Smith College Film Courses 

SMITH COLLEGE FALL 2006

 

ARS 282 01 PHOTOGRAPHY I

10773 Stables, Fraser A 4 Studio M W 1:10 PM-4:00 PM

Permission of Instructor

 

ARS 282 02 PHOTOGRAPHY I

15853 Ferrario, Paola A 4 Studio T R 9:00 AM-11:50 AM

Permission of Instructor

 

ARS 383 01 PHOTOGRAPHY II

11329 Ferrario, Paola A 4 Studio T R 1:00 PM-4:00 PM

Permission of Instructor

 

FLS 200 01 INTRO TO FILM STUDIES

10536 Alexandra L A Cap 60 Lecture M W 1:10 PM-2:30 PM Keller

Film M 7:00 PM-10:00 PM

This class offers an overview of cinema's historical development as an artistic and social force. Students will become familiar with the aesthetic elements of cinema (visual style, sound, narration and formal structure), the terminology of film production, and film theories relating to formalism, ideology, psychoanalysis and feminism. Films (both classic and contemporary) will be discussed from aesthetic, historical and social perspectives, enabling students to approach films as informed and critical viewers. We start with the invention of cinema and the development of its language, tracing the rise of narrative conventions that have dominated the mainstream film for decades. We examine alternatives to Hollywood style editing and narrative, including Soviet Montage, Surrealism, American Experimental film, and the long-take aesthetics of Jean Renoir and other filmmakers. Subsequently we investigate other components of film language including cinematography, mise-en-scene, lighting, framing and camera movement. Having developed a solid grounding in the language of film, we when turn our attention to the relation of ideology and film form, as well as a historical examination of the development of a particular film genre (e.g., the western, science fiction, melodrama, etc.) as a way of examining film language from an explicitly historical perspective.

Films include Rear Window, Battleship Potemkin, Man with a Movie Camera, The Conversation, All that Heaven Allows, The Age of Innocence, Do the Right Thing. Work for the class includes two tests involving the close analysis of film sequences and one final paper. (Cross-listed with AMS.)

 

FLS 282 01 ADVANCED VIDEO SEMINAR

1643313 4 Studio M 1:10 PM-4:00 PM Knapp, Lucretia A

Topic: Dead Time in the Narrative Film. Film W 7:00 PM-9:00 PM

In this advanced video production class students will develop and produce an original narrative short, while considering ways in which time and memory have been fashioned within various cinematic narratives. To further the construction and development of narrative, two of the films will be read in relation to the novel from which they are adapted. Some of the films screened will include La Jete, To Kill a Mockingbird, After Life, The Hours, Donnie Darko and The Virgin Suicides. Prerequisite: FLS 280. Enrollment limited to 13. Priority given to Smith College Film Studies Minors and Five College Film Majors.

 

FLS 350 01 QUESTIONS OF CINEMA

16756 Cap 16 Film W 7:00 PM-10:00 PM A

Topic: The Scary Movie: Horror Film from the Silent Era to the 1970s

Lecture R 3:00 PM-4:50 PM

Topic is pending CAP approval.

 

FLS 400 0 SPECIAL STUDIES

15322 1-4 Sp Stdies

Admission by permission of the program

 

FRN 244 01 FRENCH CINEMA

16243 4 Film M 7:30 PM-9:30 PM Gantrel-Ford, Martine A F L

Topic: Paris on Screen. Lecture T R 1:10 PM-2:30 PM

Few cities have inspired artists more than Paris. In this course, we will discuss ways in which, starting with the New Wave, French film directors have used the City of Light to reflect some of the most significant cultural and social changes of their times. Films by Truffaut, Godard, Chabrol, Varda, Sautet, Rohmer, Denis, Assayas, and Jeunet. Readings in film criticism and film history. Papers and weekly screenings required. Cross-listed with Film Studies. Prerequiste: FRN 230, or permission of the instructor.

 

GER 230 01 TOPICS IN GERMAN CINEMA

16312 4 Lecture M W 2:40 PM-4:00 PM Westerdale, Joel P A H L

Topic: Weimar Film. Film M 7:30 PM-9:30 PM

During the brief period between the fall of the Kaiser and the rise of the Nazis, Germany was a hotbed of artistic and intellectual innovation, giving rise to an internationally celebrated film industry. With an eye to industrial, political and cultural forces, this course explores the aesthetic experience of modernity and modernization through formal, narrative and stylistic analyses of feature films from the “Golden Age” of German cinema. Films by Wiene, Lange, Murnau, Pabst, Ruttmann, Starnberg, Sagan, Riefenstahl. Conducted in English.