The INTERDEPARTMENTAL PROGRAM IN FILM STUDIES at the UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS AMHERST presents:
FILM COURSES OF THE FIVE COLLEGES
This list includes Five College film/video/photography courses taught at Amherst, Hampshire, Mount Holyoke, and Smith Colleges, and the University of Massachusetts.
The following listings are still subject to change. Please be sure to check with school offices when registering.
The Interdepartmental Program in Film Studies
at the
University of Massachusetts Amherst
presents the
FALL 2001
FIVE COLLEGE
FILM & VIDEO COURSE GUIDE


UMASS
Amherst
Hampshire
Mount Holyoke
Smith

 
 
UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS

ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH 106O  CULTURE THROUGH FILM
H. Page
W  18:30-21:30  Gray 104
Exploration of different societies and cultures, and cultural anthropology through ethnographic and documentary films.  Focus on non-Western cultures and ecological adaptations, sex roles, ethnicity, religion, politics, and social change.  Film as a medium of communication and cross-cultural understanding.  Note: For students in Orchard Hill residential first year programs only.  Registration available only during summer orientation.

ANTH 306 VISUAL ANTHROPOLOGY
J. Urla
Meets: TuTh 11:15-12:30, lab W 18:30-20:30
This course examines the politics and poetics of visual representation in the field of anthropology, focusing primarily, but not exclusively, on the moving image.  Many of us have our first exposure to individuals from cultures other than their own through visual images; film, photography, and tv.  In this class, we will be critically examining how information about cultural diversity is conveyed through visual images and the historical contexts and theoretical frameworks that have shaped the various ways in which "exotic" peoples were put on display, we will look at the implicit evolutionary paradigms that informed early uses of photography for classifying racial types. From there, we will turn to a survey of classic and contemporary ethnographic film.  Students will be asked to examine a variety of documentary, observational, and experimental styles in both ethnographic film and indigenous media", and to consider how relations of power and authority are embodied in both form and content.  We will also look at recent attempts by native peoples to produce their own television and video as a way of resisting western-imposed media and protecting a sense of their cultural identities.  Our overall goal will be to better understand how and under what conditions visual images contribute to anthropology’s project of fostering meaningful cross-cultural communication.  Attendance, journal, exams.

ART     N.B. Contact department to add courses, restrictions may apply

ART 230 PHOTOGRAPHY I
Staff
Meets: TuTh 8:00-10:45am  or TuTh 1:25-4:10pm, Bart 51
Introduction to photographic tools and methods.  The balance between self-inquiry and the importance of process and materials as vehicles of meaning. Critiques and slide presentations examine photography from both a personal point of view and its wider cultural context. Note: Art, BFA, BFADES majors only.

ART 297V  NONFICTION VIDEO
Liz Miller
Meets: MW 1:25-4:25 FAC 446
This course will provide you with the technological and conceptual skills to complete non-fiction video projects in small groups and individually.  Over the course of the semester students will gain experience in pre-production, production, and post-production techniques.  Projects are designed to develop technical proficiency in the video medium as well as practical skills for the completion of a non-fiction project.  A history of documentary film and video from 1960 to the present will be explored through weekly screenings and readings.  Class will meet twice a week and class time will be divided into three specific activities: in-class workshops, discussion of weekly readings/screenings, and critiques of work produced for the course.  This course is open to both introductory and intermediate level video students with the permission of the instructor.
Course website is: http://www-unix.oit.umass.edu/nart297v

ART 375  ELECTRONIC STILL PHOTOGRAPHY
Gerbracht
Meets:  TTH 8-10:45  FAC 444

ART 397P   PHOTOGRAPHY III
Susan Jahoda
Meets: W 10:10-3:00 Bart 51, W 19:00-22:00 Bart 53
Contact Art Dept for more info and prerequisites.

COMMUNICATION  (Contact UMASS Film Studies or Comm Dept. Course restrictions may apply)

COMM 240:  MODES OF FILM COMMUNICATION
Norden   409 Machmer
Meets:  TuTh 9:30-10:45 lecture Herter 231; Tu 18:00-22:00 screening Herter 227
Lecture, lab (screening).  The nature and functions of film, including narrative and nonnarrative approaches to film communication.  Topics will include: the components of film expression (composition, movement, editing, sound, directing, and acting); designs in screen narrative; film's relationship to other arts and media; and its role as an instrument of social reflection and change.   (Course capacity is 150)

COMM 331.1:  PROGRAM PROCESS IN TELEVISION
Robb
Meets: TuTh 9-12 SC120
Lecture, studio.  Intellectual and practical aspects of communication through the television production process. Theoretical and practical application as integrated in the creation of television content.  Prerequisite: COMM Junior or Senior status. (Course capacity is 12)

COMM 331.2:  PROGRAM PROCESS IN TELEVISION
Oelberg
Meets: TuTh 2-5 SC120
Lecture, studio.  Intellectual and practical aspects of communication through the television production process. Theoretical and practical application as integrated in the creation of television content.  Prerequisite: COMM Junior or Senior status. (Course capacity is 12)

COMM 331.3:  PROGRAM PROCESS IN TELEVISION
Woloch
Meets: WF 9-12 SC120
Lecture, studio.  Intellectual and practical aspects of communication through the television production process. Theoretical and practical application as integrated in the creation of television content.  Prerequisite: COMM Junior or Senior status. (Course capacity is 12)

COMM 340:  HISTORY OF FILM I
Stromgren   412 Machmer
Meets: Th 1-2:15 lecture Herter 227, Th 18:00-20:00 screening Herter 227
Discussion Sections:  340.1 F 9:05; 340.2 F 10:10; 340.3 F 11:15; 340.4 F 12:20; 340.5 F 1:25
Lecture, lab (screening), discussion.  A survey of key events and representative films that mark the history of motion pictures in the United States and other countries to 1950.  In addition to identifying and providing access to major works, the course is designed to facilitate the study of the various influences (industrial, technological, aesthetic, social, cultural, and political) that have shaped the evolution of the medium to the advent of television. (Course capacity is 125 Total/5 discussions @25)

COMM 341:  PRINCIPLES AND TECHNIQUES OF FILMMAKING
Flynn
Meets: TuTh 11:15-12:30 SC 108
Lecture, studio.  Introduction to basic 16mm b/w filmmaking: using Bolex cameras, we learn the concepts of composition, lighting, storytelling, and editing.  (There is some access to sound equipment, but no capacity to do "live sound" sync work.) Each student shoots and edits a few individual films as well as one group project, and thus develops a small portfolio of film work over the course of the semester. Emphasis is on creative experimentation and applying fundamental visual/technical skills to produce interesting work.  COMM Seniors only.  (Course capacity is 12)

COMM 433:  ADVANCED TELEVISION PRODUCTION/DIRECTION
Maxcy
Meets: M 12:20-4:25, F 2-4 SC 120
Lecture, studio.  Creating television content as a means of communication; concepts in practical television content production.  Limited to COMM majors. Prerequisites: COMM 331 or consent of the instructor.  (Course capacity is 10)

COMM 493E.1:   SEMINAR-SCREENWRITING
Norden  409 Machmer
Meets: TuTh 1-2:15 SC 108
Lecture, discussion.  An examination of the art, craft, and business of screenwriting from theoretical and practical perspectives.  Topics included: the nature of screenplay formats and structures;  creation and development of premise, plot, character, and action; scene writing; adaptation issues; place of the screenwriter in the collaborative process of filmmaking; and marketing strategies.  The focus will be on scriptwriting for storytelling movies and, to a limited extent, TV programs.  In-class activities will include exercises in visual thinking, scene analyses, and staged readings.  Written work will include several screenwriting projects.  Prerequisite: Any COMM film course.  (Course capacity is 20)

COMM 493E.2:   SEMINAR-SCREENWRITING
Geisler
Meets: F 10:10-1:00  Machmer 313
See above description.

COMM 497N:  SPECIAL TOPIC-ASIAN POPULAR CINEMA
Ciecko  306 Machmer
Meets:  MW 10:10-11:25 SC 108 lecture; Tu 18:30-20:30 screening
Lecture, discussion. lab (screening).  This course studies popular cinema from Asia and the Asian diaspora with a special emphasis on questions of genre and gender.  While focusing primarily  on specific questions of context (film/ production/exhibition/distribution/ reception), our approach to narrative fiction feature films will also be comparative and cross-cultural, employing interdisciplinary approaches. Film genres to be considered include historical epic/biopic, musicals (including Hindi masala movies), comedy, martial arts/swordplay/samuraifilms, ghost stories and supernatural horror, sci-fi and fantasy (especially Japanese anime), urban gangster/ action films, and "exploitation" genres.  Critical and theoretical course readings from film studies amd cultural studies will likely deal with specific national and transnational industries, audience/reception, auteur theory, genre studies, stardom and fan culture, feminism/gender studies and queer theory, Asia/Pacific/ American studies, postcolonialism and "hybridity", globalization and diaspora. This course includes a mandatory Tuesday evening screening session, and intensive reading and writing projects. There are no specific prerequisites but some background in film studies and/or cultural theory is strongly recommended for advanced undergraduate students. Graduate students from any discipline are also invited to register for the course.  Eligibility:  COMM Juniors & Seniors or permission of instructor.  (Course capacity is 20)

COMM 597C:  SPECIAL TOPICS-FILM & VIDEO EDUC (Cross-listed with EDUC 539)
Brandon  2A Furcolo
Meets: Tu 4-18:30 Furcolo 21B
Lecture, discussion.  This course is designed to explore and encourage the use of creative and relevant films and videos in educational settings and to examine the visual, psychological and technical methods used by filmmakers to convey their messages. A wide variety of films and videos will be shown, and their potential for use in many settings will be explored.  Emphasis will be on developing critical, aesthetic, and social media awareness, examining stereotyping and sex roles in the cinema and facilitating productive and open-ended discussions. Students will be expected to attend all screenings and participate in discussions.  Two papers and one research project will be assigned.  (Course capacity for COMM students: 8)

COMM 693D:  SEMINAR-INTRODUCTION TO FILM THEORY
Ciecko  306 Machmer
Meets: M 18:30-21:30 SC 108
This course will offer an overview of the major theoretical approaches to the study of international film. We will examine various formalist and realist film theories (which together constitute "classical" film theory), as well as theoretical and critical methods informed by structuralism, semiology, phenomenology, psychoanalysis, political theory, and contemporary cultural studies. These may include auteurism, feminism/gender studies and queer theory, genre studies, alternative aesthetics (including concepts of "third cinema"), historical spectator/audience/ reception, star and performance studies, apparatus theory (film, video, and "new media"), and postcolonial theory (issues of racial/ethnic and national identities, as well as globalization).  Students will be responsible for watching films outside class on a regular basis. No prerequisites except a strong interest in international cinema.

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

COMLIT 121 INTERNATIONAL SHORT STORY: FICTION AND FILM
Pasquale
Meets: TuTh 11:15-12:30
For students who love to read, discuss, and write about fiction.  An interest in film and in writing stories is also a plus!  We’ll think, talk, and write about how stories are told.   Looking at language, voice, "texture" of a story, the choices and strategies a writer has made, the way the writer uses a reader; draws us in, subverts our expectations; at the particular way this happens in short fiction where economy and brevity are essential;and in cinematic stories.  Stories by a wide variety of writers from around the world: Yamamoto, Butler, Silko, Achebe, Gordimer, Tan Wang, Vargas Llosa, Cisneros, Erdrich, Alexie, Angelou, Kincaid, Hurston.  Films by: C. Haid, C. Eyre, E. Palcy, J. Singleton, J. Turturro, G. Nava, O. Stone, T. Bui.  We will be partners in exploring what these many texts have to say and the ways they go about doing it.  Where needed, I will give presentations and background.  However, the substance of the course is what you, the students, make of class discussion.  Avariety of approaches include:  discussion the texts outside class in small groups; responsibilty, in pairs, for prompting class discussion; preparation of short creative exercises relative to the day’s readings.  3 short papers, one longer critical paper, one short creative writing assignment, one longer creative writing assignment,occasional in-class writing, essay exam at semester’s end, substantive, daily participation in class discussion.

COMLIT 383 NARRATIVE AVANT-GARDE FILM
Don Levine 305 South College
Meets: lecture Mon 3:35-19:00, disc. sect Tu 2:30, 4:00; W 2:30, 4:00; Honors disc. T 2:30
Lecture, discussion.  Explores modern origin of experimentation in avant-garde modes such as Expressionism, Surrealism, and contemporary results of this heritage, to determine if film is the most resolutely modern of the media.  Emphasis on the ways in which Avant-garde films can problematize themselves through the ploys of telling a story.  By means of a self-consciousness of story-telling which undermines viewer identification, the drive for closure, the demand for origins and order, and even cause and effect, these avant-garde films restore to playfulness its strength and ambiguity.   Requirements: one five page paper for midterm, final paper or project; attendance.

COMLIT 391B FRENCH FILM , also listed as FRENCH 350
Robbie Schwartzwald & C. Portuges
Meets: M 4-19:00, disc Tu 11:15-12:30 or 1-2:15 or 2:30-3:45  Herter 227
See description for FRENCH 350.

COMLIT 391G  FICTIONS OF GRAIL IN LITERATURE AND FILM , also listed as FRENCH 390G
Donald Maddox
Meets: TTH 4-5:15
See description for FRENCH 390G

COMLIT 695A INTERNATIONAL FILM NOIR
Don Levine
Meets: W 2:30- 18:30
Lecture. Often referred to as the only indigenous American film style, film noir in its very appellation reveals that its major effects (for certain modern conceptions of cinema) lay elsewhere.  We will examine film noir in its American heyday (1945-1957) and how it came to be a major propelling force in the new European cinema of 1960's (Godard, and the Cahiers du Cinema). How film noir displaces American social mores and their constitution of reality within the imaginary and symbolic fields, and within the symptomatic concretization of those fields that is normative (dominant) cinema.  How film noir both makes film different and allows already latent difference to be manifested.  How film noir takes shape in the U.S. as expression of the inexpressible (and the ‘unheimlich’) or at least of the allusion to it; which in the lens and on the screen of directors such as Godard and Fassbinder becomes pseudomorphic, presenting a critique of American imperialism both public (political) and private (psychic) the American way of death and love (or, as the title of one work would have it, Love and Napalm: Export U.S.A).  Films by: American directors such as Aldritch, Ray, Fuller, Kubrick, Welles; foreign agents such as Lang, Ophuls, Siodmark, Sirk, Von Sternberg; European directors such as Godard, Fassbinder, Wenders.  Prereq. 2 prior film courses or permission of instructor.

Related Courses:
COMLIT 236 DIGITAL CULTURE
L. Dienes
Meets: MW 2:30-3:20 Hert 227, disc sections W 3:35, 3:35, 4:25, 4:25
An introduction to the cyberage and its cyberarts.  Designed especially for humanists (but also aimed at science and engineering undergraduates), it is a humanistic, non-technical look at computers, technology and the emerging new digital culture, and the meaning of it all.  The orientation of the course could be summed up by saying that it's not a peek under the hood, it’s a driving school”; in other words, it will not deal with the underlying technology, the mathematics or any of the scientific or engineering issues, but rather with what this new tool (the computer) and this new medium (cyberspace) mean for the non-scientific world, for everyday life, for social and political "digital empowerment", and especially for literature and the arts.  It will address areas such as: "digital culture" (our primary focus) referring to actual works of art (literature, painting, film, video, photography, music, performance art, etc.) in their new digital forms, and the implications of nonlinear hypertext "hypermedia") both for artistic creativity, and for the theory and criticism of the arts, especially literature; "digital culture" in its general meaning of an emerging new civilization: the social, political, economic, psychological, philosophical, and even religious implications of the digital revolution, ie. the larger context in which the new digital arts are born and evolve.

EDUCATION

EDUC 505 DOCUMENTARY FILMMAKING FOR EDUCATION
Liane Brandon
Meets: Wed 4-6:30 Furcolo 21B
This is an introductory course providing practical filmmaking experience for educators and others who wish to document their research, interests, programs, and educational endeavors.  Emphasis will be on making super-8mm films using live-action photography and film editing techniques.  Students complete two short documentary projects during the semester.

EDUC 539 USING FILM AND VIDEO IN EDUCATION
Liane Brandon
Meets: Tues 4:00-6:30 Furcolo 21B
Lecture, discussion.  This course is designed to explore and encourage the use of creative and relevant films and videos in educational settings and to examine the visual, psychological, and technical methods used by filmmakers to convey their messages.  A wide variety of films and videos will be shown and their potential for use in many settings will be explored.  Emphasis will be on developing critical, aesthetic, and social media awareness, examining stereotyping and sex roles in the cinema and facilitating productive and open-ended discussions. Students will be expected to attend all screenings and participate in discussions.  Two papers and one research project will be assigned.  Capacity 10.

FRENCH & ITALIAN

FRENCH 350 FRENCH FILM
Robbie Schwartzwald & C. Portuges
Meets: M 4-19:00, disc Tu 11:15-12:30 or 1-2:15 or 2:30-3:45  Herter 227
Weekly film and video screenings, lectures, discussion sections.  Cinematic representations of contemporary French and Francophone identities in recent feature and documentary film, with special attention to the work of younger filmmakers.  The development of French film from the 1930's and its relations to French society.  Analysis and reading of specific films, the ideology of different film practices, and relevant aspects of film theory, including questions of representation.  Films by directors such as Vigo, Carne, Renoir, Bresson, Resnais, Godard, Truffaut, Ackerman, Kurys, Tavernier.

FRENCH 390G  FICTIONS OF GRAIL IN LITERATURE AND FILM
Donald Maddox
Meets: TTH 4-5:15
Since its earliest appearance in Western literature eight centuries ago, the grail has retained immense powers of fascination.  Initially the enigmatic and elusive sacred talisman – the Holy Grail – of medieval Arthurian romance, in later ages it became the expressive centerpiece in a variety of media, including Wagner’s operatic masterpiece Parsifal, numerous 19th and 20th century novels, and a remarkable array of operatic films.  The point of departure for this course is the original 12th century French grail narrative of Chretien de Troyes.  Subsequent readings and screenings will consider how this and later French grail texts laid the comprehensive foundations for a wide variety of artistic and ideological metamorphoses of the theme.  We shall consider the many different ways in which the various thematic components of the story – the Natural, the Waste Land, the Quest, the Fisher King, and the enigmatic Grail – were reworked in literary and filmic settings, both medieval and modern.

GERMAN
GERMAN 304 FROM BERLIN TO HOLLYWOOD: GERMAN FILM
Barton Byg
Meets: lecture and discussion TuTh 2:30-3:45, screenings Wed 18:00-22:00  Hert 227
Images and practices from early German films remain powerful.  Some were incorporated into the propoganda of facism.  Some became the staples of Hollywood genres such as the horror film, film noir, and science fiction.  After World War II, Hollywood’s influence mixed with the trauma of German identity to produce the New German Cinema. The course will treat these issues, as well as German feminist film criticism and practice, East German cinema and the effect of unification on the German film.  Course taught in English.

GERMAN 397C  ST- NATIONAL SOCIALISM IN EAST GERMAN CINEMA
Conducted in English; no other language required
Heimann, Herter 511
The class opens by placing Nazism and the Cold War division of Germany into East and West into the context of twentieth-century German history.  It then looks at how the Nazi (National Socialist) period was represented in films made in communist East Germany.  This raises wide-ranging issues, including: the relations of ideology, art and censorship; the representation of history in documentary and feature film; the role of mass media in society; East German representations of the Holocaust.  Cross-listed with History 397C.

GERMAN 597A  ST- GERMAN FILM:  LITERATURE AND FILM / FILM AND LITERATURE
Barton Byg
Meets:  TTh 4-5:15, W 18:00-22:00  Hert 227
The course will deal with the theories and criticism relating to adaptation from literature to film as
well as the influence the cinema has had on 20th century literature -- both in form and content. Examples will be mainly, but not exclusively, from German film and literature, e.g. Kleist, Böll, Kafka, Christa Wolf and more "popular" authors. Language of the course will be in English but some texts may exist only in German. Students of German are expected to use the original in the case of German literature.

LEGAL STUDIES
LEGAL 397X MEDIA CENSORSHIP
D. Brooks
Meets: TTh 1-2:15, M 4-18:00  Has 134
The regulation of film content: legal regulation (obscenity law), and self-regulation (particularly with respect to Hollywood and the Hays Office). Regulation based on political content, as during the McCarthy period. Regulation of political content in ...contact instructor for complete description

MUSIC
MUSIC 190F MUSIC IN FILM
Roger Rideout
Meets: TuTh 8:00-9:15 Herter 227
The aesthetics and dramatic techniques of film music since 1895.  Excerpts from commercial silent era and sound films studied as examples of film music development and the composer’s art.  Students construct two soundtracks for specific scenes.

PORTUGUESE

PORT 397A  FILM  & CULTURE IN PORTUGESE-SPEAKING AFRICA AND PORTUGAL
Ornelas
Meets:  TTH 4-18:00
Examination of how cinematic images and signs express the diversity and uniqueness of cultures of Portuguese-speaking Africa and Portugal and, at the same time, interpret the complex cultural, linguistic and ideological bonds between the imperial power, Portugal, and its former colonized others, the newly formed countries of Africa where Portuguese is the official language.  Course will explore specific historical periods, especially of Portugal, to show how certain images and values have been perpetuated in national discourses, which have contributed to the imbalance of power in the trans-cultural relationship between Portugal and the African countries, and it will also examine how post-colonial images of African cinema are representing practices of subject-formation and nation-construction in its political, cultural, racial, and sexual dimensions, as these new countries, Angola, Mozambique, Cape Verde, Guinea-Bissau and São Tomé and Princípie, begin to forge a new identity separate from Portugal.  Screenings and analysis of films by some of the following directors:  Manoel de Oliveira, João Botelho, Joaquim Leitão, Luís Filipe Rocha, Jom Tob Azulay, Wim Wenders, José Álvaro Morais, Francisco Manso, João César Monteiro, Flora Gomes, José Fonseca e Costa, Joaquim Leitão, Leão Lopes, Abderrehmane Sissako, Fernando Vendrell, João Mário Grilo, Maria de Medeiros.   Pre-requisites:  None.  Requirements: Several short papers and final research paper.  Instructor: José Ornelas, Spanish and Portuguese

RUSSIAN

RUSSIAN 250: RUSSIAN CULTURE
Dienes
Meets: Tues. 1-3:45
General introduction to Russian culture before the 20th century. Although
the course will emphasize the arts (architecture, literature, music,
dance, painting, especially in the 19th century), it will also examine
the historical roots of modern Russian habits and ways of thinking by
paying attention to history, social ideas, the governmental system,
religious traditions, etc. (A companion course, Russian 251: Modern
Russian Culture, deals with the 20th century.) A significant portion of
the course will use resources on the Web; students will be expected to do
some of the coursework electronically. Numerous films, slide presentations,
possibly visiting lecturers. Prerequisites: No knowledge of Russian required.
 
 

Amherst College

ENGLISH 19 FILM AND WRITING
Professor Barr.
MW  2+
A first course in reading films and writing about them.  A varied selection of films for study and criticism, partly to illustrate the main elements of film language and partly to pose challenging texts for reading and writing.  Frequent short papers.  Two 90-minute class meetings and two screenings per week.

ENGLISH 75 (1)  HITCHCOCK
Professor Cameron.
TTh2+
The work of Alfred Hitchcock occupies a unique position in the field of film studies.  Typically identified as the quintessential example of classic popular film, it has been given the kind of critical and scholarly attention usually reserved for High Art.  It has been a privileged object of  study for commentators from virtually every branch of film study:  from auteurism to psychoanalysis, from formalism to phenomenological philosophy, from semiotics to cultural studies, from genre study to film history.  The course will consider not only the key films of Hitchcock, but it will consider and attempt to account for the extraordinary range of that commentary.  Two class meetings and two screenings per week.  Requisite:  English 19 or 84  (both preferred) or permission of the instructor.

ENGLISH 80F: FILM/VIDEO STRATEGIES: NARRATIVE AND NARRATION
Professor Subrin.
Tu 2-5pm, M screening (mandatory) 7-10pm
This seminar will explore the nature and function of narrative in cinema and video art through a survey of innovative approaches to narrative form. With a brief introduction to the basic principles of classic narrative cinema, we will proceed to explore a wide range of strategies, innovations and movements that have contributed to the history and art of independent film and video, primarily in the United States. Close readings of critical films and texts, writing exercises and extensive discussion will structure the course. Key concerns will be central conflict theory (and other screenwriting conventions), narration and closure, voiceover, film/video genres, experimental media, cinema-as-spectacle, nonfiction narrative.   Filmmakers may include: Hawks, Sirk, Cassavetes, Akerman, Ozu, Thornton, Dash, Benning, Haynes and Kim Trang.
Prerequisite: One film studies or production course, no first year students.   Note: this is not a production course. Limit 25.

ENGLISH 82 WORKSHOP IN THE MOVING IMAGE
Professor Steuernagel
W 1-4pm, screening TBA
An introductory course in the production and critical study of the moving image as an art form: hands-on exercises with video camcorder and editing equipment, supplemented with screenings and critical reading.  Limit 15 students, permission of instructor required.  Contact English Dept before registration.

ENGLISH 83  THE NON-FICTION FILM
Senior Lecturer von Schmidt.
TTh 11:30+
The study of a range of non-fiction films, including (but not limited to) the  documentary,  ethnographic film, autobiographical film, the film essay.  Will include the work of Eisenstein, Vertov, Ivens, Franju, Ophuls, Leacock, Kopple, Gardner, Herzog, Chopra, Citron, Wiseman, Blank, Apted, Marker, Morris, Joslin, Riggs, McElwee.  Two film programs weekly.  Readings will focus on issues of representation, of  truth  in documentary, and the ethical issues raised by the films.

GERMAN 47  WEIMAR CINEMA:  THE  GOLDEN AGE  OF GERMAN FILM
Professor Rogowski.
MW 2+
This course examines the German contribution to the emergence of film as both a distinctly modern art form and as a product of mass culture.  The international success of Robert Wiene’s Expressionist phantasmagoria, The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1920), heralded the beginning of a period of unparalleled artistic exploration, prior to the advent of Hitler, during which the ground was laid for many of the filmic genres familiar today:  horror film (F.W. Murnau’s  Nosferatu), detective thriller (Fritz Lang’s M), satirical comedy (Ernst Lubitsch’s The Oyster Princess), psychological drama (G.W. Pabst’s Pandora’s Box), science fiction (Lang’s Metropolis), social melodrama (Pabst’s The Joyless Street), historical costume film (Lubitsch’s Passion), political propaganda (Slatan Dudow’s Kuhle Wampe), anti-war epic (Pabst’s Westfront 1918), documentary montage (Walther Ruttmann’s Berlin – Symphony of a Big City), and the distinctly German genre of the  mountain film  (Leni Riefenstahl’s The Blue Light).  Readings, including Siegfried Kracauer, Walter Benjamin, Lotte H. Eisner, Béla Bal?zs, and Rudolf Arnheim, will address questions of technology and modernity, gender relations after World War I, the intersection of politics and film, and the impact of German and Austrian exiles on Hollywood.
 
 

Hampshire College

HACU 110  FILM/VIDEO WORKSHOP I
Abraham Ravett
TH 9-11:50, PFB
  This course teaches the basic skills of film production, including camera work, editing, sound recording, and preparation and completion of a finished work in film or video. Students will have weekly assignments, and will also produce a finished film for the class. There will be weekly screenings of student work, as well as screening of films and videotapes which represent a variety of aesthetic approaches to the moving image. Finally, the development of personal vision will be stressed. The bulk of the work in the class will be produced in 16mm format. Video formats plus digital image processing and non-linear editing will also be introduced. A $50 lab fee provides access to equipment and editing facilities. Students are responsible for providing their own film, tape, processing and supplies. There are weekly evening screenings or workshops.  Open, 16 limit,  Film, Video, Production

HACU 111  INTRODUCTION TO MEDIA ARTS: STILL PHOTOGRAPHY I AND THE WEB
Jacqueline Hayden
T 9-11:50, PFB
This course is a Photography course that will incorporate the Web as a viable location for both exhibiting and viewing photographs.  This course is structured around the frame as the primary component of the media arts.   How framing determines interpretation of an image, what occurs inside and at the edges vs. what is implied as happening outside of the frame will be a major consideration for the content of this course. There will be weekly assignments.  Students will be able to self-select what areas they will emphasize in their production work depending on their level of skills entering this course.  Photography will be taught in both its analog and digital form. Basic technical components of the media arts taught will including: camera work, lighting, composition, printing and scanning.  The development of a foundation in visual literacy in the media arts will be stressed through readings and viewing both historical and contemporary works in photography and web-based art- work along with attending presentations by visiting artists. There are weekly workshops, evening screenings and visiting artist presentations.   Open, 16 limit.

HACU/CS 116 INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL IMAGING
Chris Perry
TTH 12:30-1:50, ASH 126
This course will introduce students to the theory and practice of digital imaging: the process of creating and manipulating images with computers. About one-half of class time will be spent on theory, covering the mathematical and computational fundamentals of the field. This material will include image representation and storage, sampling, matte extraction and creation, compositing, filtering, computer-generated imaging and time-based image manipulation. The theory section will also include discussions of the perceptual issues at play in the creation and observation of digital images. The other half of class time will be spent learning off-the-shelf software so that these theories can be explored in practice. Students will be expected to use the software to complete a number of short, creative projects during the first two-thirds of the semester, culminating in a final project during the last third. Knowledge of advanced math is NOT required.   Open, 25 limit.

HACU 124M  MODERN ART AND THE VISION MACHINE
Bill Brand and Sura Levine
TTH 2-3:20 , Ash Aud/ PFB
This multidisciplinary course forms an introduction to art history and art making in the modern period. The course is both an art studies and art production course and serves as a foundation for students who want to do further studies in film, video photography or the studio arts as well as for those who want to pursue art history or cultural studies. All students will be required to complete research; write extended papers, and make visual art projects using a variety of media.  Diego Velasquez's painting   "Las Meninas" (1656) enacts the dual roles of looking and image making. Similarly, Dziga Vertov's "Man with a Movie Camera"(1929) provides a cinematic example of how the looking and making process becomes a metaphor for a new society. This course will examine the coincidental emergence of modern art at the turn of the century with the development of devices of popular entertainment that foreground vision and visuality.   These include photography, stereoscopy, panoramas, phantasmagorias, dioramas, and cinema. By focusing on THE history of art and popular technology, students will develop a language through which they can understand the basics of spectatorship in the modern period. The visual art projects assigned will relate to this process.
Open, 40 limit.

HACU 136F  HAMPSHIRE FILMS
Abraham Ravett
F9-11:50 ,PFB
"Certain people start with a documentary and arrive at fiction...others start with fiction and arrive at the documentary."—Jean Luc Godard
The objective of this course is to introduce non-fiction film and video practice to a group of twelve in-coming students. Through a combination of screenings, lectures, readings and technical workshops, we will explore a critical/historical overview of this genre and incorporate our knowledge and experience into several cinematic profiles chosen by members of the class. Meeting times are 3 hours per week plus an evening screening. There is a lab fee for this course.  1st year seminar, 12

HACU 140  VIDEO I
Matthew Soar
M 2:30-5:20, LIB B5
This intensive course will introduce students to basic video production techniques for both location and studio work.  Over the course of the semester students will gain experience in pre-production, production and post-production techniques as well as learn to think and look critically about the making of the moving image.  Projects are designed to develop basic technical proficiency in the video medium as well as the necessary working skills and mental discipline so important to a successful working process.  No one form or style will be stressed, though much in-field work will be assigned.  Students will be introduced to both digital editing with Adobe Premiere and analog editing using 3/4" decks and an Editmaster system.  There will be weekly screenings of films and vide tapes that represent a variety of stylistic approaches.    Students will work on projects and exercises in rotation crews throughout the term. Final production projects will experiment with established media genres. In-class critiques and discussion will focus on media analysis and image/sound relationships.  (Lab fee $50)   Open, 16 limit.

HACU 140A  VIDEO I
Janet Benn
Tu 12:30-3:30 LIB B5
See above description.

HACU/CS 174 COMPUTER ANIMATION I
Chris Perry
MW 10:30-11:50 ASH 126

HACU 210  FILMMAKING FRAME BY FRAME
Bill Brand
W 9-11:50, PFB
This course is for students who have completed Film/Video Workshop I and are prepared to continue developing their own individual projects in film.  The course will center on the use of the optical printer and the animation stand and will provide detailed instruction on planning and executing projects using these tools.  While the film industry uses optical printing to create special effects and animation to make cartoons, this course instead, will emphasize work that uses these tools for expressive or exploratory purposes.  Students will be expected to complete weekly exercises, complete a final project and make an oral presentation to the class about a particular artist or film.   There will be a $50 lab fee.  Students must purchase their own film and animation supplies and pay their own processing fees. Required screenings and workshops sometimes occur in the evening.   Instructor Permission, 15 limit

HACU 211  PHOTOGRAPHY II: THE PHOTOGRAPHIC DOCUMENT
Jacqueline Hayden
W 1-3:50. PFB
This class is for intermediate level photography concentrators who will participate in a documentary project as a member of a team for the semester.  As a class, we will work with the Department of Urban Planning in Holyoke, MA  documenting renovation of the old mill buildings into art spaces.  Our photographs will be used by the Department of Planning as the official archive of these renovation projects.  Every member of the class will be responsible to take directives for photographing particular buildings, streets, and people. As a final output, members of the class will be involved in writing and designing a brochure, designing a web site and printing for an exhibition.  Skills to be strengthened or acquired are medium and large format cameras, color and black and white, scanning and layout programs and web design.  It will be necessary for students to self-select what output venues best match their interests.  This class is a pre-requisite for a 2002 January term course in Havana, Cuba.  That course will help to create a visual archive of the architectural renovation of Old Havana.   Instructor Permission, 16 limit

HACU 212  VIDEO II: NONFICTION VIDEO  Experiments in Scripting the Self
Baba Hillman
W 6:30-9:30 PM, LIB B5
This is a seminar geared for experienced film/video concentrators who would like to explore or refine their interest in documentary practice.  We will discuss the ethics and strategies of documentary practice.  Utilizing a combination of film/video screenings, viewing of web-based nonfiction work, technical workshops, and contemporary reading as a foundation for our discussions, the goal of the course will be to produce an individual or collaborative project. Prerequisite: Video I or Film/Video I.    15 limit

HACU 248  THE CULTURED CAMERA
Sandra Matthews
TTH 10:30-11:50, FPH ELH
Photography was invented in England and France, but quickly spread across globe. How is the camera used differently in distinct cultural settings? We will begin by looking at the many roles photography has played in the US, and then turn to the study of photographic works made in other Western and non-Western countries. With photography as a base, we may also include examples from film, video and digital imaging. We aim to broaden our experience of photographic images through comparative cross-cultural analyses. Students will keep a journal, write several short essays, complete a visual assignment and present an extended research project to the class.   Open,   25 Limit

HACU 277  CONTEMPORARY FILM AND LITERATURE: POSTCOLONIAL VISIONS FROM AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND
Eva Rueschmann
MW 1-2:20/M 6:30-9:30 FPH 103/ASH Aud
In this course, we will examine the ways in which selected literary texts and popular and independent films from both Australia and New Zealand engage in critical terms with questions of identity, nation and culture that lie at the heart of the two antipodean countries' self-image and colonial history.  Of central interest in our discussions will be representations of landscape, mythologies of national identity,  visions of gender and sexuality, and the complexity of relations between Aboriginal/Maori and European Australians and New Zealanders. Our close readings of novels, short stories and films will be informed by postcolonial, feminist and cultural approaches to screen and literary culture.  Fiction by Janet Frame, Patrick White, Peter Carey, David Malouf, Sally Morgan, Keri Hulme and others. Films by Peter Weir, Jane Campion, Gillian Armstrong, Vincent Ward, Nicholas Roeg, Peter Jackson, Tracey Moffatt and more.   Open,  25 limit

HACU 293  VIDEO AND PERFORMANCE
Baba Hillman
F 9-11:30 ASH 111

HACU 313  ADVANCED TOPICS IN PHOTOGRAPHY
TBA
M 2:30-5:30 ,PFB
This is an advanced workshop for students working on their Division III or completing their Division II exams.  The course is centered on students pursuing an independent exam-based project for the semester and submitting their work in progress to class critique.  Course content will center on contemporary issues in photographic practice, with a focus as well on the conditions facing practicing artists outside of the academic arena.  Included here will be examples of portfolio building, documenting work, visits from artists and to curators, discussion on and practice of writing artists statements and defining grant proposals and the opportunities available for receiving them, among other topics. Students must also be prepared to apportion time to the course for a number of field trips and other events.  Students must have completed two semesters of Photography II or have equivalent experience.   Prerequisite, 16 Limit.
 
 

Mount Holyoke
ART 110 INTRO SEMINAR IN ART HISTORY:  FILMS IN THE AURA OF ART
P. Staiti
MW 1-2:15, M 2:30-4:50 screening  221 ART
Fall 2001: Films in the Aura of Art The best films of the past century have commanded our attention and imagination in part because of their artistry and the way they tell stories visually. This seminar closely examines a selection of those films from around the world that can be considered serious art and understood as events taking place in particular cultures. Among them are Broken Blossoms, Battleship Potemkin, Citizen Kane, Pierrot le Fou, The Bicycle Thief, Days of Heaven, Ugetsu, Woman in the Dunes, The Marriage of MariaBraun, and Heat.   Prerequisite: First year or permission of the instructor. 4 credits; 2 meetings (75 minutes), and 1 screening (2 hours). Distribution HUM1A. Mr. Staiti.

ECONOMICS 100 (01)  ECONOMICS IN POPULAR FILM
S. Gabriel
TTH 11-12:15, M 7-10 screening
An introduction to political economy and economic analysis using a wide range of popular films as the object of analysis. For example, students will view Amistad and discuss the economics of slavery. The basic goal of the course is to provide theoretical tools for applying economic analysis in understanding both historical events and processes and more contemporary issues. See http://www.mtholyoke.edu/courses/sgabriel/filmcourse.html for a more detailed description. This course satisfies requirements in Social Sciences III-A: Anthro, econ, geog, etc.  2 meetings (75 minutes) and 1 film showing (3 hour); 4 credits

FILM STUDIES 201  INTRODUCTION TO FILM
R. Blaetz
MW 1:15-2:30, M 2:30-4:50 screening  101 Dwight
(Writing enriched course) This course teaches the basic concepts and critical skills involved in interpreting film. Through lecture, reading, discussion, and screening of films both in and outside of class, the student will become a more informed and sophisticated observer of the cinema. During the first half of the semester, the class will study form and style in narrative film as well as in non-narrative practices such as avant-garde and documentary filmmaking. For the remainder of the course, the class will examine some of the major critical approaches in the field. Distribution: HUM1A, 2 meetings (75 minutes), 1 screening (2-1/2 hours); 4 credits. Enrollment may be limited. (Revised)

FILM STUDIES 210  PRODUCTION WORKSHOP IN THE MOVING IMAGE
A.  Steuernagel
T 1-3:50, M 7-10 screening  101 Dwight
(Core) This course will focus on the production and critical study of the moving image using video equipment. Included are hands-on exercises with video camcorder and editing facilities, as well as screenings and critical reading. Contact the film studies department before registration. This course satisfies the distribution requirement in humanities-arts, language, and literature. This course satisfies requirements in Humanities I-A: Arts, language and literature.  1 meeting (3 hours), 1 screening (2 hours); enrollment limited to15; a lab fee will be charged.; 4 credits

FILM STUDIES 250  HISTORY OF FILM
R. Blaetz
TTh 11-12:15, T 7-10 screening  301 Shatt
This course offers an historical survey of the cinema as a developing art form and a means of communication. We will consider the national, economic, and social conditions of an international medium that has existed for over a century. The national and thematic focus of the course shifts through the semester. For example, we will focus on U.S. film in studying the earliest developments in film technology and narrative; Soviet and French films to study the formal and social experimentation of the 1920s; and films made in Cuba and Brazil to elucidate political filmmaking in the 1960s. The course provides a background for understanding film history and pursuing further studies in the field. Prerequisite(s): Film Studies 201 or per instructor.  4 credits; 2 meetings (75 minutes), 1 screening (2 hours). Distribution(s): HUM1A.    (New).

FRENCH 321  THE FRENCH NEW WAVE
C. Legouis
T 1-3:50  225 Cirut
The French New Wave, its Origins and its Influence  The New Wave was a series of films made in the 1960’s by a group of pioneers known as ‘rats de cinémathèque, who had seen almost every film ever made and particularly admired American and Russian cinema.  This creative explosion won an esthetic and political victory against an increasingly affluent, self-satisfied society, and brought about a revolution in the film industry that still echoes today, from Spain to Japan, from Eastern Europe to Africa, and from Scandinavia to the United States.  Prerequisite(s): Two of French 215, 219, 225, or 230.  4 credits.  One meeting (2 hours, 50 minutes); Topics.

HISTORY 399  CLIO BY THE BOOK AND AT THE MOVIES  Senior Colloquium
R. Schwartz
W 1-3:50 108 Porter, M 7-9:30 screening 216 Skinner
Representing the Past in Written and Filmed Histories A colloquium for senior history majors and minors taught every fall by members of the department. Each year the class will work together to compare and reflect upon a variety of approaches to studying the past that Clio, the muse of history, continues to inspire.   (Speaking intensive course) A colloquium in which senior history majors and minors and department faculty will explore the various approaches to studying the past that Clio, the muse of history, continues to inspire. In fall 2000, we shall explore the differences and similarities between the representations of the past in written accounts and in film. Case studies will include paired readings and films on such topics as the French Revolution, the World Wars, American popular culture, civil rights, and the women's movement. This course satisfies requirements in Humanities I-B: History, philosophy and religion.

ITALIAN 215/315  ITALIAN CINEMA & LIT: An Intertextual Approach to Italian Culture and Society
F. Santovetti
MW 1:15-2:30, plus 2nd meeting time   217 Cirut
This course looks at the participation of Italian writers and filmmakers in the public discussion of such controversial themes in modern Italian culture and society as diversity and sexual discrimination, the failure of Italian unification and the condition of the South, conformity and resistance to Fascism, the making of the modern hero/heroine, and the crisis of identity. Authors will include C. Levi, Sciascia, Brancati, Moravia, and Tarchetti; the directors Rosi, Amelio, Bolognini, Bertolucci, and Scola. Secondary readings on cultural studies, film theory, narratology, and script writing will also form part of the syllabus. This course satisfies requirements in Humanities I-A: Arts, language and literature

ITALIAN 315 Cinema & Literature: An Intertextual Approach To Italian Culture & Society
Students enrolling in Italian 315 attend the class meetings of Italian 215  (see "Courses in Translation") and in addition must enroll in a one-hour tutorial, which is lecture/discussion in Italian. All work and readings are in Italian. This course satisfies requirements in Humanities I-A: Arts, language and literature  Prereq. 221 or permission of instructor; 2 meetings (75 minutes) plus tutorial (1 hour); 4 credits

RUSSIAN STUDIES 230 RUSSIAN CINEMA: Building A Culture On Film: Russian Cinema  Early
E. Cruise
W 1-3:50  301 Skinner
Russian cinema (Eisenstein, Dovzhenko, Pudovkin, Vertov) created a  revolutionary art form for the brave new world of communist Russia. That early inventiveness of language and form reverberated throughout the cinematic world.  A survey of this rich film heritage gives strong visual resonance to the cataclysmic history of Russia and the Soviet Union (Kalatozov, Tarkovsky, Shepitko, Muratova) and to the cinema in the post-Soviet world (Mamin, Bodrov, Lungin).  4 credits; 1 meeting (3  hours), 1 additional meeting (1 hour TBA). Distribution(s): HUM1A.  (New)

SPANISH 352  SPANISH LITERATURE: 20th CENTURY:  From Bunuel To Almodovar:  The Spanish Cinema
A. Castilla
W 1-3:50, T evening screenings  9 Cirut
This course will study, from a variety of critical and aesthetic perspectives, major works by representative Spanish filmmakers, such as Luis Buñuel, Juan Antonio Bardem, Luis García Berlanga, Victor Erice, Pilar Miró, Josefina Molina, José Luis Garcí, and Pedro Almodovar.  Special attention will be given to understanding film in its cultural and historical context, as well as to the creative process of adapting literary works into film. Tuesday evening screenings of the films will be scheduled.  Prerequisite(s): Spanish 235, 237, 244, or 246 or permission of instructor.  4 credits; 1 meeting (2 hour 50 minutes).  Distribution(s): HUM1A or Language.
 
 

Smith College

FLS 200 INTRODUCTION TO FILM STUDIES
Alexandra Keller
MW 2:40-4:00, screening M7:30-9:30  Seelye 201
An overview of cinema's historical development as an artistic and social force. Students will become familiar with the aesthetic elements of cinema (visual style, sound, narration and formal structure), the terminology of film production, and film theories relating to formalism, ideology, psychoanalysis and feminism. Films (both classic and contemporary) will be discussed from aesthetic, historical and social perspectives, enabling students to approach films as informed and critical viewers. Limited to 40.

FLS 241  WOMEN & AMERICAN CINEMA: REPRESENTATION, SPECTATORSHIP, AUTHORSHIP
Alexandra Keller
MW 1:10-2:30, screening T 3:00-4:50  Seelye 201
This course provides a broad survey of women in American cinema -- women on screen, as spectators, and as filmmakers -- from the silent period to the present.  It examines how women are represented in films, and how those images relate to actual contemporaneous American society and culture.  The course also explores issues of female spectatorship and female authorship as they relate to genre, the star and studio systems, dominant codes of narration, and conceptions of the female gaze.

FLS 280 VIDEO PRODUCTION WORKSHOP:  FR. NUTS & BOLTS TO VIDEO ART
Liz Miller
Meets:  T 1-4:50 Bass 103, W 7:30-9:30  Seelye 201
Video I is an introductory video production course. This class will introduce you to the history and contemporary practice of video art/documentary video and will provide you with the technical and conceptual skills to complete creative video projects in small groups and individually. Over the course of the semester, students will gain experience in pre-production, production and post-production techniques. Projects are designed to develop basic technical proficiency in the video medium as well as practical skills for the completion of the creative project. Prerequisite: 200 (which may be taken concurrently). Enrollment limited to 13.

FLS 350  FILM & THE OTHER ARTS: VISUAL CULTURE FROM SURREALISM TO MTV
Alexandra Keller
T 1:00 - 4:50  Engin 201
This class investigates cinema and its relationship to the rest of 20th century art, especially visual culture. Working with the premise that film has been arguably the most influential, powerful and central creative medium of the age, the course examines how film has been influenced by, and how it has influenced, interacted with, critiqued, defined, and been defined by other media. Historically we shall examine how film has moved from a marginal to a mainstream art form, while still often maintaining a very active avant-garde practice. The class also looks at how cinema has consistently and transhistorically grappled with certain fundamental issues and themes, comparing the nature of cinematic investigation with that of other media.   Prerequisite:  FLS 200 Intro to Film Studies.
 
 

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