MOUNT HOLYOKE COLLEGE

Five College Film & Video Course Guide

SPRING 2011

(updated 10/29/10)

(All courses 4 credits unless otherwise noted.  Course information may be subject to change.) 

FLMST-202-01 TALKING PICTURES: INTRO TO FILM             
Also (ARTH-202-01)                      
MWF 1:15-2:05, 106B Gamble and T 7-9:30 Screening, 106B Gamble
P. Staiti                      
(Art History 202)  Some of the best feature-length films of the past century have commanded our attention because of their compelling artistry and the imaginative ways they tell stories visually and verbally. This course closely studies narrative films from around the world, from the silent era to the present, and in the process it introduces students to the basic elements of film form, style, and narration. Some of the films to be considered are: Broken Blossoms, Battleship Potemkin, Citizen Kane, Contempt, The Bicycle Thief, Ugetsu, Rear Window, Woman in the Dunes, The Marriage of Maria Braun, Days of Heaven, and Moulin Rouge.
Meets Humanities I-A requirement
4 credits; expected enrollment 50. ; 2 meetings, (1 75 minute and 1 2-hour screening)
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  I
Five College Film Studies Major category:  1

FILM STUDIES 220 (01) SPECIAL TOPICS IN FILM STUDIES
THE REMEMBRANCE OF THE HOLOCAUST IN FILM
(German Studies 223)(Speaking- and writing-intensive) (In German)
MW 2:40-3:55, location TBA and T 7-9 Screening, location TBA
K. Remmler
This seminar explores the remembrance of the Holocaust as represented primarily, but not solely, in German and European films from the immediate postwar era to the present, including documentary and feature film, as well as in other forms of visual media, such as television, photographs, and art. Themes include the working through of the past, expressions of guilt, remorse and sorrow, and the relationship between art and politics as exemplified in attempts to understand the causes, motives, and consequences of the Holocaust. Films include Night and Fog, Shoah, Schindler's List, Gebürtig, The Night Porter, Life is Beautiful, The Nasty Girl, Wannsee Conference and others.
Meets Language requirement or Humanities I-A requirement
Prereq. Same as GERM-223. Previous study of German; 4 credits; expected enrollment 30. ; Students enrolled in 223 are expected to enroll in the complementary two-credit tutorial (German Studies 224).
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  6

FILM STUDIES 220 (02) SPECIAL TOPICS IN FILM STUDIES
SPECTERS, MONSTERS, AND THE MIND: GOTHIC AND GROTESQUE IN ANGLO-GERMAN FILM AND FICTION FROM FRANKENSTEIN TO TWILIGHT AND TRUE BLOOD
(GERM-231-01)  (Speaking- and writing-intensive; taught in English) (Component) 
MW 1:15-2:30, location TBA               
G. Davis                                             
Love and death, romance and assault; when the bourgeois novel began equating marriage contracts with romantic love, a "darker" narrative evolved: Romantic Schauderliteratur, horror fiction. We discuss social and psychological rationales as well as aesthetic representations of such phenomena as the "Gothic" and "Grotesque," "the fantastic," and "science fiction," as well as cross-cultural influences. Texts/films: Shelley's Frankenstein; Stoker's Dracula, Murnau's/Herzog's Nosferatu, Merhige's "shadow"; Kafka's/Nemec's Metamorphosis; Süskind's/Tykwer's Perfume; Dürrenmatt's/Mambety's Visit/Hyenas.
Meets Humanities I-A requirement
Prereq. Film Studies 201, 202, or permission of instructor; 4 credits; expected enrollment 30. ; taught in English, no knowledge of German required
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  6 (component)

FILM STUDIES 250 (01) HISTORY OF WORLD CINEMA: THE FIRST 100 YEARS (1832-1932)
MW 11-12:15,            220 ART and             M 7-9 Screening, 220 ART                           
K. Eisenstein  
In this historical survey we will study three periods from the first half of the cinema's past (1832-1932); its invention, its silent days, and its transition to sound. From the optical effect of the phenakistoscope (1832) through the efforts of Edison and Lumiere, from the classical style of Hollywood to the montage theories of Sergei Eisenstein, from the adoption of sound-on-film to the benshi strikes in Japan, this course will introduce students to the fascinating figures, structures, and technologies that built the world's cinema.
Meets Humanities I-A requirement
Prereq. Film Studies 201,202 or 203; 4 credits; expected enrollment 30.
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIA, V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  2

FILM STUDIES 280 (01) FILM AUTHORSHIP:  CINEPHILIA AND THE AUTEUR--FORESTS AND TREES
MW 2:40-3:55            , 220 ART    and  T 7-9 Screening            220 ART
K. Eisenstein
In his review of Bitter Victory (1958), Jean-Luc Godard declared: "the cinema is Nicholas Ray." In his study The American Cinema: Directors and Directions 1929-1968, Andrew Sarris placed Ray just beneath the "Pantheon Directors" in a lovely named but secondary grouping he called "The Far Side of Paradise." This course will dive into this fascinating period of film criticism and cinephilia (the 1950s and 1960s). By examining the French response (Andre Bazin and Cahiers) to the American cinema (mainly of the 1940s and 1950s), and by looking at the films of directors like Ray, Howard Hawks, and Fritz Lang, we will explore the French influence on American and British critics.
Meets Humanities I-A requirement ;  4 credits; expected enrollment 20.
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIA, V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  4

FILM STUDIES 290 (01) FILM THEORY:  PHILOSOPHY AND FILM THEORY
 (PHIL-275-01)
TTH 1:15-2:30, location TBA and T 2:30-4:00, location TBA
T. Wartenberg
An exploration of philosophical issues encountered in the study of film. Why do we need a theory of film? What is a film anyway? Do films have "authors"? How do films engage our emotions? Can films be socially critical? What can we learn from films? These are examples of the topics to be discussed in this course as we investigate the nature of film and its relation to philosophy. There will be weekly required film screenings.
Meets Humanities I-B requirement
Prereq. 4 credits in department or in film studies, or permission of instructor; 4 credits; expected enrollment 30. ; 2 meetings (75 minutes), 1 screening (1.5 hours)
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIA, V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  3

FILM STUDIES 295 (01) INDEPENDENT STUDY
Does not meet a distribution requirement.
Prereq. soph, jr, sr, and permission of program; 1 to 4 credits

FILM STUDIES 310 (01) PRODUCTION SEMINAR:  DOCUMENTARY WORKSHOP: ADVANCED VIDEO PRODUCTION
TH 9:00-12:00            , LITS 231 and W 7-9, LITS 231 Screening
B. Mellis                    
An advanced course in the theory and practice of film/video production as an art form. Topics for the seminar will vary from year to year.
Spring 2011:  In this class, we will take skills and insights gained in introductory production courses and develop them over the length of the semester through the creation of one short documentary project, 10-20 minutes long. We will explore the ethical questions and ambivalences inherent in this medium, seeking complex answers to difficult questions about representation and the often blurry lines between fiction and nonfiction. We will watch documentaries each week, films that introduce us to new ideas and information both in their content and in their form. Come with your idea; we will hit the ground running with proposal writing the first week.
Meets Humanities I-A requirement
Prereq. Beginning video production or its equivalent. Application and permission of instructor required. Application available through FS Web site.; 4 credits; expected enrollment 10. ; 1 meeting (3 hours), 1 screening (2 hours); a lab fee may be charged.
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IV, V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  8

FILM STUDIES 320 (01) SEMINAR IN FILM STUDIES:  AFRICAN AMERICANS IN HOLLYWOOD FILM
(ENGL-357-01)      
M 1:15-4:05, location TBA
G. Pemberton
This course examines the construction of black male and female images beginning at the start of the twentieth century, continuing to today. Taking D. W. Griffith's The Birth of a Nation as a starting place, we will study how narratives stereotyped black identity, creating a series of cherished and enduring types. We will also contrast the depiction of blacks with those of Asians, Europeans, and white Americans.
Meets multicultural requirement; meets Humanities I-A requirement
Prereq. Jr, sr; 4 credits; expected enrollment 15. ; 1 meeting (3 hours) plus screening prior to class (TBA)
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, IV, V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  4, 7

FILM STUDIES 320 (02) SEMINAR IN FILM STUDIES:  HITCHCOCK AND AFTER
(ENGL-374-01)
W 1:15-4:05, 212 Skinner            and M 7-9 Screening, 212 Skinner
Description TBA.
Meets Humanities I-A requirement
E. Young
Prereq. 8 credits in film studies or permission of instructor; 4 credits; 1 meeting (3 hours), 1 screening (2 hours)
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, IV, V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  4, 7

FILM STUDIES 320 (03) SEMINAR IN FILM STUDIES:  THEATRE ON FILM/FILM ON THEATRE
(THEAT-350-01)      
T 1:15-4:05, 105 Rooke and screening TBA
E. Rundle
For over a century, the relationship between stage and screen has been mutually defining. From the early influence of melodrama on cinematic form to contemporary experimental performance practices, theatre and film have sustained a rich, ongoing dialogue. With this in mind, we will study films that engage with theatricality as well as stage work that embraces cinematic sensibilities. Course materials include a broad selection of films in various genres as well as theoretical readings and a selection of plays. A special section of the course will be devoted to Shakespeare on film. Required weekly screenings will be complemented by attendance at live theatre performances.
Meets Humanities I-A requirement
Prereq. Film Studies 201 or permission of instructor.; 4 credits
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIA, IIB, IV, V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  7

FILM STUDIES 340 (01) SEMINAR IN FILM STUDIES:  WOMEN EXPERIMENTAL FILMMAKERS
(GNDST-333-10)
TH 1:15-4:05, 220 ART
R. Blaetz
This topics course provides advanced instruction in an aspect of film history, theory, or criticism. Students are expected to bring substantial background in the study of film to this course; enrollment may be limited.
Spring 2011:  This seminar examines experimental cinema made by women from the early 1950s, during the earliest years of the movement known as the American Avant-Garde, through the 1990s. While the class will read feminist film theory and see the work of such well-known filmmakers as Yvonne Rainer, Sally Potter, and Chantal Akerman, we will also examine the less familiar but highly influential films of women working in the home movie or diary mode, with particular emphasis on the work of Marie Menken.
Meets Humanities I-A requirement
Prereq. Film Studies 201,202,or 203; 4 credits; expected enrollment 15. ; 1 meeting (3 hours), 1 screening (2 hours)
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, IV, V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  4, 7

FILM STUDIES 370 (01) TOPICS IN NATIONAL/TRANSNATIONAL CINEMAS:  BOLLYWOOD : A CINEMA OF INTERRUPTIONS
M 1:15-4:05, 221 ART and W 7-9:30 Screening, 221 ART
A. Sinha                     
How are we to respond to Indian popular film, which is notorious for its distracting song and dance numbers, meandering story line, and visually overblown spectacles? This seminar will develop historical and theoretical approaches to Indian films as what scholar Lalitha Gopalan calls a "constellation of interruptions." Students will examine feature films in class, write critical papers on scholarly essays, and pursue independent research projects on various aspects of Indian film.
Meets Humanities I-A requirement
Prereq. jr, sr, 8 credits in art history or film studies, or permission of instructor; 4 credits; expected enrollment 15. ; 1 meeting (3 hours), 1 screening (3 hours)
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, IV, V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  5, 7

FILM STUDIES 370 (02) TOPICS IN NATIONAL/TRANSNATIONAL CINEMAS:
STATES OF TERROR: FROM KASPAR HAUSER TO 9/11 IN FILM AND TEXT
(German Studies 325, European Studies)(Speaking- and writing-intensive)
T 1:15-4:05 , location TBA
G. Davis
Case studies in terror/ism, starting with the case of the mysterious 1828 foundling Kaspar Hauser, rumored even during his lifetime to have been the prince of Baden. Surviving the terror of solitary imprisonment for 12 years, was he the victim of political terrorism at the time? The course investigates parallels and differences between Kaspar's case and the terrorism of the leftist Red Army Faction (RAF) that shook Germany as of the 1970s, as well as their relation to the trauma of 9/11 and present-day international conflict. Multidisciplinary text selection on topos. Films range from New German Cinema (Herzog, von Trotta) to Ulrike Meinhof (2006) and Der Baader-Meinhof Komplex (2008).
Meets Language requirement or Humanities I-A requirement
Prereq. sr; nonseniors by permission of instructor; 4 credits; expected enrollment 30. ; In German, Component course for Film Studies
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, IV, V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  6 (component)

FILM STUDIES 395 (01) INDEPENDENT STUDY
Does not meet a distribution requirement.
Prereq. soph, jr, sr, and permission of program; 1 to 8 credits; a lab fee may be charged