MOUNT HOLYOKE COLLEGE

FILM STUDIES 201F  INTRODUCTION TO FILM
Meeting Times: TUTH 8:35-9:50 and TU 7-9 (FILM SCR) ( 220 Art 220 Art )
R. Blaetz
4 credits; 2 meetings (75 minutes), 1 screening (2 1/2 hours)
This course teaches the basic concepts and critical skills involved in interpreting film. Through lecture, reading, discussion, and screening of films both in and outside of class, the student will become a more informed and sophisticated observer of the cinema. During the first half of the semester, the class will study form and style in narrative film as well as in nonnarrative practices such as avant-garde and documentary filmmaking. For the remainder of the course, the class will examine some of the major critical approaches in the field.

FILM STUDIES 210F  PRODUCTION SEMINAR ON THE MOVING IMAGE
Meeting Times: W 1-3:50 and TU 7-9 PM (FILM SCR) ( 101 Dwigt 101 Dwigt )
A. Steuernagel
4 credits; enrollment limited to 15; 1 meeting (3 hours), 1 screening (3 hours); a lab fee may be charged
This course offers an introductory exploration into the moving image as an art form outside of the conventions of the film and television industries. This class will cover technical and aesthetic aspects of video production and will also offer a theoretical and historical context in which to think about independent cinema and video art. Satisfies Humanities I-A requirement

FILM STUDIES 230F DOCUMENTARY FILM
Meeting Times MW 11-12:15 and TU 7-9 (FILM SCR) ( 220 Art 221 Art )
R. Blaetz
Prereq. Film Studies 201 or permission of instructor; 4 credits; 2 meetings
(75 minutes) plus 1 screening (2 1/2 hours)
This course examines the principles, methods, and styles of nonfiction film.  Beginning with the "actualités" of film history's first practitioners and ending with contemporary self-reflexive films, such as Errol Morris's The Thin Blue Line, the class studies films that strive to represent some aspect of the real world as opposed to the fictional worlds of narrative cinema.

ITALIAN 215F  CINEMA AND LITERATURE: AN INTERTEXTUAL APPROACH TO ITALIAN CULTURE AND SOCIETY
Meeting Times MW 1:15-2:30 and + 1 MTG UNAR
F. Santovetti
4 credits; 2 meetings (75 minutes), unarranged screenings
 (Taught in English) This course looks at the participation of Italian writers and filmmakers in the public discussion of such controversial themes in modern Italian culture and society as diversity and sexual discrimination, the failure of
Italian unification and the condition of the South, conformity and resistance to Fascism, the making of the modern hero/heroine, and the crisis of identity. Authors will include C. Levi, Sciascia, Brancati, Moravia, and Tarchetti; the
directors Rosi, Amelio, Bolognini, Bertolucci, and Scola. Secondary readings on cultural studies, film theory, narratology, and script writing will also form part of the syllabus.

ITALIAN 315F CINEMA AND LITERATURE: AN INTERTEXTUAL APPROACH TO ITALIAN CULTURE AND SOCIETY
Meeting Times MW 1:15-2:30 and + 1 MTG UNAR
F. Santovetti
Prereq. Italian 221 or permission of instructor; 4 credits; 2 meetings (75 minutes) plus tutorial (1 hour)
Students enrolling in this course (Italian 315) attend the class meetings of Italian 215 (see "Courses in Translation") and in addition must enroll in a one-hour tutorial, which is lecture/discussion in Italian. All work and readings are in Italian.

PHILOSOPHY 375F PHILOSOPHY OF FILM
Meeting Times M 1-3:50 and W 7-9:30 SCREEN
T. Wartenberg
Prereq. 8 credits in department or in film studies or permission of instructor; 4 credits; 2 hour and screening
Philosophers tend to see films as works of art, whereas film theorists tend to emphasize the economic, cultural, and ideological context of their production.  This course will examine the differences between these two approaches to
film, seeking to determine the distinctive aspects of each. Readings will be drawn from a variety of sources including contemporary philosophers of film, feminist philosophers and film theorists, and aestheticians.
Fall 2003: SCREENING PHILOSOPHY This seminar will focus on the questions of whether films can philosophize and, if so, how. Films such as THE MATRIX and ALIEN will be screened and then analyzed with the assistance of philosophical texts and interpretations. Basic issues in the philosophy of film also will be addressed, such as how viewers engage with film.

RELATED/COMPONENT COURSES only (Do not count towards the UMASS film certificate):

ART (HISTORY) 360F (01)  SEMINAR IN ASIAN ART:  VISUAL CULTURES OF SOUTH ASIA
Meeting Times: TU 1-3:50, Occasional screenings M 7-11pm)
A. Sinha
Prereq. jr, sr, or permission of instructor; 8 credits in art history, asian studies, or film studies, or permission of instructor; 4 credits; enrollment limited to 15; 1meeting (3 hours), occasional screenings
The seminar is designed as a series of case studies for understanding the social life of visual images in South Asia. Our central problem will be to develop an analytical vocabulary to describe making, seeing, disfiguring, and reproducing visual and material things as modes of history. Student-led discussions and research papers will explore topics ranging from the making and breaking of stone monuments in ancient (and modern) periods to the magical realism of such modern media as photography, mass-produced calendar prints, and commercial cinema.

CLASSICS 212 GREEK TRAGEDY AND FILM
Meeting Times: TuTh 1:15-2:30, screening M 7:30-9:30
Bruce Arnold
Description not yet available.

ENGLISH 320F , THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY: JANE AUSTEN: READINGS IN FICTION AND FILM
Meeting Times M 1-3:50
J. Lemly
Prereq. jr, sr, 8 credits in English/Film Studies beyond 101; prior work in eighteenth- to nineteenth-century literature, history, or film recommended; students should have read at least two Austen novels; 4 credits; enrollment limited to 20; 1 meeting (3 hours)
A study of Austen's six novels through the lenses of Regency culture and of twentieth-century filmmakers. How do these modest volumes reflect and speak to England at the end of world war, on the troubled verge of Pax Britannica? What do the recent films say to and about Anglo-American culture at the millennium? What visions of women's lives, romance, and English society are constructed through the prose and the cinema?

GERMAN 100 (01)f  First-Year Seminar Fall 2003 (taught in English)
“Shoot the Women First”: Re/Viewing Terrorism and Resistance through Images and Films
Prof. Davis TuTh  8:35-9:50  2 meetings (75 minutes)
Art can be a powerful instrument of resistance against terrorism.  To test this hypothesis, we will “read” films, multimedia, and texts, focusing on the stories of individuals involved in acts of terrorism or resistance.  We will “meet” 92-year-old Berlin artist Wolfgang Szepansky, who first used his art as a means of survival in a concentration camp.  In the film The Nasty Girl a young woman struggles to unearth the ugly past of her proper townspeople.  Other films, from the 1970s to 2002, focus on the urban guerilla terrorists of the RAF and their links to Palestinian fighters and the Secret Police in East Germany: The Lost Honor of Katharina Blum, The Legend of Rita Vogt. Additional meetings occasionally for special events or joint sessions with other seminars on related topics.  Members of this course are invited to participate in a January Term class in Berlin, Germany.  Members of the seminar will participate in joint sessions related to the Pontigny series sponsored by the Weissman Center for Leadership.  Satisfies Humanities I-A requirement.  4 credits.

GERMAN 241f and s  Special Topics in German Studies
Topic for Fall 2003: BunTesrepublik Deutschland?: Representations of Afro-Germans and Turkish (Im)migrants in Film and Literature
Prof. Daviss TuTh 11-12:15 2 meetings  (75 minutes) 4 credits
Introduces cultural, social, economic, and political developments in the German-speaking countries from the Middle Ages to the present. Topics include German regional culture and language; art, architecture, and music; women, gender, and family relations; the experience of work and leisure time; contemporary East-West relations; and film studies. Labs help students express themselves in culturally and situationally appropriate ways and develop contextual reading comprehension skills. Requires oral reports, short papers, and exams.  Who are “the Germans”?  We will study Germany as an evolving multicultural society with members from diverse racial, ethnic, religious, and cultural backgrounds.  By analyzing films, literary and expository writings, we will investigate the histories and listen to voices of Afro-Deutsche and Turkish (im)migrants.  We will examine such concepts as national, individual, and gender identity, Heimat, Zuwanderung, Ausländer, Migrant, Immigrant, and Asylant, and discuss German, and EU, immigration and citizenship laws.  Authors and films include: May Ayim, Saliha Scheinhardt, Emine Sevai Özdamar; Ich wollte schon immer blond sein auf der Haut; Ali--Angst essen Seele auf; Journey of Hope; Im Juli.
Satisfies language requirement or Humanities I-A requirements. Note: This course fulfills the College’s Multicultural Perspectives requirement.  Prereq  German L201, 3 or 4 admission units, or permission of department;