SMITH COLLEGE

Five College Film & Video Course Guide
SPRING 2011 (updated 10/27/10)

(All courses 4 credits unless otherwise noted.  Course information may be subject to change.) 

FLS 245 BRITISH FILM AND TELEVISION
WF11:00AM-12:10PM, TTh7:00PM-9:00PM, location TBA
Jefferson Hunter
A survey of the British cinema from the Thirties to the present day, with some attention to literary parallels and literary adaptations, and with a look at recent television drama.  Works by Alfred Hitchcock, the documentarists Humphrey Jennings and Michael Apted, “the Archers” (Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger), Mike Leigh, Tony Richardson, the Boulting brothers, Carol Reed, Mike Hodges; Ealing comedy and Monty Python’s Flying Circus; film by and about multicultural Britain; the “heritage cinema” of Ismail Merchant and James Ivory; versions of Shakespeare; Alan Bennett’s spy thriller A Question of Attribution and Dennis Potter’s gangster miniseries The Singing Detective.   Collateral readings in George Orwell, John Buchan, and Graham Greene.  Prerequisite:  a college course in English literature or in film, or permission of the instructor.
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  5

FLS 252 BITE ME: THE CULTURAL & CRITICAL USES OF THE VAMPIRE
TTh10:30AM-11:50AM, T7:00PM-11:00PM, location TBA
A. Jones, A. Keller
This course addresses vampire beliefs and their proliferation in cultural forms since the first legends of the undead in Europe and in cultures around the world. What have vampires been made to signify? Starting with early vampire myths and recent anthropological interpretations, we will move historically and thematically through a range of works, considering how vampires have been shaped as carriers of history and genealogy, symptoms of religious and class anxiety, central figures of postcolonial critique, polymorphous sexual identity and addiction, and challengers to prevailing ideologies of gender and sexuality, HIV/AIDS, and immigration as cultural invasion. Theoretical and critical readings will be central. Prerequisite: a college-level course in literature or film studies. 
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB
Five College Film Studies Major category:  6,7

FLS 280: INTRODUCTION TO VIDEO PRODUCTION
M7:00PM-9:00PM, W7:00PM-9:00PM, location TBA
Lucretia Knapp
This course involves both an introduction to the history and contemporary practice of experimental video and video art, as well as the acquisition of conceptual and technical skills to complete inspired individual video projects. Students will be engaged in screenings, readings and discussion, class exercises, and produce three to four (short) individual video projects. Each project will involve the construction of a concept/narrative and its manifestation in the video medium (set, actors, camera, sound, editing). Projects are designed so students learn to develop the content of their work and foundational proficiency in the use of a video camera and digital video editing.
Prerequisite: FLS 200; can be taken concurrently. Permission of the Instructor required. Enrollment limited to 13.
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  8
           
FLS 351 FILM THEORY
Alexandra Keller
T1:00PM-2:50PM, location TBA
This seminar will explore central currents in film theory, including formalist, realist, auteurist, structuralist, psychoanalytic, feminist, poststructuralist theories, and genre, queer and cultural studies approaches to questions regarding the nature, function, and possibilities of cinema. We will understand film theory readings through the socio-cultural context in which they were and are developed. We will also be particularly attentive to the history of film theory: how theories exist in conversation with each other, as well as how other intellectual and cultural theories influence the development, nature and mission of theories of the moving image. We will emphasize written texts (Bazin, Eisenstein, Kracauer, Vertov, Metz, Mulvey, DeLauretis, Doty, Hall, Cahiers du Cinema, the Dogme Collective, etc.), but will also look at instantiations of film theory that are themselves acts of cinema (Man with a Movie Camera, Rock Hudson’s Home Movies, The Meeting of Two Queens). The course is designed as an advanced introduction and assumes no prior exposure to film theory. Fulfills film theory requirement for the major and minor. Enrollment limited to 12. Prerequisite: 200 or the equivalent. Priority given to Smith College Film Studies Minors and Five College Film Studies Majors. Priority given to seniors, then juniors.
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIA, IV, V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  3

CLT 266: SOUTH AFRICAN LITERATURE AND FILM
Katwiwa Mule
TTh1:00PM-2:50PM, location TBA
A study of South African literature and film since 1948 in their historical, social, and political contexts. How do writers and film makers of different racial and political backgrounds remember and represent the past? How do race, class, gender, and ethnicity shape the ways in which they use literature and cinema to confront and resist the racist apartheid state? How do literature, film, and other texts such as testimonies from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission function as complex cultural and political sites for understanding the interconnections among apartheid taxonomies, various forms of nationalisms, and the often hollow post-apartheid discourse of non-racial "New South Africa?" Texts include testimonies from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, novels such as Alan Paton's Cry the Beloved Country, Mazisi Kunene's Mandela's Ego, Njabulo Ndebele's The Cry of Winnie Mandela, Nadine Gordimer's July's People, J.M. Coetzee's Waiting for the Barbarians, Athol Fugard's Tsotsi and Zoe Wicomb's You Can't Get Lost in Cape Town. We will also analyze films such as Cry the Beloved Country, Sarafina!, Tsotsi, Cry Freedom, and South Africa Belongs to Us
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  6

DANCE 377: ADVANCED STUDIES IN HISTORY & AESTHETICS: FLEETING IMAGES: CHOREOGRAPHY ON FILM
Constance Hill
MW2:40PM-4:00PM, M7:00PM-9:00PM, location TBA
This selected survey of choreography on film and video indulges in the purely kinesthetic experience of watching the dancing body on film. We will focus on works that have most successfully effected a true synthesis of the two mediums, negotiating between the spatial freedom of film and the time-space-energy fields of dance, the cinematic techniques of camera-cutting-collage, and the vibrant continuity of the moving body. Viewing a range of visual materials, from silent physical comedies and backstage-chorus line musicals to experimental dance films, martial-arts action flicks and music videos, we will discern the roles of the choreographer and director in shooting, pacing, editing and scoring the moving image. The concept of dancing in film genres will hopefully be enlarged as we consider film choreography as a distinct form of creative expression that functions to maintain and assert cultural and social identities, demonstrating the holistic role of dance as a visual art form, an intrinsic expression of a shared American culture.
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIA, IIB, IV, V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  6, 7 

EAST ASIAN LANGUAGES & LIT 316: REVISING THE PAST IN CHINESE LITERATURE & FILM
Sujane Wu
T3:00PM-4:50PM, location TBA
This seminar will explore how China recollects, reflects and reinterprets its past, and most importantly, how Chinese history and its literary and cultural traditions are represented in a new light on the world stage through visual arts. We will begin the focus on biographical and literary texts which are adapted and transformed into cinematic texts. This seminar is open to students interested in Chinese literature and culture, as well as art, comparative literature, history, theater, and other disciplines. The students will go to Taiwan upon completion when funding is available. Enrollment limited to 12 juniors and seniors. 
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, IV, V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  6

ENGLISH LANGUAGE & LITERATURE 334: SEMINAR: SERVANTS IN LITERATURE & FILM
Ambreen Hai
Th1:00PM-2:50PM , location TBA
Often invisible but crucial, servants in English literature have served as comic relief, go-betweens, storytellers, sexual targets, and sometimes as central protagonists. But what roles do they play in contemporary literature and film? What can we learn from them about modernity, class, power relations, sexuality, gender, marriage or family? What new responses do they evoke from us? This seminar will consider how writers from various cultures and times call upon the figure of the domestic servant for different purposes, and how a view from (or of) the margins can change how and what we see. Writers include Shakespeare, Richardson, Emily Bronte, Wilkie Collins, Kazuo Ishiguro, Kiran Desai, Khaled Hosseini, Deepa Mehta. Admission by permission. Enrollment limited to 12.
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, IV, V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  6

ENGLISH LANGUAGE & LITERATURE 353: SEMINAR: ADVANCED STUDIES IN SHAKESPEARE: SHAKESPEARE AT THE MOVIES
Gillian Kendall
T1:00PM-2:50PM, location TBA
Shakespeare wrote using a particular set of conventions tailored for the stage. When Shakespeare’s plays are translated into film, they run headlong into another set of conventions: the cinematic. Out of this clash come extraordinary visions metamorphosed from texts that were always meant to be visual, that were never intended to lie dead on the page. In exploring the ways in which directors and actors interpret Shakespeare’s texts, we will also be exploring what movies do with metaphor, simile, imagery: the language that, on a bare stage or a bare page, creates the flesh and blood of a Renaissance play. We will also address the ways in which plays blossom into meaning through cinematic editing, cinematography and the conventions of film. In short, we will take Shakespeare to the movies. Some plays whose metamorphoses we may examine: Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet, The Merchant of Venice, Much Ado About Nothing, Macbeth, The Tempest.
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, IV, V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  6

ENGLISH LANGUAGE & LITERATURE 382: READINGS IN AMERICAN LITERATURE: FILM NOIR AND AMERICAN FICTION
Dean Flower
T3:00PM-4:50PM, location TBA
Discussion of the relationship between the "hard-boiled" school of American writing from Dashiell Hammet, Raymond Chandler, and James M. Cain in the 1930s to Patricia Highsmith and Jim Thompson in the early 1950s-and the film genre that emerged when these works were adapted for the screen, beginning with The Maltese Falcon in 1941. The films of such directors as Fritz Lang, Robert Siodmak, Michael Curtiz, Edward Dmytryk, Alfred Hitchcock, Nicholas Ray, Jacques Tourneur, and Orson Welles will be discussed. Topics will include the popular reception of such bleak and violent narratives, their capacity for disruption and social critique, their extreme representations of gender and race, the sources of their ideology (both European and American), their transcendence of mere "pulp fiction" and "thriller" genres, their distinctive styles and aesthetic principles, their influences upon one another, and their subsequent influence, particularly in recent neo-Noir films.
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, IV, V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  6

GERMAN STUDIES 300: TOPICS IN GERMAN CULTURE & SOCIETY: VOM KRIEG ZUM KONSENS: GERMAN FILM SINCE 1945
Joel Westerdale
MW1:10PM-2:30PM, location TBA
This course will investigate German film culture since the fall of the Third Reich. Included are works by Fatih Akin, Michael Haneke, Werner Herzog, Margarethe von Trotta, and Wolfgang Staudte. Students will learn to analyze film and conduct basic research in German. Discussion will address aesthetic and technical issues; portrayals of race, gender, class, and migration; divided Germany and its reunification; and filmic interventions into the legacy of Nazism. In German. Prerequisite: GER 250 or permission of the instructor.
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, IV, V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  5, 6, 7

PSYCHOLOGY 314: SEMINAR IN FOUNDATIONS OF BEHAVIOR: COGNITION IN FILM
Maryjane Wraga
W2:10PM-4:00PM, location TBA
This seminar explores the cognitive processes underlying human perception and comprehension of film, the techniques film makers use to capitalize on these processes, as well as the general portrayal of cognition by film makers. We will read and discuss empirical articles and view relevant examples of film. Topics range from change blindness and apparent motion to various depictions of amnesia in 20th century film. Prerequisite: PSY 218 or PSY 219 or permission of the instructor.
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIA, IV, V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  6

SPANISH & PORTUGUESE 365: NOVELA ESPANOLA CONTEMPORANEA: IMMIGRATION AND REPRESENTATION IN SPAIN (FILM, FICTION, AND ESSAY)
Reyes Lazaro
MW2:40PM-4:00PM, location TBA
Immigrants as authors and 'motifs' in 20th and 21st century Spain. Why is the Orpheus myth a dominant metaphor to represent current immigration in the Iberian Peninsula? How does history affect this representation? Who represents whom? Are contemporary immigrants from North Africa, Latin America and Eastern Europe represented differently than the Spaniards who emigrated to Germany, Switzerland and France in the fifties? Do immigrant writers challenge official literary and social histories? This course addresses these questions, as well as theoretical issues concerning the specificity of fictional representation. Texts include documentaries, feature films, journalistic articles, short stories, poems and songs by Juan Goytisolo, Beatriz Diaz, Andres Sorel, Nieves Garcia Benito, Abou Azzedin,Victor Omgba, Ignacio del Moral, Inongo vi Makome, Jeronimo Lopez Mozo, Rachid Nini, Roberto Bodegas, Helena Taberna, Iciar Bollain, Alain Techine and Llorenc Soler. Enrollment limited to 14.
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, IV, V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  6

SPANISH & PORTUGUESE 373: SEMINAR: LITERARY MOVEMENTS IN SPANISH AMERICA: LITERATURE, FILM AND THE TRANSNATIONAL IMAGINATION IN LATIN AMERICA
Maria Helena Rueda
TTh9:00AM-10:20AM, location TBA
This class will look at how Latin American filmmakers and writers have imagined this region’s place in the post Cold War global configuration since the 1990s. Through the analysis of films such as Maria, Full of Grace (2004) and City of God (2002), as well as recent literary works by authors from various backgrounds, we will explore cultural production as an alternate means of negotiating conflicts related to immigration, drug trafficking, free trade agreements, media and consumer culture, and continuing political instability. Enrollment limited to 14.
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, IV, V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  6

THEATRE 242: ACTING II: ACTING FOR THE CAMERA
Daniel Kramer
MW1:10PM-4:00PM, location TBA
Acting II offers intensive focus on different, specific topics pertaining to acting training. THE 242 can be repeated for credit up to three times provided the content is different. Prerequisites: Acting I (THE 141) or its equivalent.
Spring 2011:  What is the particular nature of acting for the camera? This course is designed to aid the actor in the transition from stage to screen work. We will examine film and television production and its physical characteristics, and develop an acting approach suited for work in film and television. Students will work on camera, and examine the results of their work. A limited number of students may be able to take the course with an emphasis on directing for the camera. Prerequisite: THE 141 or FLS280 and permission of the instructor. Enrollment is limited to 12.
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  8