MOUNT HOLYOKE

 

FLMST 230S (01) DOCUMENTARY FILM

R. Blaetz

MW 2:40-3:55PM and T 7:00 - 9:00PM

This course examines the principles, methods, and styles of nonfiction film. Beginning with the "actualités" of film history's first practitioners and ending with contemporary self-reflexive films, such as Errol Morris's The Thin Blue Line , the class studies films that strive to represent some aspect of the real world as opposed to the fictional worlds of narrative cinema. Satisfies Humanities I-A requirement

Prereq. Film Studies 201 or 202 or permission of instructor; 2 meetings (75 minutes) plus 1 screening (2 1/2 hours); 4 credits ; enrollment limited to 25

FLMST 250S (01) HISTORY OF WORLD CINEMA

R. Blaetz

MW 8:35 - 9:50AM and T 7:00 - 10:00PM

This course offers an historical survey of the cinema as a developing art form and a means of communication. We will consider the national, economic, and social conditions of an international medium that has existed for over a century. The national and thematic focus of the course shifts through the semester. For example, we will focus on U.S. film in studying the earliest developments in film technology and narrative, Soviet and French films to study the formal and social experimentation of the 1920s, and films made in Cuba and Brazil to elucidate political filmmaking in the 1960s. The course provides a background for understanding film history and pursuing further studies in the field. Satisfies Humanities I-A requirement. 2 meetings (75 minutes), 1 screening (2 1/2 hours); 4 credits ; enrollment limited to 40

 

FLMST 310S (01) PRODUCTION SEMINAR ON THE MOVING IMAGE

J. Perlin

W 1:00 - 3:50PM and T 7:00 - 10:00PM

An advanced course in the theory and practice of film/video production as an art form. Topics for the seminar will vary from year to year. Satisfies Humanities I-A requirement

Prereq. By permission of instructor only.; 1 meeting (3 hours), 1 screening (2 1/2 hours); a lab fee may be charged; 4 credits ; enrollment limited to 10

 

FLMST 370S (01) TOPICS IN NATIONAL/TRANSNATIONAL CINEMAS : FROM BICYCLE THIEVES TO GUERRILLEROS: ITALIAN, FRENCH, & LATIN AMERICAN CINEMAS

C. Gundermann

M 7:00 - 10:00PM

(Writing-intensive; See Spanish 320s(01).)

Offers a critical, historical, and theoretical approach to the cinema of a single country or group of countries. Some examples of national cinemas that might be studied are: French cinema, Francophone cinema, Indian cinema, Eastern European cinema, or Latin American cinema. Satisfies Humanities I-A requirement. Prereq. 8 credits in the department including Film Studies 201or 202 or permission of instructor; 1 meeting (3 hours), 1 screening (2 hours); 4 credits ; enrollment limited to 16