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FALL 2002 UMASS & FIVE COLLEGE
FILM & VIDEO COURSE GUIDE

Please be sure to contact college and department offices to verify course info during pre-registration and at the beginning of the semester.
INFORMATION MAY CHANGE!
Important information for UMASS Film Studies Certificate students:
Please note not all courses listed can be applied to Certificate requirements.  Courses listed as “Related Courses” will not be counted towards the Certificate.
If you have questions, please make an advising appointment at the Film Studies office at 101 South College, UMASS (413) 545-3659.
Additional information also available at the website at www.umass.edu/film.





 
UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS

(All courses carry 3-credits unless otherwise indicated)

ANTHROPOLOGY
ANTH 106O  CULTURE THROUGH FILM   (Orchard Hill residents only)
Section  Number   Meeting Times  Building Room Number  Instructor
1  486087   W 18.30-21.30  GRAY 104   PAGE,H
Films, lectures, discussion. Exploration of different societies and cultures, and theories of cultural anthropology through the medium of film. Ethnographic, documentary, and feature films are used to focus on a wide array of cultures and to examine such topics as ecological adaptations, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, religion, politics, and social change. Cinema as a medium of communication and cross-cultural understanding.

ANTH 306  VISUAL ANTHROPOLOGY
Section   Number     Meeting Times   Building Room Number   Instructor
LEC 1     486185     TUTH 11.15-12.30          URLA,J.
LAB 1    486192       W 18.30-20.30
This course examines the politics and poetics of visual representation in the field of anthropology, focusing primarily, but not exclusively, on the moving image.  Many of us have our first exposure to individuals from cultures other than their own through visual images – film, photography, and tv.  In this class, we will be critically examining how information about cultural diversity is conveyed through visual images and the historical contexts and theoretical frameworks that have shaped the various ways in which “exotic” peoples were put on display, we will look at the implicit evolutionary paradigms that informed early uses of photography for classifying racial types. From there, we will turn to a survey of classic and contemporary ethnographic film.  Students will be asked to examine a variety of documentary, observational, and experimental styles in both ethnographic film and “indigenous media”, and to consider how relations of power and authority are embodied in both form and content.  We will also look at recent attempts by native peoples to produce their own television and video as a way of resisting western-imposed media and protecting a sense of their cultural identities.  Our overall goal will be to better understand how and under what conditions visual images contribute to anthropology’s project of fostering meaningful cross-cultural communication.  Attendance, journal, exams.  Prerequisite: ANTH 104 or 106 or consent of instructor.

ANTH 697F  ST- VISUAL ANTHROPOLOGY
Same course as above at Graduate level

ART
ART 230 PHOTOGRAPHY I    ART, BFA, BFADES MAJORS ONLY
Section Number   Meeting Times   Building Room Number Instructor
1 487662    TUTH    8.00-10.45  BART    51
2 487669    TUTH    1.25-4.10  BART    51
Introduction to photographic tools and methods. The balance between self-inquiry and the importance of process and materials as vehicles of meaning. Theory explored through class critiques and slide presentations. Photography examined and discussed both from a personal point of view and in its wider cultural context.

ART 297H ST-INTRO TO VISUAL CULTURE: THEORY & PRACTICE 3CR HONORS COURSE
RECOMMENDED FOR JUNIORS AND SENIORS.
Section  Number   Meeting  Times   Building Room Number  Instructor
 1  561708     TUTH   9.05-11.00                                     JAHODA,S.
Visual culture can be roughly defined as material artifacts, buildings and images, plus time-based media and performances, produced by human labor and imagination. These serve practical functions, aesthetic, symbolic, ritualistic or ideological ends and, to a significant extent, address the sense of sight.  The term Visual Culture Studies arises from a number of interdisciplinary fields which include Critical Theory, Cultural Studies, Deconstruction, Feminism, Film Studies,
Media Studies, Political Economy, Post-Colonial Studies, Post-Structuralism, Psychoanalytic Theory, Queer Theory, Performance Studies, and Semiotics. Throughout the semester we will touch upon theories from these various disciplines as a way to critically understand what constitutes Visual Culture. Divided into a series of interconnected sections including: Locating the Postmodern, Deconstruction, and The Emergence of the "Subject" in Identity Politics, material will be examined through lectures, readings, discussion, film and video screenings.  It is your responsibility to prepare the weekly readings for discussion, screen the films and videos, complete exams and papers, and keep a notebook/journal which includes notes and responses to each reading, and prepared questions for discussion section.

ART 297Q ST-ANIMATION TECH
ART, BFA, BFADES MAJORS ONLY. Contact department to add course. Prereq: ART 271.
Section  Number   Meeting Times        Building Room Number  Instructor
1   487893    TUTH   9.05-11.00    FAC     447                  GALVIS-ASSMUS
With studio.  Introduction to methods and techniques of animation, as well as history of experimental film.  Hands-on work with object, sand, line, and clay animation among others.  Basic audio and video skills. Students develop projects of their own design resulting in a fully-edited videotape of their work.  Pre-requisite:  ART 271 or consent of the instructor.

ART 397V ST - ADVANCED VIDEO PRODUCTION: Exploring Sound and Sound as Art
Section  Number   Meeting Times   Building Room Number  Instructor
1  573244            TU 7:30 – 9:30 screening  FAC 446  STEUERNAGEL
   W 9-12 lecture/lab FAC Slide Room
This course will focus on the exploration of sound and the creation of sound art as a stand-alone entity as well as an accompaniment to moving images.  Each week students will be asked to complete one of a variety of aural experiments that may include creating instruments, performances, soundscapes, and videos. Class will also include weekly "listenings" and screenings. These will be supplemented by readings that offer a theoretical and historical context in which to think about sound and sound as art.  Pre-Requisite:   Introduction to Video Production

ART 374 INT COMPUTER ANIMATION
ART, BFA, BFADES "CG" track Majors ONLY.
Contact department to add course. Must have taken ART 271.
Section  Number   Meeting Times    Building Room Number  Instructor
1 488131       TUTH 1.25-4.10  FAC   444
2           561806       TUF    12.30-3.20 FAC         444
First half of a two-semester sequence. With studio. Principles and applications of computer animation in film, video, music, and technology. Introduction to 2D and 3D animation programs. Skills acquired in preparation for production in second semester. Emphasis on professionalism and quality. Prerequisites: ART 271, 297Q. Should be followed by 397, 3D Computer Animation.
 

ART 375 ELCTRNC STILL PHOTOGRAPHY
ART, BFA, BFADES MAJORS ONLY. Contact department to add course. Prereq: ART 230 and 271.
Section   Number     Meeting  Times   Building Room Number  Instructor
1  488145      TUTH  8.00-10.45 FAC  444
With studio. Aspects of image processing in the context of electronic still photography. Topics include: image acquisition, image enhancement, image analysis, spatial and color transformation, image display and recording. Students develop images and algorithms for display on various devices. Prerequisites: ART 271 and ART 230 or consent of instructor.

ART HISTORY  Related Course ONLY
ARTHIS 115 INTRO TO VISUAL ARTS
Section    Number     Meeting    Times  Building      Room Number        Instructor
1              490070      MWF        10.10    Thompson        104  DENNY,W.
Introduction to art works and to the discipline of art history, for those with no formal course experience with the history of art. Organized primarily on a topical rather than a historical basis. Variables that contribute to a work of art; rudiments of stylistic and formal analysis; the progression of style through history; patronage, cross-influences; training and evaluation of artists; criticism and economics of art; iconography and connoisseurship and artistic diversity in non-Western cultures. For non-majors.

COMMUNICATION
COMM 297D: SPECIAL TOPIC-FILM AND TELEVISION PRODUCTION CONCEPTS
Section  Number  Meeting Times   Building Room Number  Instructor
1  566244   TUTH 9.30-10.45  HERT 231   GEISLER,B.
Lecture, discussion.  This class provides an overview of film and television production principles and processes from script to screen and also prepares students for later hands-on production courses. We will explore both the art and craft of film and video production, including the roles and functions of the major creative and technical personnel in the scripting/ pre-production, production and post-production phases. Technical aspects such as digital vs. analog media, lighting, lenses, types of film and videotape, crew organization and function, editing concepts, sound recording, etc. will be discussed, as well as creative functions such as dramatic and documentary structure, creating characters, acting for the screen, visualization and composition for the camera and more.   (Course capacity is 125)

COMM 331:  PROGRAM PROCESS IN TELEVISION
Course Director:  David Maxcy, 120 South College
Section     Number  Meeting Times  Building Room Number  Instructor
LEC 1     572341  W 1.25       MAXCY,D.
LAB 1      572348  M 1.25-4.25 SC 120
LAB 2      572355   W 9.05-12.05 SC 120
LAB 3      572362  F 9.05-12.05 SC 120
Lecture, studio.   Introduction to concepts and techniques of television production, through lectures, lab exercises, and guided production projects.    All 3 sections will meet together once a week for a 50 minute lecture with the course instructor.    Each section will then meet once a week for a 4-hour lab session.  COMM Junior or Senior status. (Course capacity is 36 Total/3 sections @12)

COMM 340:  HISTORY OF FILM I
Section  Number   Meeting Times  Building Room Number  Instructor
LEC 1  500598   TU 1.00-2.15  HERT 227   ANDERSON,C.
LAB 1  500605   TU 18.00-20.00  HERT 227   ANDERSON,C.
DIS 1  500612   W 9.05   SC 108    ANDERSON,C.
DIS 2  500619   W 12.20  SC 108
DIS 3  500626   W 3.35   SC 108
DIS 4 500633   W 4.40   SC 108
DIS 5  500640   W 5.45-18.35  SC 108
Lecture, lab (screening), discussion.  A survey of key events and representative films that mark the history of motion pictures in the United States and other countries to 1950.  In addition to identifying and providing access to major works, the course is designed to facilitate the study of the various influences (industrial, technological, aesthetic, social, cultural, and political) that have shaped the evolution of the medium to the advent of television. (Course capacity is 125 Total/5 discussions @25)

COMM 341:  PRINCIPLES & TECHNIQUES OF FILMMAKING IS NOW LISTED AS 441:  PRINCIPLES AND TECHNIQUES OF FILM-STYLE PRODUCTION (see below)
COMM 433:  ADVANCED TELEVISION PRODUCTION/DIRECTION
Section  Number   Meeting Times  Building Room Number   Instructor
LEC 1  501263   TU 11.15-3.15  SC 120     MAXCY,D.
LAB 1  501270   TH 1.00-3.00  SC 120     MAXCY,D
Lecture, Studio.   Intensive workshop course in advanced concepts and techniques of studio-based television production, with a focus on the direction of live programs.    Under the supervision of the instructor, students will produce individual projects, and will work as a team in the production of a weekly series which is to be aired on local cable television outlets.  Limited to COMM majors. Prerequisites: COMM 331 or consent of the instructor.  (Course capacity is 10)

COMM 441:  PRINCIPLES AND TECHNIQUES OF FILM-STYLE PRODUCTION
Section  Number  Meeting Times   Building Room Number  Instructor
1  572439  TUTH 1.00-2.15   SC 108    GEISLER,B
Lecture, studio.  A hands-on introduction to single-camera filmmaking using 16mm film cameras and/or video camcorders (electronic field production) and non-linear (computer-based) editing.   Students will learn concepts of pre-production, shot composition, lighting, visual storytelling, continuity editing, and production & post production audio as they plan, shoot and edit exercises and complete projects.  A "real world" editing project may also be included. COMM Seniors only. Pre-requisite: COMM 297D highly recommended or permission of instructor. PLEASE NOTE:  This course formerly numbered and titled COMM 341-Principles and Techniques of Filmmaking-Students who have already taken COMM 341 cannot take this course. (Course capacity is 12)

COMM 444:  FILM STYLES AND GENRES: SCREEN SATIRE
Section  Number   Meeting Times  Building Room Number  Instructor
1  566377   MW 10.10-12.05 SC 108    STROMGREN,R.
Lecture, discussion.  The nature, function, theory, and practice of screen satire.  Focus on how irony, parody, spoof, caricature, and other forms of comic wit have been employed by key directors in satiric observations of social institutions, practices, and thought.  Requirements: class reports, individual research projects, and 2 exams.  Prerequisites: COMM 240 or COMM 340.  (Course capacity is 25)

COMM 493E:   SEMINAR-SCREENWRITING
Section  Number  Meeting Times   Building Room Number   Instructor
1  501284  TUTH 11.15-12.30  SC 108     NORDEN,M.
2  566405  W 3.35-18.35   MACH E-33    GEISLER,B.
Lecture, discussion.  An examination of the art, craft, and business of screenwriting from theoretical and practical perspectives.  Topics included: the nature of screenplay formats and structures;  creation and development of premise, plot, character, and action; scene writing; adaptation issues; place of the screenwriter in the collaborative process of filmmaking; and marketing strategies.  The focus will be on scriptwriting for storytelling movies and, to a limited extent, TV programs.  In-class activities will include exercises in visual thinking, scene analyses, and staged readings.  Written work will include several screenwriting projects.  Prerequisite: 3 hours in COMM film courses.  (Course capacity is 20)

COMM 497D:  SPECIAL TOPIC –INTERNATIONAL WOMEN FILMMAKERS
Section  Number   Meeting Times  Building Room Number  Instructor
LEC 1  566391   MW 1.25-2.40  SC 108    CIECKO,A.
LAB 1  566398   TU 18.30-20.30  SC 108    CIECKO,A.
Lecture, discussion.  This course examines international filmmaking by and about women. Readings will focus on such topics as national film industries and gender, feminist film theory, authorship, genre, and reception. We will screen & discuss recent feature productions (& co-productions) from a variety of countries, possibly including the following:  Australia, Brazil, Canada, China (Hong Kong), France, India, Iran, Mexico, the Philippines, Poland, Tunisia, South Korea, the UK, the US, & Zimbabwe. Introductory courses in gender/ women's studies and film studies are recommended.(Course capacity is 25).

COMM 497U:  SPECIAL TOPIC-FILM AND SOCIETY
Section  Number   Meeting Times   Building Room Number  Instructor
1  566447   TUTH 2.30-4.25   SC 108    NORDEN,M.
Lecture, discussion.  In this course we will investigate the ways that movies function in other than aesthetic contexts and will doubtlessly "visit" such cognate fields as economics, politics, sociology, and psychology along the way.  The semester will be divided into four overlapping units: Development & Structure, Function, Representation, and Audience.  The first unit will cover the emergence and maturation of the American film industry and its connections with other cultural institutions and society in general.  The second unit will examine the various roles that filmmakers have assumed, such as entertainers, historians, and propagandists.  The third unit will examine film and society's mutually causal relationship with special attention paid to film's role as a socio-cultural document.  Finally, the fourth unit will investigate spectatorship issues.  Requirements will likely include research reviews, in-class presentations, and original research projects.  Prerequisites: 6 hours in COMM film courses.  (Course capacity is 25)

COMM 597C:  SPECIAL TOPICS-FILM & VIDEO EDUC (Cross-listed with EDUC 539)
Section  Number  Meeting Times  Building Room Number   Instructor
1  501459  TU 4.00-18.30  FURC 21B    BRANDON,L.
Lecture, discussion.  This course is designed to explore and encourage the use of creative and relevant films and videos in educational settings and to examine the visual, psychological and technical methods used by filmmakers to convey their messages. A wide variety of films and videos will be shown, and their potential for use in many settings will be explored.  Emphasis will be on developing critical, aesthetic, and social media awareness, examining stereotyping and sex roles in the cinema and facilitating productive and open-ended discussions. Students will be expected to attend all screenings and participate in discussions.  Two papers and one research project will be assigned.  (Course capacity for COMM students is 8)

COMM 693D SEM-INTRO FILM THEORY
Section  Number  Meeting Times  Building Room Number  Instructor
1  501501  M 18.30-21.30  SC 108    CIECKO,A

Related Communication courses:
COMM 222:  MEDIA PROGRAMMING AND INSTITUTIONS
Section  Number   Meeting Times  Building Room Number   Instructor
1  500318   MWF 2.30  THOM 104    MORGAN,M.
Lecture.  An introduction to the entire media programming process, with a special focus on the institutional structures and constraints that shape the content of the electronic media.  We will consider a variety of historical, technological, cultural, legal, political, economic, ethical, and other factors which influence programming, especially in terms of how they are playing out on the currently unfolding media scene.  We will explore dynamic interactions among communications institutions and industries, new technologies, and governmental and other regulatory bodies, all in terms of their impact on the production, distribution, and consumption of electronic media content.  (Course capacity is 300)

COMM 226:  SOCIAL IMPACT OF MASS MEDIA
Section  Number   Meeting Times   Building Room Number  Instructor
1  566195   TUTH 9.30-10.45  THOM 104   SCHARRER,E
Lecture. The aim of the course is to explore research into the influence of the mass media on individuals. The course will examine the influence of the media in terms of selected topics, such as gender role socialization, effects on political decision making, and effects of violence, and selected media, such as television, news media, and video games.  (Course capacity is 300)

COMM 334:  MEDIA HISTORY AND COMMUNICATION POLICY
Section  Number   Meeting Times  Building Room Number  Instructor
LEC 1  572390   W 3.35-5.15  HERT 227   PAREDES,M.
DIS 1  572397   W 10.10
DIS 2  572404   F 10.10
DIS 3  572411   W 11.15
DIS 4  572418   F 11.15
DIS 5  572425   W 1.25
Lecture, discussion.  The purpose of this course is to examine media development and communication policies in a historical context.  Students will (1) Explore the technical, political-economic, and cultural approaches that have influenced the emergence and growth of electronic media (2) Broadly examine their social force and (3) Historically situate difference electronic forms such as the telegraph, telephone, broadcast radio/television, satellites, video-cassette recorders, cable TV, digital media, and emerging Information Technologies like the Internet.  Students must have a valid OIT account in order to participate in WebCT assignments.  Requirements include:  Exams, Quizzes, Discussion Section Attendance, and Group WebCT Project.  COMM 222 highly recommended.  PLEASE NOTE:  This course formerly numbered and titled COMM 234-History of Electronic Media--students who have already taken COMM 234 cannot take this course. (Course capacity is 125 Total/5 discussions @25)

COMM 494P:  SEMINAR-ADVANCED POPULAR CULTURE
Section  Number  Meeting Times   Building Room Number  Instructor
1  501298  TUTH 1.00-2.15       HENDERSON,L.
Lecture, discussion.  This course emphasizes meaning-making and community and institutional practice in popular cultural production and consumption.  Topics will include, for example, popular images of family life, questions of celebrity, the social and cultural bases of taste, and relationships between commercial, independent, non-commercial and activist sectors of cultural production.  Substantial reading, writing and classroom engagement are required.  For Senior COMM majors. (Course capacity is 20.)

COMM 497H: SPECIAL TOPIC-IMAGINARY RELATIONSHIPS WITH THE MEDIA
Section  Number  Meeting Times   Building Room Number  Instructor
1  566419  TUTH 11.15-12.30       NELSON,C.
Lecture, discussion. This is a fully enriched Honors course for 3 Honors credits. The focus of this course will be on the imaginary relationships people develop with media celebrities but some consideration will also be paid to the imaginary relationships audiences experience with their television and radio sets. In considering all this, we will more specifically examine the way these relationships are encouraged and even pursued through the stimulation and initiation of imagined interactions. We will also examine the social and psychological effects of these imaginary interactions and relationships, and attempt to make conclusions about current culture by analyzing the qualities of the celebrities with whom we imagine relationships and interactions. This course will differ from regular courses in that you will be asked to do a bit more reading than normal, and you will be involved in actual research, such as the video-taping and analysis of people watching (and interacting with) television and its host of characters--an activity that will occur both in and outside of class.  (Course capacity is 20)

COMM 497K:  SPECIAL TOPIC-POLTICAL ECONOMY OF MEDIA
Section  Number  Meeting Times Building Room Number  Instructor
1  566433  MWF 10.10       PAREDES,M
Lecture, discussion.  What is political economy and how can it be applied to the study of media?  This course is designed to introduce undergraduate students to studies that examine in depth the political economy of media.  Topics will range from media ownership and control patterns to the role of the government in media economics.  We will also examine the role or trade relations in formation of transnational communication industries and new media sectors.  Students are expected to attend all class sessions, participate in course discussions, conduct research projects and perform student presentations.  Requirements include:  Journals, In-Class assignments, Midterm Paper, and Final Research Project.  (Course capacity is 125 Total/5 discussions @25)

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE
COMLIT 383  NARRATIVE AVANT-GARDE FILM
Section  Number   Meeting Times  Building Room Number  Instructor
LEC 1  499604   M 3.35-19.00  HERT 231   LEVINE,D.
DIS 1  499611   TU 2.30-3.45
DIS 2  499618   TU 4.00-5.15
DIS 3  499625   W 2.30-3.45
DIS 4  499632   TU 19.00-20.15
Lecture, discussion.  Explores modern origin of experimentation in film in avant-garde modes such as Expressionism, Surrealism and contemporary results of this heritage.  Trying to determine if film is the most resolutely modern of the media.  Emphasis on the ways in which Avant-garde films can problematize themselves through the ploys of telling a story.  By means of a self-consciousness of story-telling which undermines viewer identification, the drive for closure, the demand for origins and order, and even cause and effect, these avant-garde films restore to playfulness its strength and ambiguity.  Requirements: one 5 page paper for midterm, final paper or project;
attendance.

COMLIT 383H NARRATIVE AVANT-GARDE FILM  4CR
Section  Number  Meeting Times  Building Room Number   Instructor
LEC 1  565957  M 3.35-19.00  HERT 231    LEVINE,D.
DIS 1  565964  TU 2.30-5.30
See above for general course description.  Students in COMLIT 383H may also register for COMLIT H01, a one-credit, optional, hands-on component.  The purpose is to investigate aspects of film (such as shot formation, camera movement, editing approaches).  Students will collaboratively explore a range of expressive possibilities on video.  Working in groups of four, students will alternate roles of creator/writer, camera-person, editor, etc., in constructing brief scenes.  No experience necessary.

COMLIT 391B FRENCH FILM
Section  Number  Meeting Times  Building Room Number  Instructor
LEC 1  499695  W 2.30-5.30 HERT 231   PORTUGES,C. & SCHWARTZWALD,R.
DIS 1  499702  TH 9.30
DIS 2  499709  TH 11.15
DIS 3  499716  TH 1.00
DIS 4  566097  TH 2.30
Weekly film and video screenings, lecture, and discussion sections. A survey of styles, schools, and genres in French cinema, emphasizing works from the New Wave forward, and with special attention to younger contemporary filmmakers. Formal, stylistic, institutional, social, and ideological aspects of these film practices in relation to their antecedents in the French film tradition and with respect to the diversity of French cinema, including the tradition de qualité, the heritage film, the blockbuster, the polar, cinéma vérité, cinéma direct, cinéma du look, and the “return to the real.” Discussion of the politics of remakes and of transnational co-production. All films in French with English subtitles. Course packet; textbooks. Requirements: Mandatory attendance at lectures and discussion sections; a combination of short quizzes, response papers, and a research paper developed through the semester. A one credit Honors colloquium conducted in French is offered by arrangement as a supplement to the course. Cross-listed with FRENCH 350

COMLIT 695A  INTERNATIONAL FILM NOIR
Section  Number  Meeting Times  Building Room Number  Instructor
1  500080  W 2.30-18.30       LEVINE,D.
Lecture.  Often referred to as the only indigenous American film style,”film noir” in its very appellation reveals that its major effects (for certain modern conceptions of cinema) lay elsewhere. We will examine film noir in its American heyday (1945-1957) and how it came to be a major propelling force in the new European cinema of the 1960’s ( Godard, and the Cahiers du Cinema).  How film noir displaces American social mores and their constitution of ‘reality’ within the imaginary and symbolic fields, and within the symptomatic concretization of those fields that is normative (dominant) cinema.  How film nior both makes film different and allows already latent difference to be manifested.  How film noir takes shape in the U.S. as expression of the inexpressible (and the ‘unheimlich’) or, at least, of the allusion to it; which in the lens and on the screen of directors such as Godard and Fassbinder becomes pseudomorphic, presenting a critique of American imperialism both public (political) and private (psychic) – the American way of death and love (or as the title of one work would have it, Love and Napalm: Export USA).  Films by:  American directors such as Aldritch, Ray, Fuller, Kubrick, Welles; foreign agents such as Lang, Ophuls, Siodmark, Sirk, Von Sternberg; European directors such as Godard, Fassbinder, Wenders.  Prerequisite:  2 prior film courses or consent of instructor.

Related Comparative Lit courses
COMLIT 236 DIGITAL CULTURE
Section  Number  Meeting Times  Building Room Number  Instructor
LEC 1  499520  MW 2.30  HERT 227   DIENES,L
DIS 1  499527  W 3.35
DIS 2  499534  W 4.25
DIS 3  499541  W 3.35
DIS 4  499548  W 4.25
Lecture, discussion.  Note: Only students with a valid UMass OIT computer account will be admitted.  An introduction to the cyber age and its cyber arts.  Designed especially for ``humanists" (but also aimed at science and engineering undergraduates), it is a humanistic, non-technical look at computers, technology and the emerging new digital culture, and the meaning of it all.  We will ask: what do this new tool (the computer) and this new medium (cyberspace) mean for the non-scientific world, for everyday life, for social and political ``digital empowerment," but especially for literature and the arts? and we will address areas such as: (1) ``digital culture," referring to actual works of art (in literature, painting, video, photography, film, music, performance art, design, etc.) created in the digital medium, and the implications of nonlinear ``hypertext" (``hypermedia") both for artistic creativity, and for the theory and criticism of the arts, especially literature; and (2) ``digital culture" in its general meaning of an emerging new civilization: the social, political, economic, psychological, philosophical, and even religious implications of the digital revolution, i.e., the larger context in which the new digital arts are born and evolve.  Prerequisites: none, except a current UMass OIT computer account.  Requirements: course project (digital or traditional), presentations, and quizzes.  Class size limited to 120.

121H INTERNATIONAL SHORT STORY: FICTION AND FILM
Section  Number  Meeting Times Building Room Number Instructor
1  499268  MWF 10.10
2  499275 MWF 11.15
Lecture, discussion.  A  course for students who really love to read, discuss and write about fiction.  An interest in film and in writing stories is also a plus!  We'll think about, talk about, and write about how stories are told.  We'll look at the language, the voice, the ``texture" of a story, the choices the writer has made, the way the writer uses the reader – draws us in, subverts our expectations.  We'll look at the particular way this happens in short fiction where economy and brevity are essential.  We'll look at the particular way(s) this happens in cinematic stories.  Stories by a wide variety of writers from the U.S.  and around the world:  Oates, Chekhov, Carver, Yamamoto, Butler, Silko, Achebe, Tan,  Cisneros,  Alexie, Angelou, Kincaid, Conrad, O'Brien, Kafka, and Kundera.  As we read stories and screen films, we will be partners in exploring what these many texts have to say and the ways they go about doing it.  I will give presentations and background.  However, the substance of the course is what you, the students, make of class discussion.  We will use  a variety of approaches so that you are all active, involved participants in the course, for example:  get together to discuss outside class in pairs or in groups of 3 or 4; be responsible, in pairs, for prompting class discussion; prepare short creative writings related to the day's readings.  Writing assignments:  6 short (one page)  summaries of readings on the genre of the short story or short responses to a text, , two 3-4 page papers, 1 creative writing assignment; occasional in-class writing and written preparation for class.  Final essay exam will take place during class time.  Weighting of grades: 50% class participation, 50% papers, final essay exam.

COMPUTER SCIENCE
CMPSCI 551 THREE-DIMENSIONAL ANIMATION AND DIGITAL EDITING     3CR
(Same as EDUC 591O)
Section   Number     Meeting Times      Building        Room Number       Instructor
1             497651     TH 19.00-20.30        WOOLF, B.
This seminar is dedicated to the production of high quality 3-dimensional computer animation using graphics technology. For example, color 3-D objects are defined and manipulated, digitized images created and altered, and photo-realistic effects and animated sequences produced. Techniques are used to bend and twist shapes around objects or lines, to provide a variety of light and texture, and to trace over images including digitized pictures. The course is directed at production of an informative and approachable ten minute 3-dimensional animated piece. Using computer-generated graphical analogies as well as cartoon caricature, the video is designed to educate and entertain. The class does not have lab facilities for all students interested in this material and thus we limit the class to students who do well on the first assignment. This assignment will be graded and returned to students before the end of the Add/Drop period. Students are cordially invited to attend the first class, the first Tuesday/Thursday of the semester. At that time we will explain the course, what is expected of students and the entry condition. Prereq: contact instructor to add course.  Enrollment at discretion of instructor.

CMPSCI 552 INTERACTIVE MULTIMEDIA PRODUCTION  also EDUC 591L
Section  Number   Meeting Times   Building Room Number  Instructor
1  497665   TUTH 5.30-18.45       WOOLF,B.
This course explores the potential of high quality interactive authoring tools to develop presentation and training systems. Programming languages within professional presentation and editing packages will be used to create systems capable of presenting graphics, animation, text, sound and music, based on the users requests. Students will learn how to define and manipulate classical techniques such as storyboarding, staging, and interactivity. The course will concentrate on state-of-the-art multimedia composition and presentation techniques and developing small individual projects. The class does not have lab facilities for all students interested in this material and thus we limit the class to students who do well on the first assignment. This assignment will be graded and returned to students before the end of the Add/Drop period. Students are cordially invited to attend the first class, the first Tuesday/Thursday of the semester. At that time we will explain the course, what is expected of students and the entry condition. Prerequisite: CMPSCI 551 (591x) - 3D Computer Animation and Digital Editing. Permission of the instructor required; contact: Beverly Woolf 545-4265. 3 credits.

EDUCATION
EDUC 505 DOCUMENTARY FILMMAKING FOR EDUCATION
Section  Number  Meeting Times  Building Room Number  Instructor
1  507570  W 4.00-18.30  FURC 21B   BRANDON,L.
This is an introductory course providing practical filmmaking experience for educators and others who wish to document their research, interests, programs, and educational endeavors.  Emphasis will be on making super-8mm films using live-action photography and film editing techniques.  Students complete two shor t documentary projects during the semester.

EDUC 539 USING FILM AND VIDEO IN EDUCATION
Section  Number  Meeting Times  Building Room Number   Instructor
1  507738  TU 4.00-18.30  FURC 21B    BRANDON,L.
This course is designed to examine the visual, psychological, and technical methods used by filmmakers to convey their messages, to explore and encourage the use of creative and relevant films and videos in educational and other settings, and to suggest a variety of techniques for structuring and integrating film and video in education.  A wide variety of films and videos will be shown and their potential for use will be explored.  Emphasis will be on developing critical, aesthetic, and social media awareness, examining stereotyping and sex roles in the cinema, facilitating productive and open-ended discussions, and evaluating, scheduling, and screening films and videos.

EDUC 591L  INT MULTIMEDIA PRODUCTION
See COMPSCI 552

EDUC 591O  SEM – CHARACTER ANIMATION
See COMPSCI 551

ENGLISH Related Course only
ENGL 491B  FICTION AND FILM OF THE AMERICAN WEST
Section  Number  Meeting Times  Building Room Number  Instructor
1  565047  TUTH 1.00-2.15      NOLAND,R
A study of the rise and fall of the Western hero, and of the frontier myth of a collision between civilization and savagery.  Texts will include John Cawelti’s The Six-Gun Mystique Sequel and such novels as Owen Wister’s The Virginian, Frederick Manfred’s Lord Grizzly, Harvey Fergusson’s Wolfsong, Dorothy M. Johnson’s Buffalo Woman, Zane Grey’s Riders of the Purple Sage, Jack Schaefer’s Shane, and Corman McCarthy’s All the Pretty Horses.  Films (time permitting):  My Darling Clementine, High Noon, Shane, Red River, The Searchers, Unforgiven, Lone Star.  Requirements: Class reports, several papers during the semester, a final paper.  PREREQ: ENGL 200 AND GENED=CW

FRENCH
FRENCH 350 FRENCH FILM  Conducted in English; no knowledge of French required
Section  Number   Meeting Times  Building Room Number  Instructor
LEC 1  518602   W 2.30-5.30  HERT 231   SCHWARTZWALD;PORTUGES
DIS 1  518609   TH 9.30
DIS 2  518616  TH 11.15
DIS 3  518623   TH 1.00
DIS 4  565901   TH 2.30
See description for COMLIT 391B.  A one credit Honors colloquium conducted in French is offered by arrangement as a supplement to the course.

GERMAN
GERMAN 304 FRM BERLIN-HOLLYWOOD 3 CR  TAUGHT IN ENGLISH
Section   Number        Meeting Times         Building       Room Number    Instructor
LEC 1     520240  TUTH 1:00-2:15              BYG, B.
LAB 1  520247  W        18:00-22:00   Herter          227           BYG, B.
Lecture, discussion. From Caligari and Metropolis to Run, Lola, Run, films from Germany have had great international influence, particularly on popular culture of the United States. Survey of prewar German cinema, including the great directors who emigrated to the U.S., such as Lang and Murnau. Then the successors to the Golden Age will be discussed: the Nazi cinema, postwar cinema in both German states, the recent ``second Americanization" of German film. Midterm, final, short papers. Film screenings outside class time.

HONORS  Related Courses only
HONORS 292W AMERICA AT WAR  THIS IS A 4-CREDIT HONORS SEMINAR.
Section  Number  Meeting Times     Building Room Number  Instructor
1  522914  TUTH 4.00-5.15, TU 19.00-22.00  DKSN 109   DOW,R
2  522921  W 3.35-18.00, TU 19.00-22.00    DKSN 109   DOW,R.
292W Lecture 1:  Keeping as our primary concern the viewpoint of the individual as he/she journeys through the landscape of war and his/her memory of that experience, we will examine WWI, WWII, and Vietnam.  It is through literature, history and film that this course explores the nature of war.  Using these mediums we will examine the experience of the individual during wartime, of those who engaged in battle as well as those who did not.  We will ask, how do war stories and films influence our values and attitudes about war?  How do these stories make us think and feel?  It is in this light that we will discuss the historical and political aspects and, as Kurtz so succinctly puts it in Heart of Darkness, ``the horror of war."  The readings include the fiction of Hemingway, Heller, and O'Brien, the non-fiction of Fussell and Herr, and selected readings from oral histories.  The films of Kubrick, Peterson, Coppola and others will be discussed critically in conjunction with the reading assignments.
292W, Lecture 2 and H03 – America at War: Community Service Learning
COMMUNITY SERVICE LEARNING SEMINAR.  STUDENTS MUST ALSO ENROLL IN HONORS H03.

HONORS 292C CONTEMPORARY READINGS:  AMERICAN POP CULTURE  3CR
THIS IS A 3-CREDIT HONORS SEMINAR. COMMONWEALTH COLLEGE LEARNING COMMUNITY. REGISTRATION AVAILABLE ONLY DURING SUMMER ORIENTATION.
Section Number  Meeting Times   Building Room Number  Instructor
1  522781  TUTH 9.30-10.45       MARSHALL,B.
This course will address the relationship between contemporary popular culture and our daily lives.  We will examine a range of popular cultural forms, such as television, film, music videos, shopping malls, and theme parks, in order to understand the ways in which cultural meanings, identities, and values are produced and negotiated in contemporary American society.  Special attention will be given to questions of gender, race, ethnicity, and sexuality.  This course will include regular film and video screenings, assigned readings, and written assignments.  Commonwealth College Learning Community for FAL02, Registration available only during summer orientation.

HONORS 292M METAPHOR&CREATIVITY  3CR
CONTACT HONORS OFFICE-504 GOODELL TO ADD SECTION. COMMONWEALTH COLLEGE LEARNING COMMUNITY. REGISTRATION AVAILABLE ONLY DURING SUMMER ORIENTATION.
Section Number  Meeting Times       Building Room Number  Instructor
1  522844  TUTH 5.30-18.45, TU 19.00-22.00    DKSN 109   DOW,R.
This course will explore the uses of metaphor in literature and film.  The course will include a deep analysis of the short story, the novel and drama, as well as two feature length dramatic films and a documentary film.  We will examine these works in terms of creative/metaphorical strategy and purpose.  Purpose that is predominately based on structure and order.  In particular, we will study the ways in which metaphors work as the foundation for the creation of literary art.  We will examine this poetic metaphor in terms of structure and form.  As Stephen Dobyns and others note, “Structure is not only what allows the work to be complete in itself but also enables the work to be communicated and become a source of pleasure."

MUSIC
MUSIC 190F MUSIC IN FILMS
Section   Number  Meeting Times  Building Room Number Instructor
1  574749  TUTH   8:00-9:15         Herter               231 RIDEOUT, R
The aesthetics and dramatic techniques of film music since 1895.  Excerpts from commercial silent era and sound films viewed and studied as examples of film music development and the composer's art. Students will construct two soundtracks for specific scenes. No special skills or prerequisites required.

MUSIC 190H MUSIC IN FILM 3CR HONORS STUDENTS ONLY.
Commonwealth college learning community. Registration available only during Summer orientation. Section   Number Meeting Times   Building Room Number    Instructor
1             574763      TUTH 1.00-2.15            FAC             154              RIDEOUT,R
Honors section of the above. Two weeks of the course devoted to the music and film innovations of Citizen Kane. Students will complete a 5-10 page paper on some technical aspect of that film.

LEGAL STUDIES
LEGAL 397X  MEDIA CENSORSHIP
Section  Number  Meeting Times  Building Room Number  Instructor
LEC 1  527786  TUTH 1.00-2.15      BROOKS,D.
LAB 1  527793  M 4.00-18.00  HAS 134   BROOKS,D.
This course will examine the regulation of film content. The course will focus not only on legal regulation, i.e. obscenity law, but will also focus on self-regulation particularly with respect to Hollywood and the hays
Office. The course will also examine the regulation based on political content, for example during the McCarthy period. The course will also examine regulation of political content in foreign films and in documentary films. There will be weekly screenings of film with discussions following the screenings.

Related Legal Studies courses:
LEGAL 491M  ART AND COPYRIGHT
Section  Number  Meeting Times   Building Room Number  Instructor
1  561197  TUTH 11.15-12.30       BROOKS,D.
This course will examine conflicts surrounding ownership of artistic works.  We use examples from all major genres including fine art painting, literature, music, dance, opera and film and will therefore also be taking a more or less historical and critical approach. There will be quizzes, written work, a group project and a final individual project. This course is not open to freshmen.

LEGAL 497P ST-LAW IN THE MEDIA
Section  Number  Meeting Times   Building Room Number  Instructor
1  527989  TUTH 9.30-10.45       GAITENBY,A
This course explores the relationship between law and media.  How does media portray law?  Is this portrayal accurate?  How does the picture presented by ``alternative" media differ?  This course includes an Honors lab, in conjunction with WMUA FM91, in which students will gain practical experience using professional digital production systems and be responsible for producing a 30-minute Public Affairs show to be broadcast on WMUA in Spring 2002.

POLITICAL SCIENCE
POLSCI 293A S-PLTC EUROPEAN FILM 3CR
Section   Number Meeting Times  Building Room Number     Instructor
1    559552 M 19:00-21:30  HAS  134        XENOS, N.
   T 1:00-2:15
The emergent spectacle of mass politics at the core of the struggle between revolution and reaction in twentieth-century Europe has its counterpart in the emergence of film as a key element in mass culture. The logic of revolution and reaction also played a role in the development of film as a cultural form. This course presents a series of films for discussion and analysis of revolution and reaction as political and aesthetic phenomena. Among the films that will be included are: Sergei Eisenstein's Potemkin, Jean Renoir's The Rules of the Game, Leni Riefenstahl's The Triumph of the Will, Roberto Rossellini's Open City, Gillo Pontecorvo's The Battle of Algiers, Jean-Luc Godard's Weekend, Bernardo Bertolucci's The Conformist, and Alain Tanner's La Salamandre and Jonah Who Will Be 25 in the Year 2000. Readings will be focused on the theoretical issues involved in interpreting these films. Assignments include short in-class analyses of each film and two 5-7 page essays.

SPANISH
SPAN 497A ST-SPANISH CINEMA: BUNUEL TO ALMODOVAR
Section  Number  Meeting Times   Building Room Number   Instructor
1  553203  TUTH 4.00-18.00        ORNELAS,J.
2  571172  TUTH 4.00-18.00
Analysis of ten films by some of the most important Spanish directors from the sixties to the nineties, with special attention to films by Buñuel and Almodóvar.  Some topics to be covered: representation of violence, repression, religion, gender, sexuality and transgression.  Credits can be used for the Certificate in Film Studies.  Several 1-2 page papers, a midterm exam, and a term paper.

SPORTS   Related Course ONLY
SPORTS 391B S-SPORTS BROADCASTNG 3CR
SPTMGT MAJORS ONLY. OTHERS BY PERMISSION OF INSTRUCTOR.
Section  Number    Meeting Times  Building Room Number   Instructor
1           553917       W 11.15-1.45                                                            MADSEN,D.
An introduction to the relationship between sports and broadcasting in American culture.  A survey of historic, economic, legal and technical aspects of broadcasting, including an investigation of audience research, selection of events, networks, and rights fees.  Phone #5-3971

THEATER  Related Course ONLY
THEATR 345- DIRECTING   THEATER MAJORS ONLY.
CONTACT INSTRUCTOR TO ADD COURSE. PREREQ: THEATR 140.
Section  Number    Meeting Times  Building Room Number     Instructor
1  556143        MW  10:10-1:10  RAND           UPPR          MCCAULEY, G.
 
 
 
AMHERST COLLEGE

AMHERST COLLEGE

ANTHROPOLOGY 41  VISUAL ANTHROPOLOGY
T TH 10:00 - 11:20 + Professor Gewertz
This course will explore and evaluate various visual genres, including photography, ethnographic film and museum presentation as modes of anthropological analysis–as media of communication facilitating cross-cultural understanding.  Among the topics to be examined are the ethics of observation, the politics of artifact collection and display, the dilemma of representing non-Western “others” through Western media, and the challenge of interpreting indigenously produced visual depictions of “self” and “other.”

ENGLISH 19  FILM AND WRITING
TTh 11:30 - 12:50   + Professor Barr
A first course in reading films and writing about them.  A varied selection of films for study and criticism, partly to illustrate the main elements of film language and partly to pose challenging texts for reading and writing.  Frequent short papers.  Two 90-minute class meetings and two screenings per week.

ENGLISH 82F  PRODUCTION WORKSHOP IN THE MOVING IMAGE
W 2-5 Five College Visiting Assistant Professor Miller.
An introductory course in the production and critical study of the moving image as an art form:  hands-on exercises with video camcorder and editing equipment, supplemented with screenings and critical reading.
Limited to 15 students.  Admission with consent of the instructor.  (Contact English Department before Registration.)

ENGLISH 84F TOPICS IN FILM STUDY
MW 2 - 03:20     Senior Lecturer von Schmidt.
The topic varies from year to year.  In fall 2002, the topic will be “The Romance.”  The romance, and the generic forms it has taken, in Hollywood and elsewhere:  classical romance, melodrama, screwball comedy, romantic comedy, the musical.  How has the screen romance variously reflected and/or shaped our own attitudes?  We will look at examples representing a range of cultures and historical eras, from a range of critical positions. Two screenings per week.

Related Amherst courses:
GERMAN 61  DIGITAL CULTURES
MW 2 - 03:20    Professor Gilpin
This course examines the interactions between contemporary critical and cultural theory and digital cultures, addressing issues of identity construction, gender, corporeal vs. psychic presence, interactivity, bodily motion and motion capture, community, interface, performativity, duration, and representation.  We will be looking at work produced internationally, and will focus our attention on interactive projects created in Germany, where a tremendous amount of new media works have been created recently.  We will also explore material from websites and from recent international symposia and exhibitions of electronic art, and view a number of films.  Readings will be drawn from theoretical, literary, philosophical, psychoanalytic, and architectural texts, as well as from multimedia-authoring texts, exhibition catalogs, and international cybermagazines.  Students will develop and produce projects involving text, still and moving image, and sound, in digital format.  No previous experience with computers is required.  Conducted in English, with German majors required to do a substantial portion of the reading in German. Limited to 15 students.
 
 
HAMPSHIRE COLLEGE

HAMPSHIRE COLLEGE

HACU 108 INTRODUCTION TO MEDIA PRODUCTION: PHOTOGRAPHY AND VIDEO
Thursday 12:30-3:20 PM Open enrollment Library Studio and Classroom  Matthew Soar
This course is an introductory media production course that will focus primarily on photography and video. Over the course of the semester students will learn to think about and look critically at the still and moving image, to explore each medium in challenging and imaginative ways, and to gain experience in pre-production, production and post-production techniques. Projects are designed to develop basic technical proficiency in video and photography, to explore the principles, possibilities and limitations of each medium, and to develop the necessary working skills and mental discipline so important to a successful working process. Final production projects will experiment with established media genres. Writing assignments, in class critiques and discussion will focus on media analysis and image/sound relationships. Students will be required to keep a visual journal, to conduct field assignments, and to attend film screenings outside of class. A $50 lab fee provides access to equipment and editing facilities. Students are responsible for providing their own film, tape, processing and supplies. 16 limit.

HACU 109 INTRODUCTION TO MEDIA ARTS: PHOTOGRAPHY AND THE WEB
Tuesday, 12:30-3:20  PFB Classroom     Jacqueline Hayden
We will explore specific problems related to the descriptive properties of photography as a medium reflective of reality in its digital vs. analog forms out of which students will be developing a disciplined and informed creative process.  It is expected that students will self generate projects of their interest while developing their authorial voice. Technical components of the media arts will be taught to include: basic black and white photography including developing film and printing, camera work, lighting, composition, scanning and web design.  There will be bi-weekly assignments. The development of a foundation in critical analysis and visual literacy in the media arts will be stressed through readings and viewing both historical and contemporary works in photography, film, video and web-based works along with attending presentations by visiting artists.  There are weekly 2-hour labs and visiting artist presentations.

HACU 110  FILM/VIDEO WORKSHOP I
Wednesday 2:30-5:20 PFB classroom  Baba Hillman
This course teaches the basic skills of film production, including camera work, editing, sound recording, and preparation and completion of a finished work in film or video. Students will have weekly assignments, and will also produce a finished film for the class. There will be weekly screenings of student work, as well as screening of films and videotapes which represent a variety of aesthetic approaches to the moving image. Finally, the development of personal vision will be stressed. The bulk of the work in the class will be produced in 16mm format. Video formats plus digital image processing and non-linear editing will also be introduced. A $50 lab fee provides access to equipment and editing facilities. Students are responsible for providing their own film, tape, processing and supplies.There are weekly evening screenings or workshops.

HACU 111 STILL PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOP I
M 2:30-5:20 PFB classroom  Robert Seydel
This course emphasizes three objectives: first, the acquisition of basic photographic skills, including composition, exposure, processing, and printing; second, familiarity with historical and contemporary movements in photography and the development of visual literacy; third, the deepening and expanding of a personal way of seeing.  Students will have weekly shooting and printing assignments and, in addition, will complete a portfolio by the end of the semester.  A $50 lab fee is charged for this course.  The lab fee provides access to darkroom facilities, laboratory supplies and chemicals, and special equipment and materials.  Students must provide their own film, paper, and cameras.

HACU 112  VIDEO I
Time and instructor TBA
This intensive course will introduce students to basic video production techniques for both location and studio work.  Over the course of the semester students will gain experience in pre-production, production and post-production techniques as well as learn to think and look critically about the making of the moving image.  Projects are designed to develop basic technical proficiency in the video medium as well as the necessary working skills and mental discipline so important to a successful working process.  No one form or style will be stressed, though much in-field work will be assigned.  Students will be introduced to both digital editing with Adobe Premiere and analog editing using 3/4" decks and an Editmaster system.  There will be weekly screenings of films and vide tapes that represent a variety of stylistic approaches.    Students will work on projects and exercises in rotation crews throughout the term. Final production projects will experiment with established media genres. In-class critiques and discussion will focus on media analysis and image/sound relationships.  (Lab fee $50)

HACU 124T CONTEMPORARY NEW WAVES OF WORLD CINEMA
M W 1030-1150/M 630-930 pm  FPH 101  Eva Rueschmann
This course offers a view of the richness and diversity of contemporary world cinemasÐthe influence of 1960s New Waves on contemporary European film, new Latin American cinemas, sub-Saharan film, the Chinese Fifth Generation, India\'s Bollywood, Hong Kong and Australasian works, and the new Iranian cinema. We will focus on the narrative tradition in feature filmmaking, examining cinematic styles, authorship, genre, and politics of representation as they have developed in different parts of the globe. Readings in film history and theory will contextualize our discussions of individual films. Major emphasis in this course will be placed on critical writing and revision, including close analyses of film aesthetics as well as the political and cultural dimensions of contemporary world cinema. Additional weekly screenings will be scheduled.

HACU 126T HAMPSHIRE FILMS
W 1030-1150/F 9-1150  PFB Class  Abraham Ravett
The objective of this course is to introduce nonfiction film and video practice to a group of 12 incoming students. Through a combination of screenings, lectures, readings, and technical workshops, we will explore a critical/historical overview of this genre and incorporate our knowledge and experience into several cinematic profiles chosen by members of the class. Additional weekly screenings will be scheduled. There is a lab fee for this course.

HACU 188 FRACTURED VISION AND CONSTRUCTED REALITIES:  THE HISTORY OF MONTAGE IN PHOTOGRAPHY AND FILM
MW 4-5:20  FPH 104  Melissa Johnson
Montage, in both its photographic and filmic formats, has had an enormous impact on how we perceive and respond to the world around us. In this course we will explore the history of montage, tracking how vision has become progressively fractured as society has become increasingly modernized, and how artists have constructed their own visual/virtual realities. By looking at late 19th Century origins of montage, twentieth century strategies of Dadaist, Surrealist and Constructivist photomontage, and, American and western and eastern European filmic montage we will explore how artists, filmmakers, and graphic designers have used montage to “hit the spectator like a bullet”, provoking an active response on the part of the observer. Discussion will focus on both the practice and theory of montage, and will explore issues of sexuality, identity, politics, and consumerism and mass culture.

HACU 210 FILM/VIDEO WORKSHOP II
TH 9-11:50 Abraham Ravett
This course emphasizes developing skills in 16mm filmmaking. The course will cover the basics of 16mm sound-synch including pre-planning (scripting or storyboarding), cinematography, sound recording, editing and post production finishing.  Students will be expected to complete individual projects as well as participate in group exercises. Reading and writing about critical issues is an important part of the course and students will be expected to complete one analytical essay.  Workshops in animation, optical printing, video editing, digital imaging and audio mixing will be offered throughout the semester.  Students are expected to attend these workshops as well as attend screenings of seminal film and video works in documentary, narrative and experimental genres.   A $50 lab fee entitles students to use camera and recording equipment, transfer and editing facilities, plus video and computer production and post-production equipment. Students must purchase their own film and pay their own processing fees. Required screenings and workshops often occur in the evening. In general Film/VideoWorkshop I will be considered a prerequisite.

HACU 212  VIDEO II: WRITING FOR VIDEO, FILM AND NEW MEDIA
TH 12:30-3:20  FPH 102 Baba Hillman
This production/theory class for video and film concentrators will introduce students to scripts and texts by independent filmmakers, videomakers and new media artists working in essayist, poetic, fictional and documentary modes and in hybrid combinations of these modes.  Using Scott MacDonald’s “Screen Writings” and Janet H. Murray’s  “Hamlet on the Holodeck: The Future of the Narrative in Cyberspace” as primary texts, the course will consider the work of Kristin Lucas, Yvonne Rainer, James Benning, Yoko Ono, Su Friedrich, Trinh T. Minha, William Greaves, Chris Marker, Jacques Rivette, Hollis Frampton, and Bill Seaman.  Students will write and shoot two short projects on video and will write and shoot a longer final project. The course will include assignments in writing for spoken text, concentrating on voice-over and dialogue, and assignments in writing for visual text for the screen, web, and media installation.

HACU 280  THINKING THROUGH VIDEO
M 9-11:50 PFB classroom  Matt Soar
This course is intended for students who are already committed to video as a medium of personal expression, including artistic, experimental, non-narrative, narrative, and documentary approaches (and all points in between). It is also intended as a reading-, writing- and discussion-intensive course, so it will be best suited to students who are especially interested in developing their working processes through a "theory-fix." We will interrogate our own video-making practices by drawing on current ideas in critical cultural studies (about, for example, subjectivity and representation) and by viewing contemporary works that may serve to challenge our preconceptions about the medium. There will be elements of self-directed study and intensive video production work later in the course, informed by some of the ideas and concepts encountered earlier in the semester. Students may bring works-in-progress to class or use the opportunity to begin a fresh project. The class will begin with a review of students' past efforts.  Prerequisites: Students must have a working understanding of basic video production techniques, and have taken an intro class to media and/or cultural studies.  A $50 lab fee provides access to equipment and editing facilities. Students are responsible for providing their own film, tape, processing and supplies.

HACU 310   ADVANCED SEMINAR IN FILM/PHOTOGRAPHY/VIDEO
W 6:30-9:20  PFB classroom  Robert Seydel
This course is open to film, photography, and video concentrators in Division III and others by consent of the instructor.  The class will integrate the procedural and formal concentration requirements of the College with the creative work produced by each student.  It will offer a forum for meaningful criticism, exchange, and exposure to each other.  In addition, written assignments and a variety of readings by artists and others will be given that are intended to relate to the development and enunciation of each student‚s formal and contextual concerns as they are expressed in their Division III projects, including artist‚s statements, autobiographies of visual life, and the construction of a multi-faceted Collectanea.  There will be a $50 lab fee.  Enrollment is limited to Division III concentrators; contracts must have been filed prior to enrollment.  All others must have permission of the instructor.

Related Hampshire courses:
HACU/IA 218  LIVING NOW/ LIFE IN THE VALLEY
W 9-11:50 Jacqueline Hayden and Michael Lesy
A course for intermediate non-fiction writers and documentary photographers. Writers and photographers will learn from each other by: (1) attending writing and photo critiques together (2) reading such texts as THE HEART OF THE WORLD (3) studying the work of such photographers as Walker Evans (4) working in pairs to produce articles. These articles will be posted monthly on a magazine website to be maintained by members of the class.  The course's online magazine will chronicle the lives of people who live and work in the Valley, from Greenfield to Hartford. Every kind of scene and situation, every kind of person in every kind of circumstance may be portrayed.   Instructor Permission: photographers, by portfolio review, on the first day of class; writers, by writing exercise given on the first day of class.
 
 
 
MOUNT HOLYOKE COLLEGE

MOUNT HOLYOKE COLLEGE

NOTE: Most courses have additional screening times; some courses require prerequisites and/or have limited enrollments.  Please check the course catalogue and supplement for more information.  For information on the Film Studies Program at Mount Holyoke, please call 538-2200, or visit the Film Studies Program website at www.mtholyoke.edu/acad/film.

ANTHROPOLOGY 316  VISUAL ANTHROPOLOGY
TTh 1:15-2:30  D. Battaglia

ART 110F  INTRODUCTORY SEMINAR IN ART HISTORY FILMS IN THE AURA OF ART
OPEN to MHC 1st YEAR STUDENTS ONLY!   4 credits
M 1:15-4:50, W 1:15-2:30 screening P. Staiti
The best films of the past century have commanded our attention and imagination in part because of their artistry and the way they tell stories visually. This seminar closely examines a selection of those films from around the world that can be considered serious art and understood as events taking place in particular cultures. Among them are Broken Blossoms, Battleship Potemkin, Citizen Kane, Le Mépris, The Bicycle Thief, Days of Heaven, Ugetsu, Woman in the Dunes, The Marriage of Maria Braun, and Rear Window.

CRITICAL SOCIAL THOUGHT 360F THE TERROR OF POLITICS: SOCIAL CRITICISM IN CONTEMPORARY EUROPEAN FILM
W 1:00-3:50 H. Teschke 4 credits
This seminar explores relations between art and politics in major European films of the post-war era. Our guiding premise will follow Jean Luc Godard's statement: "The problem is not how to make political films, but rather how to make films political." We will discuss this problem in light of economic, political, and aesthetic controversies from the beginning of the Cold War to the present. Directors considered include Jean Luc Godard, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Volker Scholoendorff, Konrad Wolf, and the Dogma Group.  Enrollment Limit: 18

ECONOMICS 100F  INTRO ECONOMICS TOPIC: ECONOMICS IN POPULAR FILM
MHC 1st YEAR STUDENTS ONLY
MW 1:15-2:30, M 7-10pm screening S. Gabriel   4 credits
An introduction to political economy and economic analysis using a wide range of popular films as the object of analysis. For example, students will view A Respectable Trade and discuss the economics of slavery. The basic goal of the course is to provide theoretical tools for applying economic analysis in understanding both historical events and processes and more contemporary issues. See http://www.mtholyoke.edu/courses/sgabriel/filmcourse.html for a more detailed description. Enrollment Limit: 15

ENGLISH 345F  Studies in American Literature HENRY JAMES INTO FILM
W 1:00 – 3:50   D. Weber 4 credits
This seminar will examine the various screen adaptations of assorted novels by Henry James. We will read the novels against the films, exploring how James's texts translate--or do not translate--into film. Novels and films to be studied include Washington Square, The Europeans, Portrait of a Lady, The Turn of the Screw, and Wings of the Dove. Enrollment Limit: 15

FILM STUDIES 201F   INTRODUCTION TO FILM
MW 1:15-2:30, M 2:30-4:50 screening  R. Blaetz  4 credits
This course teaches the basic concepts and critical skills involved in interpreting film. Through lecture, reading, discussion, and screening of films both in and outside of class, the student will become a more informed and sophisticated observer of the cinema. During the first half of the semester, the class will study form and style in narrative film as well as in nonnarrative practices such as avant-garde and documentary filmmaking. For the remainder of the course, the class will examine some of the major critical approaches in the field.

FILM STUDIES 210F PRODUCTION WORKSHOP/MOVING IMAGE
TU 1-3:50, M 7-10 screening A. Steuernagel
This course will focus on the production and critical study of the moving image using video equipment. Included are hands-on exercises with video camcorder and editing facilities, as well as screenings and critical reading. Contact the film studies program before registration. Enrollment Limit: 15

FILM STUDIES 260  GENRE: THE SCIENCE FICTION FILM
MW 11-12:15, TU 7:30-10 screening R. Blaetz 4 credits
This course explores various manifestations of the science fiction film as it has appeared from the beginning of film history. Examples include the early "magic" films of Melies and Clair, as well as the numerous examples of the genre from the 1950s, and more contemporary films such as 2001and Videodrome. The course traces the formal and thematic history of the genre, with attention paid to the figuration of modern science, the evolution of social roles, the technological body, and postmodern representations of time and space.

FRENCH 120F FRENCH LITERATURE AND CINEMA
MHC 1st YEAR STUDENTS ONLY
TUTH 2:40-3:55  S. Hull 4 credits
The classic stories of French literature are frequently the inspiration for new stories, whether in film or in new novels. Through adaptation, the stories are transformed, taking on the issues of another era and the characteristics of a new medium. In this course, we will explore adaptation, focusing on films and novels based on well-known French texts. Through a series of short papers and brief oral presentations, we will also emphasize critical analysis and the formation of a clear, well-presented and well-supported argument. Among the works we will discuss are Laclos' Dangerous Liaisons and Dumas' The Count of Monte Cristo.  Enrollment Limit: 10

GERMAN 100  GENDER BENDERS
MHC 1st YEAR STUDENTS ONLY
TUTH 2:40-3:55   E. Krimmer 4 credits
Cross-dressed soldiers and sailors, gender-bending pirates, spies, thieves, transvestite nuns, actresses in trousers’ parts, women who traveled in men’s clothing. This course traces the phenomenon of cross-dressing in history, literature, opera, and film from 1600 to the present. We will investigate the extraordinary lives of historical cross-dressers and analyze changes in the construction of gender from early to post-modernity.The material to be discussed includes texts by Shakespeare, Goethe, Balzac, Woolf, and Brecht; opera (Fidelio, Rosenkavalier); film of the Weimar Republic and contemporary German and Hollywood productions; autobiographies of cross-dressers.

GERMAN 310F GERMAN ROMANTICISM: the Search for Identity—Individual, Nation, Cosmos
MW 1:15-2:30   G. Davis  4 credits
Investigation of Romanticism as a cultural and social phenomenon in an era of political unrest. Discussion of such fundamental Romantic concepts and topics as irony, Poesie, Volk; the cult of night and death, gender roles, Salonkultur, nationalism, and myth as history and utopia. A particular focus on issues of identity and the unconscious, especially as relating to Kaspar Hauser, the mysterious foundling and Child of Europe. Postmodern literary and filmic reflections on the era. Texts by von Arnim, Günderrode, Rahel Varnhagen, the Grimms, Fouqué, Kleist, Fichte, Hoffmann, Schlegel, Novalis; Bachmann, Arendt, Freud. Films by von Trotta, Rohmer, Sehr, Herzog. Multimedia CD-ROM by G. Davis.

ITALIAN 215/315 CINEMA & LITERATURE: An Intertextual Apprch to Italian Culture & Society
MW 1:15-2:30 and one meeting unarranged  F. Santovetti  4 credits
215: This course looks at the participation of Italian writers and filmmakers in the public discussion of such controversial themes in modern Italian culture and society as diversity and sexual discrimination, the failure of Italian unification and the condition of the South, conformity and resistance to Fascism, the making of the modern hero/heroine, and the crisis of identity. Authors will include C. Levi, Sciascia, Brancati, Moravia, and Tarchetti; the directors Rosi, Amelio, Bolognini, Bertolucci, and Scola. Secondary readings on cultural studies, film theory, narratology, and script writing will also form part of the syllabus.
315:  Students enrolling in Italian 315 attend the class meetings of Italian 215 (see "Courses in Translation") and in addition must enroll in a one-hour tutorial, which is lecture/discussion in Italian. All work and readings are in Italian.
 
 
SMITH COLLEGE

SMITH COLLEGE

FLS 200 INTRODUCTION TO FILM STUDIES
Course Registration Number: 10536  Credits: 4
M W 01:10-02:30, M 07:30-09:30  Keller, Alexandra
An overview of cinema's historical development as an artistic and social force. Students will become familiar with the aesthetic elements of cinema (visual style, sound, narration and formal structure), the terminology of film production, and film theories relating to formalism, ideology, psychoanalysis and feminism. Films (both classic and contemporary) will be discussed from aesthetic, historical and social perspectives, enabling students to approach films as informed and critical viewers. Limited to 60.

FLS 241 GENRE/PERIOD: SCREEN COMEDY
Course Registration Number: 15143  Credits: 4
Meeting Times and location:    N/A
Topics course.: Lectures, with occasional discussion, on film comedies from a variety of places and times: American screwball comedies and British Ealing comedies; battles of the sexes; the silent or non-verbal comedy of Chaplin, Keaton, and Jacques Tati; parodies of other film genres; fast-talking comedy by the Marx Brothers, Monty Python, Woody Allen, and Howard Hawks; midsummer night’s dreams by Ingmar Bergman, Max Reinhardt and William Dieterle, and others. Readings in film criticism, film history, and the theory of comedy. Prerequisite: a college course in film or literature, or permission of the instructor.

FLS 280 INTRODUCTION TO VIDEO PRODUCTION AND THE HISTORY OF VIDEO ART
Course Registration Number: 14719  Credits: 4
Meeting Times:    T 01:00-04:50  Location: N/A
Video I is an introductory video production course. This class will introduce you to the history and contemporary practice of video art/documentary video and will provide you with the technical and conceptual skills to complete creative video projects in small groups and individually. Over the course of the semester, students will gain experience in pre-production, production and post-production techniques. Projects are designed to develop basic technical proficiency in the video medium as well as practical skills for the completion of the creative project. Prerequisite: 200 (which may be taken concurrently). Enrollment limited to 13.

FLS 281 VIDEO PRODUCTION WORKSHOP: NARRATIVE
Course Registration Number: 15124 Credits: 4
Meeting Times: M W 07:30-09:30 Location: N/A West, Justin
This course provides students with basic production skills (camera, lighting, sound, story structure, editing) with an emphasis on narrative. Course work includes both group and individual production projects in the context of a close study of narrative film technique. Each student will produce a short individual work. Prerequisite: 200. Enrollment limited to 16.

FLS 282 ADVANCED VIDEO PRODUCTION WORKSHOP
Course Registration Number: 15125 Credits: 4
Meeting Times: Th 01:00-05:00, W 07:30-09:30 Location: N/A  Benn, Janet
This course is designed to explore video as a creative medium of cinematic expression. Students with a solid understanding of basic video production will have an opportunity to work intensively with video in a seminar environment to explore advanced aspects of the medium. The course will make use of critique and the viewing and discussion of film and video works to give students an expanded understanding of the technical demands and creative potential of the medium. Students in the course will work on an individual production over the course of the semester as well as participating in shorter group problem-solving projects. Some alternative media may be explored. Prerequisite: FLS281 or equivalent.

FLS 350 QUESTIONS OF CINEMA
Course Registration Number: 14204 Credits: 4
Meeting Times: N/A Location: N/A
Topics course.

FLS 404 SPECIAL STUDIES
Course Registration Number: 10541 Credits: 4
Meeting Times: N/A   Location: N/A
Description: N/A

FLS 408D SPECIAL STUDIES
Course Registration Number: 10542 Credits: 4
Meeting Times: N/A       Location:   N/A    Description: This is a full-year course.