UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS
(All courses carry 3-credits unless otherwise indicated)

 

ANTHROPOLOGY
ANTH 106  CULTURE THROUGH FILM  GenEd: G SB
Section Number: 1 Registration Number: 37752
Instructors: Page,Helan-Enoch
Meeting Times: W 18.30-21.30     Building: GRAY Room: 104
Course Notes: This course is open to Orchard Hill RAP program freshmen only.
Exploration of different societies and cultures, and of the field of cultural anthropology through the medium of film. Ethnographic and documentary films; focus on gender roles, ethnicity, race, class, religion, politics, and social change.

ANTH 306 VISUAL ANTHROPOLOGY
Instructors: Urla,Jacqueline L
Section Number: 1 Registration Number: 31179  TTh 11.15-12.30     MACH W-26
Section Notes: An optional colloquium H08 lab is also available for this course.
This course examines the politics and poetics of visual representation in the field of anthropology, focusing primarily, but not exclusively, on the moving image.  Many of us have our first exposure to individuals from cultures other than their own through visual images – film, photography, and tv.  In this class, we will be critically examining how information about cultural diversity is conveyed through visual images and the historical contexts and theoretical frameworks that have shaped the various ways in which “exotic” peoples were put on display, we will look at the implicit evolutionary paradigms that informed early uses of photography for classifying racial types. From there, we will turn to a survey of classic and contemporary ethnographic film.  Students will be asked to examine a variety of documentary, observational, and experimental styles in both ethnographic film and “indigenous media”, and to consider how relations of power and authority are embodied in both form and content.  We will also look at recent attempts by native peoples to produce their own television and video as a way of resisting western-imposed media and protecting a sense of their cultural identities.  Our overall goal will be to better understand how and under what conditions visual images contribute to anthropology’s project of fostering meaningful cross-cultural communication.  Attendance, journal, exams.  Prerequisite: ANTH 104 or 106 or consent of instructor.
 
 

ART
ART 230 PHOTOGRAPHY I
Instructors: N/A
Section Number: 1 Registration Number: 31329  TTh 08.00-10.45     BART Room: 51
Section Number: 2  Registration Number: 31330  TTh 13.25-16.10     BART Room: 51
Course Notes: This course is open to Undergraduate ART, BFA, BFA ED, and BFADES majors only.
Introduction to photographic tools and methods. The balance between self-inquiry and the importance of process and materials as vehicles of meaning. Theory explored through class critiques and slide presentations. Photography examined and discussed both from a personal point of view and in its wider cultural context.

ART 271 INTRO COMP IN FINE ART
Instructors: N/A
Section Number: 1 Registration Number: 31337  MF 09.05-11.50     FAC Room: 444
Section Number: 2  Registration Number: 31338  MW 09.05-11.50     FAC Room: 444
Course Notes: Undergraduate, Graduate students with majors in ART, BFA, BFA-ED, or BFADES only.
Historical overview of the development of computer art and the significant events leading to the development of the field. Projects include hands-on experience with computer imaging for use in the creation of fine art. Prerequisite: completion of foundation courses or consent of instructor.

ART 297H  ST-INTRO VISUAL CULTRURE
Instructors: Jahoda,Susan Eve
Section Number: 1 Registration Number: 38234  WF 09.05-11.00
Visual culture can be roughly defined as material artifacts, buildings and images, plus time-based media and performances, produced by human labor and imagination. These serve practical functions, aesthetic, symbolic, ritualistic or ideological ends and, to a significant extent, address the sense of sight.  The term Visual Culture Studies arises from a number of interdisciplinary fields which include Critical Theory, Cultural Studies, Deconstruction, Feminism, Film Studies, Media Studies, Political Economy, Post-Colonial Studies, Post-Structuralism, Psychoanalytic Theory, Queer Theory, Performance Studies, and Semiotics. Throughout the semester we will touch upon theories from these various disciplines as a way to critically understand what constitutes Visual Culture. Divided into a series of interconnected sections including: Locating the Postmodern, Deconstruction, and The Emergence of the "Subject" in Identity Politics, material will be examined through lectures, readings, discussion, film and video screenings.  It is your responsibility to prepare the weekly readings for discussion, screen the films and videos, complete exams and papers, and keep a notebook/journal which includes notes and responses to each reading, and prepared questions for discussion section.

ART 297Q  ST-ANIMATION FDMTLS
Instructors: Galvis-Assmus,Patricia
Section Number: 1  Registration Number: 38245  TTh 09.05-11.00     FAC Room: 431
With studio.  Introduction to methods and techniques of animation, as well as history of experimental film.  Hands-on work with object, sand, line, and clay animation among others.  Basic audio and video skills. Students develop projects of their own design resulting in a fully edited videotape of their work.  Pre-requisite:  ART 271 or consent of the instructor. Must have taken ART 271. Pre Requisite: Art 271
BFA "CG" Track majors only.

ART 374  INTRO COMPUTER ANIMATN
Instructors: N/A
Section Number: 1 Registration Number: 38260  M 13.25-16.10     FAC Room: 447
Section Number: L1 Registration Number: 38261  M 13.25-15.30     FAC Room: 447
Section Number: L2 Registration Number: 38262  W 15.30-17.30     FAC Room: 447
Course Notes: This course is open to ART, BFA, and BFADES majors only.
First half of a two-semester sequence. With studio. Principles and applications of computer animation in film, video, music, and technology. Introduction to 2D and 3D animation programs. Skills acquired in preparation for production in second semester. Emphasis on professionalism and quality. Prerequisites: ART 271, 297Q. Should be followed by 397, 3D Computer Animation.

ART 375   ELCTRNC STILL PHOTOG
Instructors: N/A
Section Number: 1  Registration Number: 31354  TTh 08.00-10.45     FAC Room: 444
Course Notes: This course is open to ART, BFA, and BFADES majors only.
With studio. Aspects of image processing in the context of electronic still photography. Topics include: image acquisition, image enhancement, image analysis, spatial and color transformation, image display and recording. Students develop images and algorithms for display on various devices. Prerequisites: ART 271 and ART 230 or consent of instructor.

ART 397R  ST-PHOTO III
Instructors: Jahoda,Susan Eve
Section Number: 1  Registration Number: 38272  W 13.25-16.10      BART Room: 51
Section Number: L1 Registration Number: 38271  F 13.25-16.10     BART Room: 53

ART 497J   ST-ADV VIDEO PRODUCTION (CROSSLISTED w/ COMM 497J)
Instructors: Liz Miller
Section Number: 1  Registration Number: 38891  W 13.25-17.25     MACH  Room: E-30D
Lab: W 7:30-9:30pm SC 108
Application process and instructor’s permission required.  Beginning Monday 14 April 2003, applications are available in the Film Studies office, 101 South College.  Tel. 545-3659.  Application deadline is Friday 18 April 2003.  Students will be selected to enroll from the applications submitted.  Course is open to Five College students.  Course capacity: 12

COMMUNICATION
COMM 297D: SPECIAL TOPIC-FILM AND TELEVISION PRODUCTION CONCEPTS
Geisler  411 Machmer
Registration No: 32310 1 LEC Open 125 Location: Herter 231 Time:4:00PM 5:15PM Days: Tue Thu
Lecture, discussion.  This class provides an overview of film and television production principles and processes from script to screen and also prepares students for later hands-on production courses. We will explore  both the art and craft of film and video production, including the roles and functions of the major creative and technical personnel in the scripting/ pre-production, production and post-production phases. Technical aspects such as digital vs. analog media, lighting, lenses, types of film and videotape, crew organization and function, editing concepts, sound recording, etc. will be discussed, as well as creative functions such as dramatic and documentary structure, creating characters, acting for the screen, visualization and composition for the camera and more.   (Course capacity is 150)

COMM 331:  PROGRAM PROCESS IN TELEVISION
Course Director:  David Maxcy, 120 South College
Registration No: 32322 1 LEC Open 36 0 36 N
Location: TBA Time:1:25PM 2:15PM Days: Wed  Instructor: Maxcy,David J.
Registration No: 32323 L1 LAB Open 12 Location: SouthCollg 120 Time:1:25PM 4:25PM Days: Mon
Registration No: 32324 L2 LAB Open 12 Location: SouthCollg 120 Time:9:05AM 12:05PM Days: Wed  Registration No: 32325 L3 LAB Open 12 Location: SouthCollg 120 Time:9:05AM 12:05PM Days: Fri
Lecture, studio. Introduction to concepts and techniques of television production, through lectures, lab exercises, and guided production projects.   All 3 sections will meet together once a week for a 50 minute lecture with the course director.    Each section will then meet once a week for a 3-hour lab session.  COMM Junior or Senior status. (Course capacity is 36 Total/3 sections @12)

COMM 340:  HISTORY OF FILM I
Anderson  308 Machmer
Registration No: 32332 1 LEC Open 100 Location: Herter 227 Time:1:00PM 2:15PM Days: Tue  Instructor: Anderson,Carolyn M.
32335 D1 DIS Open 25 Location: SouthCollg 108 Time:10:10AM 11:00AM Days: Wed  Instructor: TBA
32336 D2 DIS Open 25 Location: SouthCollg 108 Time:11:15AM 12:05PM Days: Wed  Instructor: TBA
32337 D3 DIS Open 25 Location: SouthCollg 108 Time:12:20PM 1:10PM Days: Wed  Instructor: TBA
32338 D4 DIS Open 25 Location: TBA Time:1:25PM 2:15PM Days: Wed  Instructor: TBA
32333 L1 LAB Open 100 Location: Herter 227 Time:4:00PM 6:00PM Days: Tue
Lecture, lab (screening), discussion.  A survey of key events and representative films that mark the history of motion pictures in the United States and other countries to 1950.  In addition to identifying and providing access to major works, the course is designed to facilitate the study of the various influences (industrial, technological, aesthetic, social, cultural, and political) that have shaped the evolution of the medium to the advent of television. (Course capacity is 125 Total/5 discussions @25)

COMM 341:  PRINCIPLES & TECHNIQUES OF FILMMAKING IS NOW LISTED AS 441:  PRINCIPLES AND TECHNIQUES OF FILM-STYLE PRODUCTION

COMM 397S:  SPECIAL TOPIC-ASIAN PACIFIC CINEMA
Ciecko  306 Machmer
37702 L1 LAB Open 25 Location: SouthCollg 108 Time:6:30PM 8:30PM Days: Tue
This course offers a critical look at representations of and by Asian/Pacific Americans. Topics to be considered include the images and roles of Asian/Pacific and Asian/Pacific American filmmakers and actors in Hollywood and the independent scene, Hollywood's constructions of Asians and Pacific Islanders, and representations of Asian/Pacific diasporas in world cinema. Course readings will draw primarily from the emerging corpus of Asian American film criticism and theory. Screenings will include short and feature-length films and videos: narratives, documentaries, experimental, and hybrid and boundary-blurring works. No prerequisites except an interest in media and culture.  (Course capacity is 25).

COMM 433:  ADVANCED TELEVISION PRODUCTION/DIRECTION
Maxcy  120 South College
32369 1 LEC Open 10 Location: SouthCollg 120 Time:11:15AM 3:15PM Days: Tue
32370 L1 LAB Open 10 Location: SouthCollg 120 Time:1:00PM 3:00PM Days: Thu
Lecture, Studio.   Intensive workshop course in advanced concepts and techniques of studio-based television production, with a focus on the direction of live programs.    Under the supervision of the instructor, students will produce individual projects in a variety of genres which will  be aired on local cable television outlets.  Limited to COMM majors. Prerequisites: COMM 331 or consent of the instructor.  (Course capacity is 10)

COMM 441:  PRINCIPLES AND TECHNIQUES OF FILM-STYLE PRODUCTION
Geisler  411 Machmer
32371 LEC Open 12 Location: SouthCollg 108 Time:2:30PM 6:30PM Days: Wed
Lecture, studio.  A hands-on introduction to single-camera filmmaking using 16mm film cameras and/or video camcorders (electronic field production) and non-linear (computer-based) editing. Students will learn concepts of pre-production, shot composition, lighting, visual storytelling, continuity editing, and production & post production audio as they plan, shoot and edit exercises and complete projects.  A "real world" editing project may also be included. Application process and permission of instructor is required.  Beginning Monday, April 14, 2003, applications will be available outside Professor Geisler’s office, Machmer 411.  Application deadline is Wednesday, April 23, 2003.  Students will be selected to enroll from the applications submitted.  Preference is given to COMM Seniors. Pre-requisite: COMM 297D highly recommended or permission of instructor. PLEASE NOTE:  This course was formerly numbered and titled COMM 341-Principles and Techniques of Filmmaking.  Students who have already taken COMM 341 cannot take this course.  (Course capacity is 12)

COMM 493B:  SEMINAR-FILM STEREOTYPING
(Seminar-Social Imagery and Stereotyping in American Film)
Stromgren  412 Machmer
37707 SEM Open 20 Location: SouthCollg 108 Time:1:00PM 5:00PM Days: Mon
Lecture, discussion.  Intensive study of social imagery in film and the role of the American feature film in establishing and reinforcing stereotypes through characterization, narrative design, and thematic development.  Special attention will be given to sex roles and national and racial types as reflected in various genres through representative periods.  Prereqs: COMM 240 or COMM 340.  (Course capacity: 20)

COMM 493E:   SEMINAR-SCREENWRITING
Geisler  411 Machmer
32373 SEM Open 20 Location: SouthCollg 108 Time:11:15AM 12:30PM Days: Tue Thu
Lecture, discussion.  An examination of the art, craft, and business of screenwriting from theoretical and practical perspectives.  Topics include screenplay format and structure, story, plot and character development, dialog and scene description, visual storytelling, pace and rhythm, analysis of professional and student scripts and films, and more.  Written work includes three screenwriting projects.  The focus is on writing for narrative films and, to a limited extent, TV programs.   Prerequisite: 3 hours in COMM film courses.  (Course capacity is 20)

COMM 497J:  SPECIAL TOPIC-ADVANCED VIDEO PRODUCTION
Miller  (5-College)  (Course will be cross-listed with Art)
37714 LEC Open 12 Location: Machmer E-30D Time:1:25PM 5:25PM Days: Wed
Lecture, studio. This advanced video production course is open to five college students who have a solid understanding of basic video production.  In a seminar/studio environment, students will have an opportunity to explore advanced aspects of the medium including proposal development/fundraising, digital editing, sound recording, advanced cinematography, and distribution for finished work. Through in-class critiques and the viewing and discussion of film and video, students will look and think critically about the construction of the moving image and the creative use of sound.  Weekly screenings and readings will be geared towards documentary work but will also include video art to explore a range of visual strategies and aesthetic approaches to video making.  Students will be selected from applications which are available in the Film Studies Office, 101 South College (Tel: 545-3659) UMASS.  The application deadline is Friday, April 18, 2003.   Prerequisites:  COMM 331 or consent of instructor.  (Course capacity for COMM students is 4)

COMM 497U: SPECIAL TOPIC-FILM AND SOCIETY
Norden 409 Machmer
32379 LEC Open 25 Location: SouthCollg 108 Time:2:30PM 4:25PM Days: Tue Thu
Lecture, discussion.  In this course we will investigate the ways that movies function in other than aesthetic contexts and will doubtlessly "visit" such cognate fields as economics, politics, sociology, and psychology along with way.  The semester will be divided into four overlapping units: Development & Structure, Function, Representation, and Audience.  The first unit will cover the emergence and maturation of the American film industry and its connections with other cultural institutions and society in general.  The second unit will focus on individual practitioners within the industry and the roles they have assumed, such as entertainers, historians, and propagandists.  The third unit will examine film and society's mutual causal relationship with special attention paid to film's role as a socio-cultural document.  Finally, the fourth unit will investigate spectatorship issues.  Requirements will likely include research reviews, in-class presentations, and essay exams.  Prerequisites: 6 hours in COMM film courses.  (Course capacity is 25)

COMM 497Z:  SPECIAL TOPIC-AMERICAN CINEMA IN THE 1970’S
Norden  309 Machmer
37720 LEC Open 25 Location: SouthCollg 108 Time:9:30AM 10:45AM Days: Tue
37723 LAB Open 25 Location: SouthCollg 108 Time:6:00PM 8:00PM Days: Thu
Lecture, discussion, lab (screening).  This course will examine the relationship of cinema and society during an often overlooked period in U.S. history: the 1970s.  Sandwiched between the politically active 1960s and the "Greed is Good" 1980s, the 70s decade witnessed a number of strikingly important events -- most notably, the end of a long and divisive war in southeast Asia, the resignation of a U.S. President in the wake of a far-reaching political scandal, and the Supreme Court's Roe v. Wade decision that legalized abortion.  Upheavals of a different sort rocked the movie industry, including the rise of conglomerate takeovers, the growth of the "blockbuster" film (e.g., The Godfather, Jaws, Star Wars) and the exponentially increasing influence of Hollywood's first wave of college-trained filmmakers.  We will explore a range of themes and topics expressed in representative films of the time and attempt to draw connections to the socio-cultural and industrial contexts out of which these films emerged.  We will also study the films' influence during the 1970s and thereafter.  Requirements will likely include in-class presentations and essay exams.  Prerequisites: 6 hours in COMM film courses.  (Course capacity is 25)

COMM 546:  FILM THEORY AND CRITICISM
Ciecko  306 Machmer
37725 LEC Open 25 Location: SouthCollg 108 Time:6:30PM 9:30PM Days: Mon
Lecture, discussion.  An overview of the major theoretical and critical approaches to the study of film.  We will examine various "formulist" an "realist" film theories (which together constitute "classical" film theory), as well as film theories arising from such modern schools of thought as semiology, structuralism, and phenomenology.  We will also cover a wide range of critical methods, including auteur, genre, feminist, psychoanalytic, socio-cultural, and political.  Though we will be relating the readings and lecture material to films screened in class on a weekly basis, the course is less a pragmatic, "how-to" course than a metatheoretical, metacritical one.  Prerequisites:  6 hours in COMM "film" courses (exclusive of COMM 341) or consent of instructor.  (Course capacity is 25)

COMM 597C:  ST-FILM & VIDEO EDUC (Cross-listed with EDUC 539)
Brandon  2A Furcolo
32384 LEC Open 8 Location: Furcolo 21B Time:4:00PM 6:30PM Days: Tue
Lecture, discussion.  This course is designed to explore and encourage the use of creative and relevant films and videos in educational settings and to examine the visual, psychological and technical methods used by filmmakers to convey their messages. A wide variety of films and videos will be shown, and their potential for use in many settings will be explored.  Emphasis will be on developing critical, aesthetic, and social media awareness, examining stereotyping and sex roles in the cinema and facilitating productive and open-ended discussions. Students will be expected to attend all screenings and participate in discussions.  Two papers and one research project will be assigned.  (Course capacity for COMM students is 6)

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE
COMLIT 383—NARRATIVE AVANT-GARDE FILM
(AT) Levine, 305 South College
Lecture: 1  Registration Number: 32228 M 15.35-19.00     HERT 231
Section Number: D1 Registration Number: 32229  T 14.30-15.45   Location: TBA
Section Number: D2 Registration Number: 32230  T 16.00-17.15     Location: TBA
Section Number: D3 Registration Number: 32231   W 14.30-15.45    Location: TBA
Section Number: D4 Registration Number: 32232  T 19.00-20.15       Location: TBA
Lecture, discussion.  Explores modern origin of experimentation in film in avant-garde modes such as Expressionism, Surrealism and contemporary results of this heritage.  Trying to determine if film is the most resolutely modern of the media.  Emphasis  on the ways in which Avant-garde films can problematize themselves through the ploys of telling a story.  By means of a self-consciousness of story-telling which undermines viewer identification, the drive for closure, the demand for origins and order, and even cause and effect, these avant-garde films restore to playfulness its strength and ambiguity. Requirements: one 5  page paper for midterm, final paper or project; attendance.

COMLIT 383H – NARRATIVE AVANT-GARDE FILM Credits: 4
(AT) Levine, 305 South College
Lecture: 1 Registration Number: 37780  M 15.35-19.00     Building: HERT Room: 231
Section Number: D1 Registration Number: 37781  T 14.30-17.30
See above for general course description.  Students in COMLIT 383H must also register for COMLIT H01, a one-credit, hands-on component (for a total of 5 credits).  The purpose is to investigate aspects of film (such as shot formation, camera movement, editing approaches).  Students will collaboratively explore a range of expressive possibilities on video.  Working in groups of four, students will alternate roles of creator/writer, camera-person, editor, etc., in constructing brief scenes.  No experience necessary.  See instructor to register.  Limited places.

COMLIT 384 – VIETNAM:  LIT & FILM
(ALG) Gentzler, 19 Herter
Section Number: L1 Registration Number: 37783  W  16.45-18.45     HERT 227
Section Number: 1 Registration Number: 37782  T 16.00-17.30     SOM 137
Section Number: D1 Registration Number: 37784  F 10.10-11.00
Section Number: D2  Registration Number: 37785  F 10.10-11.00
Section Number: D3  Registration Number: 37786  F 11.15-12.05
Section Number: D4  Registration Number: 37787  F 11.15-12.05
The Vietnam War in Literature and Film teaches students to think critically about how we document and represent the war. In this course, we will compare representations.of the war in French, Vietnamese, and North American poetry, fiction, and film to see how images are used by writers to achieve calculated effects, some of which reinforce or subvert powerful cultural and political institutions. Books read include The Quiet American, Tal6 of Kieu, North China Lover, Green Berets, Dispatches, Heart of Darkness, and Born on the Fourth of July. Films seen include The Quiet American, Hearts and Minds, The Lover, Green Berets, Full Metal Jacket, A Quiet Little Town, and When Heaven and Earth Changed Places. Some historical background will be provided in order to contextualize the literary texts and films assigned. Knowledge of French and/or an Asian language is desirable but not necessary. Papers, response papers, journals, exams, and class discussion reflect students' progress. Students will be evaluated on their participation in class, grasp of comparative methodology, engagement with ideas, and critical thinking.

COMLIT 391B – FRENCH FILM
Portuges, 311 South College
Section Number: 1 Registration Number: 32239  M 15.30-18.00     HERT 227
Instructors: Portuges,Catherine & Schwartzwald,Robert S
Section Number: D1 Registration Number: 32240  T 09.30-10.20
Section Number: D2 Registration Number: 32241  Th 11.15-12.05
Section Number: D3 Registration Number: 32242  Th 13.00-13.50
Section Number: D4 Registration Number: 32243  Th 14.30-15.20
Section Number: D5 Registration Number: 32244  Th 13.00-13.50
Lectures;  film and video screenings; discussions. Concentrates  on the development of French films from the 1930s and its relations to French culture and society. Focuses on the art of French film, close reading of specific films, the ideology of different film practices, and relevant aspects of film theory, including questions of social, political and gender representation. Screenings of films and video tapes by directors such as Vigo, Carne, Renior, Bresson, Resnais, Godard, Truffaut, Rohmer, Ackerman, Kurys, and Tavernier. The films are in French with English subtitles. The language of instruction is English.  Requirements:  regular attendance at lectures, screenings, discussions groups; one short and one medium length paper; one midterm exam. Texts: Film Art: An Introduction. Prerequisites: any introductory course in analysis of film or its equivalent through practiced viewing and a serious interest in twentieth-century cultural life.

COMLIT 597F ST-FILM AND LITERATURE
Instructors: Byg,Barton B
Section Number: 1 Registration Number: 38761  TTh 14.30-15.45

COMLIT 695A -- INTERNATIONAL FILM NOIR
Levine, 305 South College
Section Number: 1 Registration Number: 37796  W 14.30-18.30
Lecture.  Often referred to as the only indigenous American film style, "film noir" in its very appellation reveals that its major effects (for certain modern conceptions of cinema) lay elsewhere.  We will examine film noir in its American heyday (1945-1957) and how it came to be a major propelling force in the new European cinema of the 1960's (Godard,  and the Cahiers du cinema).  How film noir displaces American social mores and their constitution of "reality" within the imaginary and symbolic fields, and within the symptomatic concretization of those fields that is normative (dominant) cinema.  How film noir both makes film different and allows already latent difference to be manifested.  How film noir takes shape in the U.S. as expression of the inexpressible (and the ‘unheimlich”) or, at least, of the allusion to it; which in the lens and on the screen of directors such as Godard and Fassbinder becomes pseudomorphic, presenting a critique of American imperialism both public (political) and private (psychic) – the American way of death and love (or, as the title of one work would have it, Love & Napalm: Export USA). Films by:  American directors such as Aldritch, Ray, Fuller, Kubrick, Welles; Foreign agents such as Lang, Ophuls, Siodmak, Sirk, Von Sternberg; European directors such as Godard, Fassbinder, Wenders.  Prerequisite: 2 prior film courses or permission of instructor.

EDUCATION
U1   12317 EDUC 505 DOCUMTRY FILMMKG ED 01 LEC Capacity: 12
Location: Furcolo 21B Time:4:00PM 6:30PM Days: Wed  Instructor: Brandon,Liane
Introduction to practical filmmaking for educators and others to document their research and educational endeavors. Emphasis on making super-8 films using live-action photography and editing techniques.

U1   12331 EDUC 539 FILM & VIDEO IN EDUC 01 LEC  Capacity:12
Location: Furcolo 21B Time:4:00PM 6:30PM Days: Tue  Instructor: Brandon,Liane
Explores and encourages use of creative and stimulating films and videos in educational settings; techniques used by filmmakers; methods for structuring film discussions. Same as COMM 597C.

ENGLISH
ENGL 339 FILM AND LITERATURE
Instructors: Burt,Richard A
Section Number: 1 Registration Number: 37917  TTh 09.30-10.45
“Psycho-Cinem-Analysis” Course Description: "The age of media," Friedrich Kittler writes in Gramophone, Film, Typewriter," renders indistinguishable what is human and what is machine, who is mad and who is faking it." This course will take up this proposition by examining theoretical accounts of psychosis drawn from psychoanalysis and media theory in relation to the representation of psychosis in art and popular films, ranging from the lonely streets and dead ends of film noir to the dark spaces of science fiction. The techno-delusional systems and discourse networks of psychosis mark in theory and in film the ambiguous intersection of the human and post human (cyborg), madness and media, urban space and architecture, peace and war, and gender and sexuality. Readings to include Dr. Daniel Schreber, Memoirs of My Mental Illness; Sigmund Freud, writings on Schreber, psychosis, and the uncanny; Jacques Lacan, writings on psychosis and the Lapin sisters; Friedrich Kittler, selections from Discourse Networks and Gramophone, Film, Typewriter; Laurence Rickels, The Vampire Lectures; Anthony Vidler, The Architectural Uncanny: Essays in the Modern Unhomely; Slavoj Zizek, Looking Awry: An Introduction to Jacques Lacan through Popular Culture. Films to include Edgar G. Ulmer, Detour; Alfred Hitchcock, Psycho and Vertigo; David Cronenberg, Videodrome and Crash; Terry Gilliam 12 Monkeys (remake of Chris Marker, La Jettee); David Fincher, Fight Club and The Game; David Lynch, Lost Highway and Mulholland Drive; Craig Bierko, Thirteenth Floor; Ridley Scott, Bladerunner; Shinya Tsukamoto, Tetsuo: The Iron Man; Andrei Tarkovsky, Solaris, and the Steven Soderbergh remake; Mark Pellington, Mothman Prophecies; Alex Proyas, Dark City (with Keifer Sutherland as Dr. Daniel Schreber); and several films related to the Papin sisters: The Maids, Sister, My Sister, La Ceremonie, and Les Blessures Assassines. WARNING: This will be a very demanding course. All films will have to be viewed outside of class. If you're looking for a light, diverting course, please look elsewhere.

FRENCH
FREN 350 FRENCH FILM
Instructors: Portuges,Catherine Schwartzwald,Robert S
Section Number: A Registration Number: 38971  M 15.30-18.00     HERT 227
Section Number: AD1 Registration Number: 38972  T 09.30-10.45
Section Number: AD2 Registration Number: 38973  T 11.15-12.30
Section Number: AD3 Registration Number: 38974  T 13.00-14.15
Section Number: AD4 Registration Number: 38975  T 14.30-15.45
Section Number: AD5 Registration Number: 39226  T 13.00-14.15
Section Notes: An optional honors colloquium is available only for students registering for discussion 5 (taught in French). Same as COMP-LIT 391B.  See COMLIT description.

GERMAN
GER 304 FROM BERLIN TO HOLLYWOOD GenEd: AT
Instructors: Byg,Barton B
Section Number: 1 Registration Number: 33720  TTh 11.15-12.30
Section Number: L1 Registration Number: 33721  W 18.00-22.00
Conducted in English. Lecture, discussion. From Caligari and Metropolis to Run, Lola, Run, films from Germany have had great international influence, particularly on popular culture of the United States.  Survey of prewar German cinema, including the great directors who emigrated to the U.S., such as Lang and Murnau. Then the successors to the Golden Age will be discussed: the Nazi cinema, postwar  cinema in both German states, the recent ``second Americanization" of German  film and its place in the  international media landscape.. Midterm, final,  short papers. Film screenings outside class time.

GER 597F  ST-LITERATURE AND FILM
Instructors: Byg,Barton B
Section Number: 1  Registration Number: 38198  TTh 14.30-15.45
Section Number: L1 Registration Number: 38199  W 18.00-22.00
*No description available yet.

GER 697H HISTORY AND FILM: THE EUROPEAN CASE
Instructors: Karl, Lars
Section Number: 1 Registration Number: 38992  Th 18.00-20.30
Section Number: L1 Registration Number: 38993  T 18.00-20.30
This course considers the ways in which European history has been represented on the screen. Focusing on the 20th century, we examine the ways in which 'history' is constructed on film. Has film seized our  historical imagination, or has it stimulated and liberated it? Is it possible to present multiple interpretations of an historical event on film? How is history written for the screen? Our key concern throughout the course is to explore the ways in which popular cinema represents, reconstructs and interprets perceived realities of the past, and the relation of such representation to a sociohistoric present

HISTORY
HIST 697F  ST- HISTORY AND FILM: THE EUROPEAN CASE
Instructors: Karl, Lars
Section Number: 1 Registration Number: 39213  Th 18.00-20.30
Course Notes: Graduate History majors only; Section Notes: Same as German 697H.
See GER 697H course description.

HONORS (COMMONWEALTH COLLEGE)
HONORS 499C CAPSTONE LATINOS IN HOLLYWOOD 1 IND Open 16
Instructor: McKenna,Susan E.
Location: TBA Time:4:00PM 5:15PM Days: Thu
Sched#:  33942 Instructor:  Susan McKenna
Eligibility:  JR and SR Honors Students only
This Honors Capstone Course will examine the portrayals of Hispanics, Chicanos, and Latinos in the Hollywood entertainment industries. Although our primary focus will be on film, we will also check out television programming and advertising. The course will be structured around: historical stereotypes in early film; thematic approaches to contemporary film texts and audiences; and media texts of resistance by Latino filmmakers. We will discuss these portrayals against the backdrops of three interdisciplinary frameworks that will be interwoven throughout the course: the history of Latinos in the United States; the history of Hollywood production and consumption with a focus on Latino specificity; and the overview of approaches to media and historical analysis. Because research into the portrayals of U.S. Latino identities is relatively underdeveloped, students will have the opportunity to contribute to a much needed area of academic inquiry. Follow up with HONORS 499D in spring 2004.

THEATER 499C CAPSTONE COURSE - WRITING FOR STAGE AND SCREEN - 1st Semester
Instructor:  Julian Olf
Sched#: not available     Eligibility:  SR HONORS STUDENTS ONLY
This Honors Capstone Course is the first part of a two-semester sequence course concluding in the spring semester of 2004. The two-course sequence (total of 8 credits) fulfills the Commonwealth College Culminating Experience Requirement. During the first semester students will study narration for stage and screen, and will undertake a series of writing projects aimed at developing story-telling skills. During the second semester each student will write an original one-act play or short screenplay. All students who register for THEATER 499C in fall 2003 are expected to take the 4-credit continuation course in spring 2004 (THEATER 499D), which will be offered in approximately the same TUTH time period. Any students who have, or may have conflicts with that time, or with enrollment generally in the spring semester, must contact the professor and disclose those conflicts to remain in good standing for the course. STUDENTS MUST CONTACT INSTRUCTOR TO ADD COURSE. PLEASE BRING A DEGREE PROGRESS OR TRANSCRIPT TO INSTRUCTOR PROVING MEMBERSHIP IN COMMONWEALTH COLLEGE. Prerequisites:  NONE.  NOTES:  Prior study of theater or film is preferred, though not required. Evidence of writing ability is required.

COMP-LIT 499D/01 CAPSTONE COURSE - 1st Sem, Lect 01 - NARRATIVE AVANT-GARDE FILM
Instructor:  Don Eric Levine
Sched#: not available  M 3:35-7:00, T 2:30-5:30, Th 2:30-4:30
Eligibility:  Junior and Senior Honors Students Only
This 6-credit Capstone Course fulfills the Commonwealth College culminating experience requirement. By means of close visual analysis of avant-garde films, the course investigates how we might gain distance on our life fictions. This interdisciplinary course questions and undermines viewer identification with film narrative, examining how what we take to be the "truth" is largely formed by the bond between media (film) and "reality." The world is now media-ted. Recommended for students who have a keen interest in film. Students attend a large lecture and film screening (once a week), an intensive seminar-style section of 2-3 hours the next day, on Thursday a film making component for 2 hours, There will be a series of one-on-one meetings to keep tabs on progress and expectations. There will be a take-home mid-term essay (six pages) and final essay (ten pages), two two-page analyses of specific shots or scenes, and an intensive final film project (15-20 minutes). Students will also investigate aspects of film-making (such as shot formation, camera movement, editing approaches) by collaboratively exploring a range of expressive possibilities on video. Working in groups of four, students will alternate roles of director/editor, writer, cameraperson, assistant in constructing brief films (2-6 minutes). No prior experience necessary. This 6-credit course may qualify a student for high Latin honors, if they have fulfilled other specific requirements. See a Commonwealth College advisor for more information. Preference in registration given to seniors using this course toward their culminating experience requirement; others as space permits. Contact Commonwealth College, 504 Goodell to register.

ITALIAN
ITAL  450 VISON EVERYDY VIOLNC
Instructors: Stone,Jennifer A.
Section Number: 1 Registration Number: 39088  T 19.00-22.00     HERT Room: 231
Instructors: N/A
Section Number: D1 Registration Number: 39089  Th 11.15-12.30
Section Number: D2 Registration Number: 39090  Th 13.00-14.15
Section Notes: Same as JUDAIC 497D.
Films made by Italian-American directors influenced by Italian neo-realism and other European traditions. Also Italian-American actors. Key directors from the East Coast School (Scorsese, De Niro, Ferrara) contrasted with those whose work is derived from the Hollywood code (Coppola, Leone, Tarantino). The problem of "everyday violence" examined from a Freudian psychoanalytic perspective in terms of paranoia, psychosis or the alternative of healthy sublimation. Questions of genre (Western mythology), urban seriality, and European immigration explored in terms of identity and psychopathology. Italian directors engaged in Hollywood genres and Americans exploiting Italian characters (Wertmuller, Jarmusch, Leone). Film screenings in English. Taught in English.

JUDAIC STUDIES
JUDAIC 191D S-AMERICAN JEWISH EXPR IN FILM  Credits: 1
Note: This course does not count towards the UMASS Film  Certificate.
Instructors: Seltzer,Deborah J.
Section Number: 1 Registration Number: 37792  W 16.40-18.30
Section Notes: Course meets at Hillel House. Call 549-1710 for information. Full Title: From Stickball to Kugel to Baseball and Apple Pie: The American Jewish Experience in Film.

JUDAIC 497D ST-Italian-American Film
Instructors: Stone,Jennifer A.
Section Number: 1 Registration Number: 38988  T 19.00-22.00     HERT Room: 231
Section Notes: Same as ITALIAN 450.  See course description under ITAL 450.

LEGAL
LEGAL 397X  ST-MEDIA CENSORSHIP
Instructors: Brooks,Dianne L.
Section Number: 1 Registration Number: 34226  TTh 13.00-14.15
Section Number: L1 Registration Number: 34227  M 16.00-18.00     HAS Room: 134
This course examines the history of film censorship in Hollywood by focusing on external legal mechanisms, internal quasi-legal self-regulation and the contribution of foreign films.  We will also examine film regulation in an international context in, for example, Britain, China, India and Iran.  There is no prerequisite for this course.

MUSIC
MUSIC 170H  MUSIC IN FILM
Instructors: Rideout,Roger R
Section Number: 1 Registration Number: 36591  TTh 13.00-14.15     FAC Room: 154
Course Notes: Open to Honors Learning Community HD freshman students only.
The aesthetics and dramatic techniques of film music since 1895.  Excerpts from commercial silent era and sound films viewed and studied as examples of film music development and the composer's art.  Students will construct two soundtracks for specific scenes.  No special skills or prerequisities required.  Two weeks of the course devoted specifically to the music and film innovations of one feature film.  Students will complete 5-10 page paper on some technical aspect of that film.

POLITICAL SCIENCE
POLISCI 201 AMERICAN POLITICS THROUGH FILM
Mileur,Jerome M
39166 LEC Open 100 Location: Herter 227 Time:7:00PM 9:30PM Days: Wed
Location: Thompson 106 Time:9:05AM 9:55AM Days: Mon Wed
39167 D1 DIS Open 25 Location: TBA Time:9:05AM 9:55AM Days: Fri
39168 D2 DIS Open 25 Location: TBA Time:10:10AM 11:00AM Days: Fri
39169 D3 DIS Open 25 Location: TBA Time:12:20PM 1:10PM Days: Fri
39170 D4 DIS Open 25 Location: TBA Time:11:15AM 12:05PM Days: Fri
39171 D5 DIS Open 25 Location: TBA Time:12:20PM 1:10PM Days: Fri
39172 D6 DIS Open 25 Location: TBA Time:1:25PM 2:15PM Days: Fri

POLISCI 293A S-PLTC EUROPEAN FILM
Xenos,Nicholas
35549 1 SEM Open 45 Location: TBA Time:7:00PM 9:30PM Days: Mon
Location: TBA Time:1:00PM 2:15PM Days: Tue

THEATER
THEATER 397D ST-MOVIES FM PLAYS:COSTUME INTERPRETATION
Warner,Patricia C
39176 1 LEC Open 25 Location: FineArtCtr 201 Time:2:30PM 3:45PM Days: Tue Thu
This course will explore the role of costume design in a series of movies that have been made from plays from the 1900’s to the 1990’s.  Students will learn how critical costuming is in placing the movie in its own timeframe, and in interpreting the play’s period.  Students will be required to read the original plays, watch the subsequent movie(s) and write papers on the actualizations from word to film as they relate to costume