Mt. Holyoke College Film Courses 

MOUNT HOLYOKE COLLEGE FALL 2006

 

FILM STUDIES 101F (01) FILM AND HISTORY: THE REMAKE [57893]

R. Blaetz

MW 11:00-12:15 & T 7:00-9:00 Cap 15

(Writing-intensive course) How do films about historical figures and events differ from written versions? Why do Hollywood and the world's film industries continually re-imagine the events of the past (there have been over forty films made about Joan of Arc alone), and what do audiences enjoy in these films? Through readings, discussion, and film screenings we will examine the relationship between cinema and history. 2 class meetings (75 minutes), with a Tuesday night screening. Only first-year students may preregister for this course. Sophomores, juniors and seniors may inquire if there is space available during the first two weeks of class.

Meets Humanities I-A requirement. 4 credits; enrollment limited to 15

 

FILM STUDIES 202F (01) TALKING PICTURES: AN INTRO TO FILM [57888]

(cross-listed as ARTH-202)

P. Staiti

TTH 11:00-12:15 & W 7-9PM screening Cap 40

Some of the best feature-length films of the past century have commanded our attention because of their compelling artistry and the imaginative ways they tell stories visually and verbally. This course closely studies narrative films from around the world, from the silent era to the present, and in the process it introduces students to the basic elements of film form, style, and narration. Some of the films to be considered are: Broken Blossoms, Battleship Potemkin, Citizen Kane, Contempt, The Bicycle Thief, Ugetsu, Rear Window, Woman in the Dunes, The Marriage of Maria Braun, Days of Heaven, and Moulin Rouge.

Meets Humanities I-A requirement

4 credits; enrollment limited to 40; 2 meetings, (1 75 minute and 1 2-hour meeting)

 

FILM STUDIES 203F (01) INTRO TO SPANISH & LATIN AMER FILM [57894]

(cross-listed as Spanish 221(Core))

C. Gundermann

TTH 2:40-3:55 Cap 16

(Speaking- and writing-intensive course)

This course offers a broad introduction to the history, politics and aesthetics of Latin American and Spanish cinema in the context of, and in contrast with, cinemas from other regions, especially hegemonic Hollywood aesthetics. This course will also focus specifically on introducing students to the basic terminology and methodologies of film analysis, thus preparing them for the department's film seminar (Spanish 320) and other advanced courses in film studies.

Meets multicultural requirement; meets Humanities I-A requirement

4 credits; enrollment limited to 16; 2 meetings (75 minutes)

 

FILM STUDIES 210F (01) PRODUCTION SEM IN THE MOVING IMAGE

SPACE, SILENCE, SPLICING, SOUND: BEGINNING VIDEO PROD [57889]

J. Perlin

TH 9:00-12:00 & W 7:00-9:00 Cap 12

This beginning video course is an intensive introduction to digital video cameras, microphones, lights and digital video editing. The "space" section investigates basic shooting strategies. In the "silent" section, we study the silent film genre, viewing historical and contemporary works. "Splicing" looks at editing as a primary focus for the creation of meaning. The "sound" section examines audio as an aesthetic world with a life of its own. The course requires production assignments and numerous readings, and weekly evening screenings. Final projects entail the creation of one or more videos of your own devising.

Meets Humanities I-A requirement. 4 credits; enrollment limited to 12; 1 meeting (3 hours), 1 screening (3 hours); A lab fee may be charged.

 

FILM STUDIES 260F (01) FILM GENRE: THE MUSICAL [57890]

R. Blaetz

MW 2:40-3:55pm & T 7:00-9:00 pm screening Cap 25

This course offers a critical, historical, and theoretical approach to a specific film genre. Some examples of genres that might be studied are: the science fiction, horror, melodrama, musical, Western, detective, or gangster film.

(Gender Studies 204-02) This course explores the American musical film from its first appearance in the early 1930s in the films of Busby Berkeley to its recent revival in films such as Baz Luhrmann's Moulin Rouge. The course also examines musical films from other national cinemas that either comment self-reflexively on the genre and its American context and/or expand common definitions of the genre.

Meets Humanities I-A requirement

Prereq. Film Studies 201 or 202 or by permission of instructor; 4 credits; enrollment limited to 25; 2 meetings (75 minutes) and 1 screening (2 hours).

 

FILM STUDIES 280F (01) FILM AUTHORSHIP: FILMS OF MARGARETHE VON TROTTA

(Writing-intensive course; Cross-listed as Grmst-223)

G. Davis

TTH 1:15-2:30pm Cap 25

Award-winning contemporary filmmaker Margarethe von Trotta has created controversy both as a woman in a "male" domain and through her women protagonists. We study unconventional women who challenge their worlds and themselves, trying to forge a place in society and relationships which break through traditional patterns. The course also introduces basic film vocabulary and explores such cultural topics as lifestyle changes (in the comedy Mit fünfzig küssen Männer besser), German terrorism and the tabloid press (The Lost Honor of Katharina Blum), love in divided Germany (The Promise), a women's boycott which saved their Jewish husbands (Rosenstraße), and the "secret" police (Die andere Frau).

Meets Humanities I-A requirement

Prereq. Open to students who have completed an intermediate-level German course, or per permission of department chair; 4 credits; enrollment limited to 25; 2 meetings (75 minutes), 1 lab (50 min)

 

FILM STUDIES 320F ( 01) SEM IN FILM ST: VISUALIZING CULTURES [57892]

(Cross-listed as Anthro 310f) (Film Studies COMPONENT course)

D. Battaglia

W 1:00-3:50 Cap 20

This topics course provides advanced instruction in an aspect of film history, theory, or criticism. Students are expected to bring substantial background in the study of film to this course; enrollment may be limited.

Fall 2006: In this course we go behind the scenes and behind the screens of anthropological films, television, museum exhibitions, and publications such as National Geographic Magazine, to explore the social contexts of their production, distribution, and interpretation. We consider how popular images of cultural “others” reveal the lives and times that produce them, and how, as sites of cultural exchange and political debate, such images shape and are shaped by relations of power. Further, we consider the diversity of local responses to images of cultural identity and begin to explore the complexities of “picturing cultures” from different subject positions across the global mediascape.

Meets multicultural requirement; does not meet a distribution requirement.

Prereq. Prereq. 8 credits in department or permission of instructor; 4 credits; enrollment limited to 20; 1 meetings (3 hours)

 

FILM STUDIES 370F (01) TOPICS IN NATIONAL/TRANSNATIONAL CINEMAS COITUS INTERRUPTUS: INDIAN FILM & ITS ATTRACTIONS [57891]

(Cross-listed as Art History 360 (Core))

A. Sinha

T 1:00-3:50 + one 3-hour screening

How are we to respond to Indian popular film, which is notorious for its distracting song and dance numbers, meandering storyline, and visually overblown spectacles? Seminar will develop historical and theoretical approaches to Indian films as what scholar Lalitha Gopalan calls a “constellation of interruptions.” Students will examine feature films in class, write critical papers on scholarly essays, and pursue independent research projects on various aspects of Indian film.

Meets Humanities I-A requirement.

Prereq. jr, sr, 8 credits in art history, or film studies, or permission of instructor; 4 credits; enrollment limited to 16; 1 meeting (3 hours), 1 screening (3 hours)

 

FILM STUDIES 380F (01) TOPICS IN FILM AUTHORSHIP

THE 18TH CENTURY: JANE AUSTEN: READINGS IN FICTION & FILM [58418]

J. Lemly

T 1:00-3:50 + screenings Cap 15

(Writing-intensive course; ENGL-320 Component) Offers a critical, historical, and theoretical approach to a specific cinematic author. While most courses focus on a director or group of directors, courses may also focus on designers, technicians, performers, producers, or some combination of these personnel.

Fall 2006: A study of Austen's six novels through the lenses of Regency culture and of twentieth-century filmmakers. How do these modest volumes reflect and speak to England at the end of world war, on the troubled verge of Pax Britannica? What do the recent films say to and about Anglo-American culture at the millennium? What visions of women's lives, romance, and English society are constructed through the prose and the cinema?

Prereq. jr, sr, 8 credits in English/Film studies beyond 101; prior work in eighteenth- to nineteenth-century literature, history, or film recommended; students should have read at least two Austen novels; 4 credits; enrollment limited to 15; 1 meeting (3 hours) plus screenings; satisfies English department 1700-1900 requirement; satisfies English department seminar requirement

Meets Humanities I-A requirement