MOUNT HOLYOKE COLLEGE

NOTE: Most courses have additional screening times; some courses require prerequisites and/or have limited enrollments. Please check the course catalogue and supplement for more information. For information on the Film Studies Program at Mount Holyoke, please call 538-2200, or visit the Film Studies Program website at www.mtholyoke.edu/acad/film

Part I: Mount Holyoke College Production Courses :

FS 210 PRODUCTION WORKSHOP /MOVING IMAGE

Wed 7-9pm (screening) & Thurs 9-12

Instructor TBA

This course offers an introductory exploration into the moving image as an art form outside of the conventions of the film and television industries. This class will cover technical and aesthetic aspects of video production and will also offer a theoretical and historical context in which to think about independent cinema and video art.

Satisfies Humanities I-A requirement; 1 meeting (3 hours), 1 screening (3 hours); a lab fee may be charged; 4 credits ; enrollment limited to 12

 

Part II: Mount Holyoke College Non-Production Courses:

 

FILMST 201 INTRODUCTION TO FILM

MW 8:35-9:50am & T 7:00-9:00pm (screening) ART 220

R. Blaetz

This course teaches the basic concepts and critical skills involved in interpreting film. Through lecture, reading, discussion, and screening of films both in and outside of class, the student will become a more informed and sophisticated observer of the cinema. During the first half of the semester, the class will study form and style in narrative film as well as in nonnarrative practices such as avant-garde and documentary filmmaking. For the remainder of the course, the class will examine some of the major critical approaches in the field.

Satisfies Humanities I-A requirement ; 2 meetings (75 minutes), 1 screening (2 1/2 hours); 4 credits ; enrollment limited to 40

 

FILMST 320: SEM: MODERNISM & THE CINEMA

Tu 7:00-9:00pm (screening) & W 1:00- 3:50pm Art 220/221

R. Blaetz

This topics course provides advanced instruction in an aspect of film history, theory, or criticism. Students are expected to bring substantial background in the study of film to this course; enrollment may be limited.

Satisfies Humanities I-A requirement; Prereq. Film Studies 201 or 202.; 1 meeting (3 hours), 1 screening (2 hours); 4 credits ; enrollment limited to 12

 

FILMST 380 HENRY JAMES INTO FILM

D. Weber M 7-10pm Shtk 203

(Writing-intensive; See as English 345f (01).)

(American Studies 301f and Film Studies 380f) This seminar will examine the various screen adaptations of assorted novels by Henry James. We will read the novels against the films, exploring how James's texts translate--or do not translate--into film. Novels and films to be studied include Washington Square, The Europeans, Portrait of a Lady, The Turn of the Screw, and Wings of the Dove.

Meets Humanities I-A requirement; Prereq. jr, sr, 8 credits in department beyond English 101, 4 credits in film studies, or permission of instructor; 4 credits; enrollment limited to 15; 1 meeting (3 hours); satisfies English department 1700-1900 requirement; satisfies English department seminar requirement

 

ECON 100 (02) ECONOMICS IN POPULAR FILM

S. Gabriel MW 11:00-12:15pm and M 7-10pm (screening) Skinner 212

First-year seminar (Writing-intensive course)

An introduction to political economy using a wide range of popular films as the object of analysis. For example, students will discuss slavery based on the film A Respectable Trade and the economics of the environment in the context of Erin Brockovich. The basic goal of the course is to provide theoretical tools for applying economic analysis in understanding both historical events and processes and more contemporary issues. See http://www.econfilm.us for a more detailed description.

Meets Social Sciences III-A requirement; 4 credits; enrollment limited to 17; 2 meetings (75 minutes) and 1 film showing (3 hours)

 

GERM 100 (01) THE NEW FACE/S OF GERMANY: CONTEMP GERMAN SOCIETY IN FILM & TEXT

G. Davis TuTh 11:00-12:15pm Ciru 009

First-year seminar (Writing-intensive course)

Taught in English; Film Studies Core Course. In Germany today you will find: cities where much of the population was not born in Germany; 160,000 Turks and fourth-generation Germans of African descent living in Berlin; public schools offering Islamic religious instruction; more Russian Jews emigrating to Germany than to Israel; immigrants of German citizenship who do not know German; East Germans longing for the return of the Wall. Recent German film has represented these diverse faces of Germany, often through comedy. Focus on close analyses of several films, their socio-historical, economic, and cultural contexts. Films to include: Goodbye Lenin, In July, Yasemin, Journey of Hope, Ali--Fear Eats the Soul.

Meets multicultural requirement; meets Humanities I-A requirement; Prereq. Course taught in English; no knowledge of German required; 4 credits; enrollment limited to 25; 2 meetings (75 minutes)

 

PHIL 275 PHILOSOPHY AND FILM

TTh 11:00-12:15pm & T 7-10pm (screening) Skinner 216

T. Wartenberg

An exploration of philosophical issues encountered in the study of film. Why do we need a theory of film? What is a film anyway? Do films have "authors"? How do films engage our emotions? Can films be socially critical? What can we learn from films? These are examples of the topics to be discussed in this course as we investigate the nature of film and its relation to philosophy. There will be weekly required film screenings

Satisfies Humanities I-B requirement; Prereq. 4 credits in department or in Film Studies, or permission of instructor; 4 credits; 2 meetings (75 minutes), 1 screening (3 hours)

 

SPAN 221 INTRO TO SPANISH & LATIN AMERICAN FILM

J. Crumbaugh TuTh 11:00-12:15pm Rees 324

(Speaking- and writing-intensive course) This course offers a broad introduction to the history, politics and aesthetics of Latin American and Spanish cinema in the context of, and in contrast with, cinemas from other regions, especially hegemonic Hollywood aesthetics. This course will also focus specifically on introducing students to the basic terminology and methodologies of film analysis, thus preparing them for the department's film seminar (Spanish 320) and other advanced courses in Film Studies.

Meets multicultural requirement; meets Language requirement or Humanities I-A requirement; Prereq. Spanish 212 or permission by the instructor; 4 credits; enrollment limited to 16; 2 meetings (75 minutes)

 

Part III: * Mount Holyoke Film Component Courses [please check course restrictions for Film Studies program(s) at your home campus]

 

*ENGL 320 JANE AUSTEN: READINGS IN FICTION & FILM

*Film-Component course only

J. Lemly Tu 1:00-3:50 Kndd 107

A study of Austen's six novels through the lenses of Regency culture and of twentieth-century filmmakers. How do these modest volumes reflect and speak to England at the end of world war, on the troubled verge of Pax Britannica? What do the recent films say to and about Anglo-American culture at the millennium? What visions of women's lives, romance, and English society are constructed through the prose and the cinema?

Meets Humanities I-A requirement; Prereq. jr, sr, 8 credits in English/Film studies beyond 101; prior work in eighteenth- to nineteenth-century literature, history, or film recommended; students should have read at least two Austen novels; 4 credits; enrollment limited to 15; 1 meeting (3 hours) plus screenings; satisfies English department 1700-1900 requirement; satisfies English department seminar requirement

*FREN 225 INTRO to CONTEM CULTURE & MEDIA IN FRANCE

*Film-Component course only

C. Rivers MW 11:00-12:15pm Ciru 225

The primary purpose of this course is to familiarize students with contemporary issues in French culture as they are represented in French-speaking media of today.

(Speaking-intensive course) This course will introduce students to contemporary popular culture in France and the French-speaking world, largely through the study of recent (post-1995) best-selling novels, popular music, and feature films. Students will be asked to give formal oral presentations based on up-to-date materials gathered from the Internet and/or French television and to participate actively in class discussion.

Meets Language requirement or Humanities I-A requirement; Prereq. French 203, or placement score of 430+, or department placement; 4 credits; enrollment limited to 16; 2 meetings (75 minutes)

 

*GERM 311 (01) NOSTALGIA & UTOPIA: 19 th CENTURY GERMAN LIT & CULTURE I

*Film-Component course only

G. Davis TuTh 1:15-2:30pm Ciru 009

(Speaking- and writing-intensive course; Film Studies Component Course) This course studies the dramatic cultural and political shifts between the turn of the century and 1848: from the Romantic world view to post-Napoleonic reactionary regression and democratic political activism. Focus on the interrelationship of literature and its social and cultural context, as well as the particular impact of 19th-century thought on 20th-century writers and filmmakers. Short fiction, poetry, and drama by such authors as Büchner, von Droste-Hülshoff, Hebbel, Heine, Kleist, Stifter, and von Ense; modern theatre and film adaptations by Kroetz, Fassbinder, and Stein.

Meets Language requirement or Humanities I-A requirement; Prereq. Open to students who have previously studied German and per permission of department.; 4 credits; 2 meetings (75 minutes)

 

*RELIG 213 RELIGION & FILM

*Film-Component course only

H. Atchley MW 11:00-12:15pm and T 1:00-3:50pm (screening) Rees 307/Clap 225

This course is an investigation of the intersections between film and religion. In it, we will examine how the cultural phenomenon of religion is represented in film and how religion, understood critically and theoretically, can be a useful means to interpret film. We will learn the basic issues inherent in the interpretation of this art form (e.g., How do the visual, aural, and narrative components of film work together to create meaning?), and we will critically investigate the concept of religion as a means to better understanding the significance of cultural practice (e.g., What is religion? What are the myriad ways it is made manifest in culture?).

Meets Humanities I-B requirement; 4 credits; 2 meetings (75 min);1 screening (110 min)