph Cornell’s voluminous files to Claus Oldenburg’s Mouse Museum and Daniel Spoerri’s An Anecdoted Topography of Chance, from Joseph Beuys’s and Christian Boltanski’s installations to Marcel Broodthaer’s Museum of Modern Art, artists have employed the mentality of the collector in a variety of ways and to a variety of ends. In our examination of these and other works by contemporary artists we will research the mentality of the collector and attempt to understand its resonance for the modernist and postmodernist periods. The course is designed to emphasize photo-and-other-installation based work, but is simultaneously open to students from any concentration, including art history and writing. For students making use of the photography facilities, a $50 lab fee is charged for this course.

 

PART II: Hampshire College Non-Production Courses:

 

PART III: * Film Component or Film-Related Courses: [please check course restrictions for Film Studies program(s) at your home campus]

 

*HACU 266 DADA AND SURREALIST VISIONS

*Film-Component course only

Sura Levine & Eva Rueschmann M 2:30-5:20 & F 2-5:30 (screening)

In this course, we will explore Dada and Surrealism as twentieth-century international movements in the visual arts, architecture, performance, and film. We will place the emergence of Dada and Surrealism in their modernist European contexts and discuss major artists, writers, and filmmakers of the 1910s-1930s, including Hans Arp, Marcel Duchamp, Hannah Höch, George Grosz, and Louise Bourgeois, as well as Rene Clair, Luis Buñuel, Man Ray, Jean Cocteau and Germaine Dulac in cinema. From Dada's anarchic politics and word/image play to Surrealism's use of Freudian psychoanalysis and experiments with automatism, chance, and dream language, we will study the key aesthetic and cultural features of selected images and texts. The course concludes with the influence of Dada and Surrealist aesthetics and politics on contemporary art, evaluating their potential as powerful modes of critique and aesthetic response to a world gone awry. Assignments will include critical reading, reports, papers and events.

 

 

MOUNT HOLYOKE :

 

Part I: Mount Holyoke College Production Courses :

 

FS 210 PRODUCTION WORKSHOP /MOVING IMAGE

Wed 7-9pm (screening) & Thurs 9-12

Instructor TBA

This course offers an introductory exploration into the moving image as an art form outside of the conventions of the film and television industries. This class will cover technical and aesthetic aspects of video production and will also offer a theoretical and historical context in which to think about independent cinema and video art.

Satisfies Humanities I-A requirement; 1 meeting (3 hours), 1 screening (3 hours); a lab fee may be charged; 4 credits ; enrollment limited to 12

 

Part II: Mount Holyoke College Non-Production Courses:

 

FILMST 201 INTRODUCTION TO FILM

MW 8:35-9:50am & T 7:00-9:00pm (screening) ART 220

R. Blaetz

This course teaches the basic concepts and critical skills involved in interpreting film. Through lecture, reading, discussion, and screening of films both in and outside of class, the student will become a more informed and sophisticated observer of the cinema. During the first half of the semester, the class will study form and style in narrative film as well as in nonnarrative practices such as avant-garde and documentary filmmaking. For the remainder of the course, the class will examine some of the major critical approaches in the field.

Satisfies Humanities I-A requirement ; 2 meetings (75 minutes), 1 screening (2 1/2 hours); 4 credits ; enrollment limited to 40

 

FILMST 320: SEM: MODERNISM & THE CINEMA

Tu 7:00-9:00pm (screening) & W 1:00- 3:50pm Art 220/221

R. Blaetz

This topics course provides advanced instruction in an aspect of film history, theory, or criticism. Students are expected to bring substantial background in the study of film to this course; enrollment may be limited.

Fall 2005: This seminar examines the history of modernism in the cinema, beginning with the early cinema of attractions and including surrealist cinema, Soviet cinema, filmmakers such as Carl Dreyer, Robert Bresson, and Ingmar Bergman, and concluding with the work of American Avant-Garde filmmakers such as Stan Brakhage and Hollis Frampton.

Satisfies Humanities I-A requirement; Prereq. Film Studies 201 or 202.; 1 meeting (3 hours), 1 screening (2 hours); 4 credits ; enrollment limited to 12

 

FILMST 380 HENRY JAMES INTO FILM

D. Weber M 7-10pm Shtk 203

(Writing-intensive; See as English 345f (01).)

(American Studies 301f and Film Studies 380f) This seminar will examine the various screen adaptations of assorted novels by Henry James. We will read the novels against the films, exploring how James's texts translate--or do not translate--into film. Novels and films to be studied include Washington Square, The Europeans, Portrait of a Lady, The Turn of the Screw, and Wings of the Dove.

Meets Humanities I-A requirement; Prereq. jr, sr, 8 credits in department beyond English 101, 4 credits in film studies, or permission of instructor; 4 credits; enrollment limited to 15; 1 meeting (3 hours); satisfies English department 1700-1900 requirement; satisfies English department seminar requirement

 

ECON 100 (02) ECONOMICS IN POPULAR FILM

S. Gabriel MW 11:00-12:15pm and M 7-10pm (screening) Skinner 212

First-year seminar (Writing-intensive course)

An introduction to political economy using a wide range of popular films as the object of analysis. For example, students will discuss slavery based on the film A Respectable Trade and the economics of the environment in the context of Erin Brockovich. The basic goal of the course is to provide theoretical tools for applying economic analysis in understanding both historical events and processes and more contemporary issues. See http://www.econfilm.us for a more detailed description.

Meets Social Sciences III-A requirement; 4 credits; enrollment limited to 17; 2 meetings (75 minutes) and 1 film showing (3 hours)

 

GERM 100 (01) THE NEW FACE/S OF GERMANY: CONTEMP GERMAN SOCIETY IN FILM & TEXT

G. Davis TuTh 11:00-12:15pm Ciru 009

First-year seminar (Writing-intensive course)

Taught in English; Film Studies Core Course. In Germany today you will find: cities where much of the population was not born in Germany; 160,000 Turks and fourth-generation Germans of African descent living in Berlin; public schools offering Islamic religious instruction; more Russian Jews emigrating to Germany than to Israel; immigrants of German citizenship who do not know German; East Germans longing for the return of the Wall. Recent German film has represented these diverse faces of Germany, often through comedy. Focus on close analyses of several films, their socio-historical, economic, and cultural contexts. Films to include: Goodbye Lenin, In July, Yasemin, Journey of Hope, Ali--Fear Eats the Soul.

Meets multicultural requirement; meets Humanities I-A requirement; Prereq. Course taught in English; no knowledge of German required; 4 credits; enrollment limited to 25; 2 meetings (75 minutes)

 

PHIL 275 PHILOSOPHY AND FILM

TTh 11:00-12:15pm & T 7-10pm (screening) Skinner 216

T. Wartenberg

An exploration of philosophical issues encountered in the study of film. Why do we need a theory of film? What is a film anyway? Do films have "authors"? How do films engage our emotions? Can films be socially critical? What can we learn from films? These are examples of the topics to be discussed in this course as we investigate the nature of film and its relation to philosophy. There will be weekly required film screenings

Satisfies Humanities I-B requirement; Prereq. 4 credits in department or in Film Studies, or permission of instructor; 4 credits; 2 meetings (75 minutes), 1 screening (3 hours)

 

SPAN 221 INTRO TO SPANISH & LATIN AMERICAN FILM

J. Crumbaugh TuTh 11:00-12:15pm Rees 324

(Speaking- and writing-intensive course) This course offers a broad introduction to the history, politics and aesthetics of Latin American and Spanish cinema in the context of, and in contrast with, cinemas from other regions, especially hegemonic Hollywood aesthetics. This course will also focus specifically on introducing students to the basic terminology and methodologies of film analysis, thus preparing them for the department's film seminar (Spanish 320) and other advanced courses in Film Studies.

Meets multicultural requirement; meets Language requirement or Humanities I-A requirement; Prereq. Spanish 212 or permission by the instructor; 4 credits; enrollment limited to 16; 2 meetings (75 minutes)

 

Part III: * Mount Holyoke Film Component Courses [please check course restrictions for Film Studies program(s) at your home campus]

 

*ENGL 320 JANE AUSTEN: READINGS IN FICTION & FILM

*Film-Component course only

J. Lemly Tu 1:00-3:50 Kndd 107

A study of Austen's six novels through the lenses of Regency culture and of twentieth-century filmmakers. How do these modest volumes reflect and speak to England at the end of world war, on the troubled verge of Pax Britannica? What do the recent films say to and about Anglo-American culture at the millennium? What visions of women's lives, romance, and English society are constructed through the prose and the cinema?

Meets Humanities I-A requirement; Prereq. jr, sr, 8 credits in English/Film studies beyond 101; prior work in eighteenth- to nineteenth-century literature, history, or film recommended; students should have read at least two Austen novels; 4 credits; enrollment limited to 15; 1 meeting (3 hours) plus screenings; satisfies English department 1700-1900 requirement; satisfies English department seminar requirement

*FREN 225 INTRO to CONTEM CULTURE & MEDIA IN FRANCE

*Film-Component course only

C. Rivers MW 11:00-12:15pm Ciru 225

The primary purpose of this course is to familiarize students with contemporary issues in French culture as they are represented in French-speaking media of today.

(Speaking-intensive course) This course will introduce students to contemporary popular culture in France and the French-speaking world, largely through the study of recent (post-1995) best-selling novels, popular music, and feature films. Students will be asked to give formal oral presentations based on up-to-date materials gathered from the Internet and/or French television and to participate actively in class discussion.

Meets Language requirement or Humanities I-A requirement; Prereq. French 203, or placement score of 430+, or department placement; 4 credits; enrollment limited to 16; 2 meetings (75 minutes)

 

*GERM 311 (01) NOSTALGIA & UTOPIA: 19 th CENTURY GERMAN LIT & CULTURE I

*Film-Component course only

G. Davis TuTh 1:15-2:30pm Ciru 009

(Speaking- and writing-intensive course; Film Studies Component Course) This course studies the dramatic cultural and political shifts between the turn of the century and 1848: from the Romantic world view to post-Napoleonic reactionary regression and democratic political activism. Focus on the interrelationship of literature and its social and cultural context, as well as the particular impact of 19th-century thought on 20th-century writers and filmmakers. Short fiction, poetry, and drama by such authors as Büchner, von Droste-Hülshoff, Hebbel, Heine, Kleist, Stifter, and von Ense; modern theatre and film adaptations by Kroetz, Fassbinder, and Stein.

Meets Language requirement or Humanities I-A requirement; Prereq. Open to students who have previously studied German and per permission of department.; 4 credits; 2 meetings (75 minutes)

 

*RELIG 213 RELIGION & FILM

*Film-Component course only

H. Atchley MW 11:00-12:15pm and T 1:00-3:50pm (screening) Rees 307/Clap 225

This course is an investigation of the intersections between film and religion. In it, we will examine how the cultural phenomenon of religion is represented in film and how religion, understood critically and theoretically, can be a useful means to interpret film. We will learn the basic issues inherent in the interpretation of this art form (e.g., How do the visual, aural, and narrative components of film work together to create meaning?), and we will critically investigate the concept of religion as a means to better understanding the significance of cultural practice (e.g., What is religion? What are the myriad ways it is made manifest in culture?).

Meets Humanities I-B requirement; 4 credits; 2 meetings (75 min);1 screening (110 min)

 

 

SMITH

 

Part I: Smith College Production Courses:

 

FLS 280 INTRO TO VIDEO PRODUCTION

Knapp M 1: 10-4:00pm (studio), W 7-9pm (screening)

This video production course introduces the history and contemporary practice of video art and provides the technical and conceptual skills to complete creative individual video projects. Over the course of the semester, students will gain experience in pre-production, production and post-production techniques. Projects are designed to develop basic technical proficiency in the video medium as well as practical skills for the completion of the creative project. Prerequisite: 200 (which may be taken concurrently). Enrollment limited to 13. Priority given to Smith College Film Studies Minors and Five College Film Studies Majors.

 

FLS 282 VIDEO PROD WORKSHOP: NARRATIVE

Hillman W 1: 10-4pm (studio), Thur 7-9 (screening)

Topic: The Body and Space: Re-inventing the Narrative. This is an advanced video production/theory course for students interested in exploring a wide range of approaches to experimental narrative. We will investigate narrative structure through a study of films and videos that question and challenge constructions based on literary and painterly models. In particular, we will consider the determining role of the body and space within visual narrative structure. We will also explore the theories and practice of editing narrative through analysis of editing structures and through individual and collaborative editing exercises. Students will complete a series of narrative projects. The course will include workshops in lighting, sound and advanced editing techniques. Screenings will include works by Nagisa Oshima, Wong Kar Wai, Apichatpong Weerasethakul, Arturo Ripstein, Chantal Akerman, and Catherine Breillat among others. Readings by Giulana Bruno, Hélène Cixous, and Gilles Deleuze. Prerequisite: FLS 280 or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 13. Priority given to Smith College Film Studies Minors and Five College Film Studies Majors.

 

Part II: Smith College Non-Production Courses:

 

FLS 200 INTRO TO FILM STUDIES

Inouye MW2:40-4:00 and M 7-10 (screening) {A} 4 credits

An overview of cinema as an artistic and social force. Students will become familiar with the aesthetic elements of cinema (visual style, editing, cinematography, sound, narration and formal structure), the terminology of film production, and the relations among industrial, ideological, artistic, and social issues. Films (both classic and contemporary) will be discussed from aesthetic, historical and social perspectives, enabling students to approach films as informed and critical viewers. Enrollment limited to 60. Priority given to Smith College Film Studies Minors and Five College Film Studies Majors.

 

FRENCH 244 CITIES OF LIGHT: URBAN SPACES IN FRANCOPHONE FILM

Dawn Fulton TTh 9:00-10:20 and M 7:30-9:30 (screening)

Topics course.: From Paris to Fort-de-France, Montreal to Dakar, we will study how various filmmakers from the francophone world present urban spaces as sites of conflict, solidarity, alienation and self-discovery. How do these portraits confirm or challenge the distinction between urban and non-urban? How does the image of the city shift for "insiders" and "outsiders"? Other topics to be discussed include immigration, colonialism, and globalization. Works by Sembene Ousmane, Denys Arcand, Mweze Ngangura, and Euzhan Palcy. Offered in French. Prerequisite: FRN 230, or permission of the instructor. Weekly required screenings.