MOUNT HOLYOKE COLLEGE

NOTE: Most courses have additional screening times; some courses require prerequisites and/or have limited enrollments. Please check the course catalogue and supplement for more information. For information on the Film Studies Program at Mount Holyoke, please call 538-2200, or visit the Film Studies Program website at www.mtholyoke.edu/acad/film 4/6/04

 

FILM STUDIES 202S (01) TALKING PICTURES: AN INTRO TO FILM

P. Staiti

W 1:15 – 3:05pm, M 7-10pm (Film Scr.)

Credits 4 Reqs Met IA (Art History 202)

Some of the best feature-length films of the past century have commanded our attention because of their compelling artistry and the imaginative ways they tell stories visually and verbally. This course closely studies narrative films from around the world, from the silent era to the present, and in the process it introduces students to the basic elements of film form, style, and narration. Some of the films to be considered are: Broken Blossoms, Battleship Potemkin, Citizen Kane, Contempt, The Bicycle Thief, Ugetsu, Rear Window, Woman in the Dunes, The Marriage of Maria Braun, Days of Heaven, and Moulin Rouge

Satisfies Humanities I-A requirement

 

FILM STUDIES 250S (01) HISTORY OF WORLD CINEMA Credits4 Reqs Met IA

R. Blaetz

Meeting Times MW 8:35-9:50 T 7:00-10:00

This course offers an historical survey of the cinema as a developing art form and a means of communication. We will consider the national, economic, and social conditions of an international medium that has existed for over a century. The national and thematic focus of the course shifts through the semester. For example, we will focus on U.S. film in studying the earliest developments in film technology and narrative, Soviet and French films to study the formal and social experimentation of the 1920s, and films made in Cuba and Brazil to elucidate political filmmaking in the 1960s. The course provides a background for understanding film history and pursuing further studies in the field.

Satisfies Humanities I-A requirement

Prereq. Film Studies 201 or permission of instructor; 4 credits; enrollment limited to 40; 2 meetings (75 minutes), 1 screening (2 1/2 hours)

 

FILM STUDIES 260S (01) FILM GENRE: THE SCIENCE FICTION FILM

Credits 4 Reqs Met IA
R. Blaetz

Meeting Times: TuTh 1:15-2:30* and W 7:00-9:00 (*This time has been changed recently, replacing the original MW 2:40-3:55 time listed in the MHC and 5 College Course Catalog), small Gamble

This course offers a critical, historical, and theoretical approach to a specific film genre. Some examples of genres that might be studied are: the science fiction, horror, melodrama, musical, Western, detective, or gangster film.

This course explores various manifestations of the science fiction film as it has appeared from the beginning of film history. Examples include the early "magic" films of Melies and Clair, as well as the numerous examples of the genre from the 1950s, and more contemporary films such as 2001 and Videodrome. The course traces the formal and thematic history of the genre, with attention paid to the figuration of modern science, the evolution of social roles, the logical body, and postmodern representations of time and space. Satisfies Humanities I-A requirement

Prereq. Film Studies 201 or permission of instructor; 4 credits; enrollment limited to 25; 2 meetings (75 minutes) and 1 screening (2 hours, 30 minutes)

 

FILM STUDIES 310S (01) PRODUCTION SEMINAR ON THE MOVING IMAGE: STRUCTURE, SOUND, & VISION

Credits 4 Reqs Met IA

H. Hey

Meeting Times W 1:00-3:50 T 7:00-10:00

An advanced course in the theory and practice of film/video production as an art form. Topics for the seminar will vary from year to year.

This course continues to explore the moving image as an art form, focusing on three specific components: structure, sound, vision. The first segment of the course will explore films whose structure makes them most memorable. The second segment will examine innovative ways in which sound is used in film. The final segment of the course will focus on films in which the visual element predominates. Emphasis will be placed on the technical/aesthetic aspects of media art production. Students will be expected to create their own video/audio work. Weekly screenings will be supplemented with readings offering a theoretical/historical context in which to think about independent cinema and video art. Satisfies Humanities I-A requirement

Prereq. Film Studies 210, equivalent, or permission of instructor; 4 credits; enrollment limited to 10; 1 meeting (3 hours), 1 screening (2 1/2 hours); a lab fee may be charged

 

FILM STUDIES 320S (01) SEM. IN FILM STUDIES: HITCHCOCK & AFTER

Credits4 Reqs Met IA

E. Young

W 1-3:50 and M 7-10pm (Film Scr.)

This topics course provides advanced instruction in an aspect of film history, theory, or criticism. Students are expected to bring substantial background in the study of film to this course; enrollment may be limited. See ENGLISH 374F.

Satisfies Humanities I-A requirement

Prereq. 8 credits in film studies or permission of instructor; 4 credits; 1 meeting (3 hours), 1 screening (2 hours)

 

 

FILMST 370 VIOLENCE, RITUAL, FANTASY: SPANISH CINEMA SINCE THE CIVIL WAR (IN SPANISH)

J. Crumbaugh

TUTH 2:40-3:55 and TH 6-8pm (Film Scr.)

This course will examine a selection of some of the most critically acclaimed and widely studied Spanish movies, and familiarize students with the critical vocabulary and fundamental concepts of Spanish film studies. Focusing on the recurrent tropes of violence, ritual, and fantasy, students will pay particular attention to the role film has played in Spanish culture since the end of the country's traumatic and bitterly divisive Civil War in 1939. Directors will include Pedro Almodóvar, Juan Antonio Bardem, Juan José Bigas Luna, Luis Buñuel, Julio Medem, Carlos Saura, and Imanol Uribe, among others.

 

Reg # Section Credits Instructors Meeting Times

GERMAN STUDIES 231S (01)GERMAN LITERATURE & CULTURE IN A EUROPEAN CONTEXT: HAUNTED UTOPIA?:

WEIMAR CINEMA (1919-1931): FROM CALIGARI TO M

Credits 4 Reqs Met IA

G. Davis

Meeting Times MW 1:15-2:30 and screening time TBA

An introduction to critical reading and writing, with emphasis on practicing oral and written strategies for discussing and analyzing texts and the reader's response to them. Both fictional and nonfictional readings selected from various periods and perspectives. Different topics may be offered each year.

(Speaking- and writing-intensive course) A study of such representative films from Germany's "Golden Age" as Wiene's The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, Lang’s Metropolis, M, Murnau’s Nosferatu, and Pabst’s Joyless Street. Emphasis on investigating historical and sociological background; influence of Expressionist theater; advent of sound; the ‘New Woman’; genesis of horror, action, and utopian film; influence on New German Cinema and contemporary popular culture. Includes such contemporary “remakes” as Herzog’s Nosferatu and the 2002 anime Metropolis. Music videos by Queen and Madonna.

Satisfies Humanities I-A requirement

Prereq. none; 4 credits; 2 meetings (75 minutes); team-taught course with Smith College using the interactive networked classroom; includes discussion with experts and students in the U.S. and Germany; cross-listed with Film Studies MHC and Smith College Germ 231 and Film Studies 150; no knowledge of German required

 

** MOUNT HOLYOKE “FILM COMPONENT” COURSES:

 

**FRENCH 225S (01) INTERMEDIATE LEVEL COURSES IN CULTURE AND LITERATURE – INTRO. TO CONTEMPORARY CULTURE AND MEDIA OF FRANCE AND THE FRENCH-SPEAKING WORLD

Credits 4 Reqs Met IA,L **Film Component course only

C. Rivers

Meeting Times TTH 1:15-2:30

The primary purpose of this course is to familiarize students with contemporary issues in French culture as they are represented in French-speaking media of today.

(Speaking-intensive course) This course will introduce students to contemporary popular culture in France and the French-speaking world, largely through the study of recent (post-1995) best-selling novels, popular music, and feature films. Students will be asked to give formal oral presentations based on up-to-date materials gathered from the Internet and/or French television and to participate actively in class discussion.

Satisfies Language requirement or Humanities I-A requirement

Prereq. French 203, or placement score of 430+, or department placement; 4 credits; enrollment limited to 16; 2 meetings (75 minutes)

 

**FRENCH 370S (01) ADV LEVEL SEMINAR: POLITICAL PASSION AND NATIONAL PREDICAMENT: 1789 AND 1940 IN FRENCH FILM

Credits 4 Reqs Met IA,L **Film Component course only

N. Vaget

Meeting Times W 1:00-3:50

The seminar is intended to challenge students at the highest level. A regular rotation of topics ensures a variety of perspectives across genre and period, encompassing linguistic, literary, theoretical, and cultural issues of French and Francophone studies. Development of critical skills is stressed through classroom discussion and critique of writing projects, drawing on individual student interests and experiences as they relate to the topic of the course.

Students will study two passionate moments in French history: the spectacular revolution of 1789, and the startling collaboration of France and Germany during the Second World War. Contemporary cinema gives us a chance to peer into the past while pondering major questions of the present. We will examine works of film directors such as Andrzej Wajda and Ettore Scola who reinvented the French revolution. We will also study films that probe moments of great civil distress when, from 1940 to 1944, the French population was torn between conflicting forces of resistance and collaboration. Students will examine viewpoints and intentions of film directors inspired by these dramatic events.

Satisfies Language requirement or Humanities I-A requirement

Prereq. two courses at the advanced level, or permission of department chair and course instructor; 4 credits; enrollment limited to 16; 1 meeting (2 hours, 50 minutes). The Web is used for course management. No previous knowledge of technology is necessary. Technological support will be provided.

 

**GERMANSTUDIES315S(01)CROSSING THE LINE: SUBVERSIONS OF SEX, GENDER, & NATION IN GERMAN LITERATURE AND FILM

Credits 4 Reqs Met IA **Film Component course only

G. Schmidt

Meeting Times MW 2:40-3:55

This course explores the complexity of German-speaking culture, thought, and history by focusing on a specific topic through an interdisciplinary lens. Topics may include the study of culture broadly defined (language, art, architecture, music, politics, economics, or history) of a particular period or the study of gender, race, sexuality, ethnicity, or class based on a recurring social problem, cultural form, or idea.

(Speaking- and writing-intensive course) This course will apply the insights of gender studies and queer theory to the treatment of historical developments such as urbanization, women’s emancipation, the gay rights movement, fascism and the World Wars, the Cold War and the division of Germany, the student movement of 1968, reunification, and immigration. We will examine the way particular aesthetic movements such as literary modernism, postwar realism, New German Cinema, and recent popular comedy films engage with broader debates about sex, gender, and nation carried out in politics, medicine, the natural sciences, and philosophy.

Satisfies Humanities I-A requirement

Prereq. Open to students who have previously studied German; 4 credits; 2 meetings (75 minutes)

 

**GERMAN STUDIES 325S (01) SENIOR SEMINAR: THE HI/STORY OF KASPAR HAUSER: TERROR/ISM IN REALITY AND REPRESENTATION

Credits 4 Reqs Met IA,L **Film Component course only

G. Davis

Meeting Times T 1:00-3:50

This seminar is designed to explore the complex nature of our field of inquiry. We explore such questions as: What does German studies mean? What is interdisciplinary work? What role does literature play in culture studies? What is the relationship between language and the construction of culture? What meanings have been attributed to the terms: "culture" and "civilization?" Texts from a variety of disciplines. Students compose term papers or Web projects on topics related to their major field(s) of interest. This course is required of all senior majors and fulfills a 300-level major requirement for the nineteenth or twentieth century, dependent on work pursued for the semester project.

(Speaking- and writing-intensive course) A case study of the mysterious Kaspar Hauser, a foundling of unknown origins, rumored to have been the prince of Baden, who appeared at the age of 16 in Nuremberg in 1828. He lived under the constant threat of unknown terror and was murdered in 1833. His true identity remains a topic of debate. Primary sources on politics, law, history, medicine, psychology, education, music, theater, art, literature and film available on a multimedia CD-ROM. Focus on experiences of terror/ism and its impact on identity formation, its relation to language acquisition and the socialization processes of the historical Kaspar Hauser, and extend to international representations of this topos since the 1800s.

Satisfies Language requirement or Humanities I-A requirement

Prereq. sr, 12 credits including one 300-level course, nonseniors by permission of the department; 4 credits; 2 meetings (75 minutes) or 1 meeting (2 1/2 hours; This course fulfills an eighteenth-, nineteenth-, or twentieth-century 300-level requirement for the major, depending on the topic of a student's semester project.

 

**HISTORY 283S (01) TOPICS IN THE RECENT HISTORY OF THE U.S.: AMERICAN MEDIA HISTORY

Credits 4 Reqs Met IB **Film Component course only

D. Czitrom

Meeting Times MW 11:00-12:15

These courses are designed for students with a background in American history who wish to focus attention on developments since the late nineteenth century.

A historical overview of the evolution of mass media in the United States since the mid-nineteenth century: How have they reshaped our world? The focus will be on the institutional, economic, and cultural history of several key modern media forms: newspapers and magazines, the motion picture industry, sound recording, radio and television, and postbroadcasting technologies. Special attention to the historical connections among and between these media, to various approaches to analyzing their effects, and to their changing political and cultural influence.

Satisfies Humanities I-B requirement

4 credits; 2 meetings (75 minutes)

 

**PHILOSOPHY 273S (01) PHILOSOPHY OF THE ARTS

T. Wartenberg

Credits 4 Reqs Met IB Satisfies Humanities I-B requirement

MW 11:00-12:15

Can a pile of bricks be art? What is the difference between a musical work and a bunch of random noise? What makes a Marx Brothers movie funny? Othello a tragedy? Should art appeal to the masses?

 

**THEATRE ARTS 350S (01) SEMINAR: LESBIAN & GAY THEATRE AND FILM

Credits 4 Reqs Met IA **Film Component course only

P. Alekson

Meeting Times T 1:00-3:50 and F 9:00-11:50

A survey of the stage and screen treatment of homosexuality throughout history beginning with the classical Greek and Elizabethan stage, highlighting Chinese and Japanese traditional drama, and proceeding to the present time. Subjects will include: stage transvestitism, the stereotypes of the effete dandy and the predatory lesbian, underground/independent vs. commercial film representations, drag, the concept of camp, gay liberation, coming-out narratives, documentary film, AIDS drama, and contemporary queer theory and performance. One extra session per week will be devoted to film screening. The course will also take advantage of any live theatrical events in the region.

Satisfies Humanities I-A requirement

Prereq. 8 credits in the department or in related subjects or permission of instructor; 1 meeting (3 hours), 1 screening (3 hours).; 4 credits