HAMPSHIRE COLLEGE

Five College Film & Video Course Guide

SPRING 2011

(updated 11/18/2010)

(All courses 4 credits unless otherwise noted.  Course information may be subject to change.) 

HACU 108 INTRODUCTION TO MEDIA PRODUCTION:  A LENS ON SOCIAL ACTION
Julien Rosskam
TH 9-11:50, JLC 120                                                          Open.  Cap 16
This production and theory course will introduce students to basic video, photographic and new media techniques and to a diverse range of critical texts on digital and media theory, film theory and the ethics of representation.   Production work will include photo and video essays, and a data visualization project (using Processing).  At the crux of our inquiry will be the use of media/art for social action.  Students will consider who they are in relation to what they are representing, as well as how each medium frames their subject differently. There is a lab fee of $50 charged for the course.  EXP, MCP, PRJ, REA, WRI
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  8

HACU 120 THE ANATOMY OF PICTURES:  VISUAL CULTURES
Lorne Falk
M 2:30-5:20pm, FPH Seminar 103                            Open. Cap 24
Images dominate our cultural imaginations with such intensity some cultural theorists describe their affect in pathological terms: “the hypertrophy of visual stimulation” (Martin Jay), “a topographical amnesia” (Paul Virilio), “excremental culture” (Arthur and Mary Louise Kroker), “our narcotic modernity” (Avital Ronell). Other critics say the explosion of visual cultures is so influential that it represents a paradigm shift—that is, a shift from the domination of language to the domination of images over our lives. This course will examine the theoretical, social and cultural issues and contexts influencing the formation of visual culture, by dissecting specific examples from contemporary photography, film, new media and other visual media that problematize visuality. The implications of new models of spectatorship and visual literacy will also be considered. REA, WRI, PRS, PRJ, MCP
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIA, V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  6

HACU 209 VIDEO I:  BLACK VISION/QUEER LOOKS
Kara Lynch
T 9-11:50, JLC 131 and TH 7-9pm screening, JLC 131        Lab Fee  PreReq            Cap 16
Video I is an introductory video production course.  Over the course of the semester students will gain experience in pre-production, production and post-production techniques as well as learn to think and look critically about the making of the moving image.  We will engage with video as a specific visual medium for expression, and we will apply black studies + queer theory and practice as a lens and sounding board in relation to issues of representation, spectatorship, identification, practice and distribution. Projects are designed to develop basic technical proficiency in the video medium as well as the necessary working skills and mental discipline so important to a successful working process.  Final production projects will experiment with established media genres.  Readings, screenings, In-class critiques and discussion will focus on media analysis and the role of technology in image production.  There is a lab fee charged for the course. Prerequisite: 100 level course in media arts (Introduction to Media Arts, Introduction to Media Production, Introduction to Digital Photography & New Media, or equivalent).
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  8

HACU 210 FILM I
Abraham Ravett
W 9-11:50, JLC 131 and W 7-10pm, JLC120            Lab Fee      PreReq             Cap16
This course teaches the basic skills of film production, including camera work, editing, sound recording, and preparation and completion of a finished work in film and video. Students will submit weekly written responses to theoretical and historical readings and to screenings of films and videotapes, which represent a variety of aesthetic approaches to the moving image. There will be a series of filmmaking assignments culminating in an individual final project for the class. The development of personal vision will be stressed. The bulk of the work in the class will be produced in 16mm format. Video formats plus digital image processing and non-linear editing will also be introduced. A $50 lab fee provides access to equipment and editing facilities. Students are responsible for providing their own film, tape, processing and supplies. There are weekly evening screenings or workshops. Prerequisite courses include a 100 level course in media arts (Introduction to Media Arts, Introduction to Media Production, Introduction to Digital Photography & New Media, or equivalent and must be completed and not concurrent with this course.) NOTE: Enrolled or top 5 waitlist students who DO NOT attend the first class session risk losing their place on the class roster.
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  8

HACU 252 ADVANCED FILM/VIDEO WORKSHOP II: IMAG(IN)ING TRANSGENDER
Julien Rosskam
W 9-11:50, JLC 120 and T 7-9pm screening, JLC 120      LabFee   InstPerm      Cap 16
In this hybrid theory and production course students will be introduced to foundational film theories (Mary Ann Doane, Robin Wood) that relate to how gender and bodies are represented. Additionally we'll explore trans theories (Susan Stryker, David Valentine, Jay Prosser), that relate to larger ideas of
what bodies even are, how we define and categorize them, and whether or not film/video can do justice to the trans/gender-variant/intersex body. Prerequisite: Film I or Video I. Instructor permission required. There will be weekly screenings for this class. There is a Lab Fee of $50.
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  8

HACU 268 “MAKING HISTORY” OR PRODUCING NON-FICTION IN FILM AND VIDEO
Joan Braderman
T 12:30-3:20, JLC 120 and M 7-9 screening , JLC 120                      InstPerm    Cap 16
“If anthropology is fundamentally, in the words of Margaret Mead, “a discipline of words,” then documentary, is, most fundamentally, a discipline of visual representation…it calls for an ethics of responsibility, an aesthetics of film form, and a politics of representation.”--Bill Nichols, “Documenting the Documentary.”
 “What ‘truth’ does a ‘documentary’ reveal?  The answer is far simpler than it might seem.  The “truth” revealed is that someone or something turned on a camera somewhere and light was inscribed in an electronic or digital signal or on nitrate.  These marks in light may resemble something familiar -- but it is always a new space made by the light so imprinted or registered on its new plane.   Once this light, this so-called “image” has been ripped out of time by the camera, it exists only as an abstract etching, imitating the light of its source. ” “Toward the Essay Film,” by Joan B.
Reading about non-fiction, analyzing and comparing fiction with non-fiction works and making films and videos, we will explore the above ideas and others, especially those related to the specific filmmaking processes and stages of production when working on location.  Students must have some background in film or videomaking in the context of a course and will be expected to produce original works in these mediums.  Instructor permission required. Lab Fee $50.
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  8

HACU 269 JAPANESE CINEMA
Abraham Ravett
Fri 9-12,  JLC 120 and F 1-3 screening, JLC 120                  Open.  Cap 25
"I think that to find what is real one must look very closely at one's world, to search for those things which contribute to this reality which one feels under the surface. These are few and one uses them to create. These are the core around which the world moves, the axis around which it turns...To be an artist means to search for, find, and look at these things; to be an artist means never to avert one's eyes."--Akira Kurosawa
"I want to portray a man's character by eliminating all the dramatic devices. I want to make people feel what life is like without delineating all the dramatic ups and downs. "--Yasujiro Ozu
"My films do not treat sensational events or, for that matter, contain much drama. Depicted are images of everyday Japan and the daily lives of its people."--Sumiko Haneda
This course will involve a detailed study of the Japanese cinema. It will highlight works in the dramatic narrative, documentary and experimental traditions. The films screened will use the past to explore the meaning of the present, examine the relationships within families, investigate formal issues in cinematic construction and attempt to articulate broader social issues within Japanese society. Class will meet once a week for two hours and fifty minutes plus additional time for second screenings. Participants will be asked to complete a series of papers plus a final project based on class discussions, film screenings, and assigned readings.
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  5

HACU 277 CONTEMPORARY AUSTRALIAN & NEW ZEALAND CINEMA
Eva Rueschmann
W 2:30-5:20, FPH 106 and M 6:30-9:30 screening, ELH-Scr
From the Australian Film Renaissance of the 1970s represented by such directors as Peter Weir, Fred Shepisi and Gillian Armstrong to the Lord of the Rings trilogy and Rabbit Proof Fence, Australian and New Zealand have made a unique impact on international cinema. In this course, we will examine the ways in which selected films (features, shorts and independent film) from both countries engage with issues and themes involving national identity, race, history, myth, landscape and the ability of two small film cultures to survive the economic and cultural dominance of Hollywood. Our weekly film screenings will be supplemented by a discussion of short stories, poems and a novel in order to situate Australian and New Zealand cinema within a broader cultural, historical and political framework.
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  5

HACU 282 THEORY/PRACTICE:  IMMEDIATE SITE—TIME-BASED MEDIA INSTALLATION
Kara Lynch
M 7-10pm, JLC 131                                  PreReq            Cap 16
This course will focus on installation and performance in conversation with diverse media: video, digital, audio, photo, film, and the plastic arts. The thematic focus of the seminar will critically engage issues of technology, vision, and site. Also of importance is the nature of video as electronic technology and the relationship of immediacy that it has with both performance and installation. This is a rigorous theory/practice workshop class designed specifically for upper division students. In this seminar, students will develop their skills within their specific media and work collaboratively throughout the semester to produce work that engages questions of site, space, time, experience and vision within an historical context.  We will challenge traditional modes of production and presentation collectively. Students will focus in on their critical skills and be required to produce written responses, two visual projects, and a research project/presentation. This course will encourage students to broaden their perspective of artistic production.  This will be a challenging course for serious students in the media arts.
Prerequisites:  1 intro media production course or equivalent, any introductory course in digital, visual, media, or performing arts and/or creative writing; 1 critical or cultural studies course; recommended: 1 200 level course in either the humanities or social sciences.
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  8

HACU 299 DIVISION II INDEPENDENT PROJECTS IN FILM, PHOTOGRAPHY, VIDEO AND INSTALLATION
Joan Braderman
W 6-9pm, JLC 131                              PreReq            Cap 16
This course will provide an opportunity for Division II students in film/video, photography and related media that wish to pursue their own work, creating at least one completed new project for inclusion in the Division II portfolio. Each student will be required to present his/her work to the group several times during the semester. The members of the workshop will provide critical, technical and crew support for one another. Team projects are supported as long as each participant has a distinct and responsible role in the making of that work. Technical workshops will be offered where necessary. However, prior to joining the workshop, students must have some level of mastery over his/her medium as well as course evaluations in prerequisite areas. We will unpack the conceptual process of creating and realizing new works.  Readings, screenings and museum/gallery visits, which address the specific problems faced by class members in developing the works-in-progress, will contribute to the overall experience of the workshop. All of these activities including active verbal contributions to all sessions are required of each student under the guiding principle that tracking each other's intellectual and creative process will help each person develop their respective project. A lab fee of $50 covers the use of Hampshire’s equipment plus film/video rentals. This course provides a structured context in which to do independent work at the Division II-level.
Prerequisites: evaluations from at least two courses in a related discipline. NOTE:  Enrolled or top 5 waitlist students who DO NOT attend the first class session risk losing their place on the class roster. Instructor Permission Required.
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  8

HACU 399 FILM/PHOTOGRAPHY/VIDEO STUDIES SEMINAR
Baba Hillman, Jacqueline Hayden
W 1-5pm, JLC 120 & 131                   LabFee Div III only            InstPerm                     Cap 40
Film/Photography/Video Studies Seminar: This course is open to film, photography and video concentrators in Division III and others by consent of the instructor. The class will attempt to integrate the procedural and formal concentration requirements of the College with the creative work produced by each student. It will offer a forum for meaningful criticism, exchange, and exposure to each other. In addition, various specific kinds of group experience will be offered, including lectures and critiques by guest artists. The course will include discussions of post- graduate options and survival skills including tips on exhibition and distribution, and graduate school applications. There will be a $50 lab fee. Enrollment is limited to Division III concentrators; contracts must have been filed prior to enrollment. All others must have permission of the instructor. NOTE: Enrolled or top 5 waitlist students who do not attend the first class session risk losing their place on the class roster. Instructor permission required.
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IV, V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  8

CS 222 PIXELBENDING
Christopher Perry       
TUTH 09:00AM-11:50AM, Adele Simmons Hall 126
With an affordable digital camera and simple editing software, anyone can be an image maker. But what does it take to be an image master? How does one take control over the images and films one makes rather than ceding it to the engineers of the software and hardware? This course is designed for students who seek mastery over the digital images they create, capture, edit, and/or distribute. The class will expose the foundational core that hides behind the interfaces of digital imaging and filmmaking technologies but which is crucial to using them with precision and finesse. Topics that may be covered include digital image representation, compression/decompression (codecs), frame rate changes, compositing, matting, tracking, color correction, color grading, and more. Prerequisite: an evaluation/passing grade from least one digital media production class (film, video, animation, photography).
This course has unspecified prerequisite(s) - please see the instructor.
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  8