HAMPSHIRE COLLEGE

Five College Film & Video Course Guide

SPRING 2010  (updated 01/20/10)

 

 

HACU 109  INTRO TO MEDIA PRODUCTION: TOO BIG FOR WORDS

Bill Brand

09:00AM-11:50AM TH;07:00PM-09:00PM T , Jerome Liebling Center 131;Jerome Liebling Center 120 

This course is an introduction to the theory, history and practice of media production looking particularly at how images “speak” beyond words. Students will explore fundamentals of creative production in film, video, sound, and photography.  While students are introduced to some practical tools of media art production, an equal emphasis is placed on understanding the social, historical and aesthetic conditions that create meaning in a work of art. Students will be expected to demonstrate that they are learning not only how to make media, but how to engage with the form critically and creatively. Motivations and trajectories from activism to the avant-garde will be explored through readings, viewings as well as visual and written assignments. This course is a pre-requisite for Video I, Film I or Photo I. There is a $50 lab fee charged for the course. EXP, PRJ,PRS,REA, WRI

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  8

 

HACU 153  SUBJECTIVITY AND /OR DIVERSITY:  FIRST-PERSON NARRATIVE IN FILM

Jean-Marie Teno

09:00AM-11:50AM W; 07:00PM-09:00PM M , Jerome Liebling Center 131;Jerome Liebling Center 120   

Over the past decades, personal video diaries have become part of everyday life. The first person narrative has become a familiar tool for Avant-garde filmmakers as well as for directors making commercial narrative films. Looking at fiction and non-fiction films, this course will explore the filmmakers' strategies and the questions raised by their role as the Narrator vis ą vis  their story and their public. Do first person narratives in film bring us a better understanding of complex issues or are they just a way for the author to impose a personal point of view that can contribute to perverting or concealing the truth?

Students will be expected to write a response journal on screenings and readings. One short and one longer essay will be required. We will see films by filmmakers such as:  Chris Marker (Sans Soleil), Agnes Varda (Les Glaneurs et la Glaneuse), Ross McElwee (Sherman's March),Oshima (Kyoto, My Mother's House), Zeka Laplaine (Kinshasa Palace), Marcos Arriaga (Promised Land), Kidlat Tahimik (Perfumed Nightmare), Terence Malik (Badlands), Jean-Luc Godard (Histoires Du Cinema), Guiseppe Tornatore (New Cinema Paradiso), Jean-Marie Teno. MCP, REA, WRI.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIA, V

Five College Film Studies Major category: 6

 

HACU 155  INTRO TO FILM STUDIES: THE HISTORY OF AMERICAN CINEMA  1895-1960

Lise Sanders;Eva Rueschmann           

10:30AM-11:50AM T,TH;07:00PM-09:00PM M ,  Franklin Patterson Hall WLH;Adele Simmons Hall 112 

This course is designed to introduce students to key issues in film studies, focusing on the history of American cinema from 1895 to 1960. We will pay particular attention to the "golden age" of Hollywood, with forays into other national cinemas by way of comparison and critique. Screenings will range from actualities and trick films, to the early narrative features of D. W. Griffith and Cecil B. DeMille, to the development of genres including film noir (Double Indemnity), the woman's film of the 1940s (Now, Voyager), the western (Stagecoach) and the suspense film (Rear Window, Vertigo, Psycho). Several short papers and in-class discussions will address how to interpret film on the formal/stylistic level (sequence analysis, close reading, visual language) as well as in the context of major trends and figures in film history. REA, WRI, PRS 

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  I, IIB

Five College Film Studies Major category: 1, 5

 

HACU 209  VIDEO I

Joan Braderman

12:30PM-03:20PM T;12:30PM-03:20PM TH , Jerome Liebling Center 131;Jerome Liebling Center 120 

This is an introductory video production course. Over the course of the semester students will gain experience in pre- production, production, and post-production techniques as well as learn to think and look critically about the making of the moving image.  Projects are designed to develop basic technical proficiency in the video medium as well as the necessary working skills and mental discipline so important to a successful working process.  Final production projects will experiment with established media genres. In-class critiques and discussion will focus on media analysis and image/sound relationships.  A $50 lab fee provides access to equipment and editing facilities. Students are responsible for providing their own film, tape, processing and supplies. There are weekly evening screenings or workshops, which students must attend. Prerequisite courses include a 100-level course in media arts (Introduction to Media Arts, Introduction to Media). NOTE:  Enrolled or top 5 waitlist students who DO NOT attend the first class session risk losing their place on the class roster.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  8

 

HACU 210 FILM WORKSHOP I

Bill Brand

09:00AM-11:50AM W;07:00PM-09:00PM M , Jerome Liebling Center 120;Jerome Liebling Center 120

This course teaches the basic skills of film production, including camera work, editing, sound recording, and preparation and completion of a finished work in film and video. Students will submit weekly written responses to theoretical and historical readings and to screenings of films and videotapes, which represent a variety of aesthetic approaches to the moving image. There will be a series of filmmaking assignments culminating in an individual final project for the class. The development of personal vision will be stressed. The bulk of the work in the class will be produced in 16mm format. Video formats plus digital image processing and non-linear editing will also be introduced. A $50 lab fee provides access to equipment and editing facilities. Students are responsible for providing their own film, tape, processing and supplies. There are weekly evening screenings or workshops. Prerequisite courses include a 100 level course in media arts (Introduction to Media Arts, Introduction to Media Production, Introduction to Digital Photography & New Media, or equivalent and must be completed and not concurrent with this course.) NOTE: Enrolled or top 5 waitlist students who DO NOT attend the first class session risk losing their place on the class roster.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  8

 

HACU 255  MEDIA PRODUCTION II: DOCUMENTARY PRACTICE

Jean-Marie Teno

12:30PM-03:20PM T;07:00PM-09:00PM M , Jerome Liebling Center 120;Jerome Liebling Center 120      

This course is an intermediate level class that concentrates on non-fiction media production. The course will interrogate the documentary format and expand the definition while introducing students to techniques and strategies for getting their non-fiction projects from concept to completion. Working individually or in small groups students will produce works across various media: video, film, audio, digital new media, and installation. Students are expected to complete a series of media production exercises as well as a semester-long final project.  Students are also expected to attend screenings, absorb theoretical, historical and technical readings, and complete one analytical essay. This course is open by instructor permission to advanced film, photography and video students who have completed either Video I, Film I, Photo I or the equivalent. A $50 lab fee provides access to equipment and editing facilities. Students are responsible for providing their own film, tape, processing and supplies. NOTE: Enrolled students who DO NOT attend the first class session risk losing their place on the class roster.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  8

 

HACU 282  THEORY PRACTICE--IMMEDIATE SITE--VIDEO/SOUND INSTALLATION + PERFORMANCE

Kara Lynch

06:00PM-09:00PM T , Jerome Liebling Center 131 

This course will focus on installation and performance in conversation with diverse media: video, digital, audio, photo, film, and the plastic arts. The thematic focus of the seminar will critically engage issues of technology, vision, and site. Also of importance is the nature of video as electronic technology and the relationship of immediacy that it has with both performance and installation. This is a rigorous theory/practice workshop class designed specifically for upper division students. In this seminar, students will develop their skills within their specific media and work collaboratively throughout the semester to produce work that engages questions of site, space, time, experience and vision within an historical context.  We will challenge traditional modes of production and presentation collectively. Students will focus in on their critical skills and be required to produce written responses, two visual projects, and a research project/presentation. This course will encourage students to broaden their perspective of artistic production.  This will be a challenging course for serious students in the media arts. Prerequisites:  1 intro media production course or equivalent, any introductory course in digital, visual, media, or performing arts and/or creative writing; 1 critical or cultural studies course; recommended: 1 200 level course in either the humanities or social sciences. Instructor permission required.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  8

 

HACU287  FRENCH CINEMA:  PARIS/CITISCAPE

“PARIS & THE BANLIEUES:  CITYSCAPE & DIASPORA IN FRENCH & FRANCOPHONE CINEMA “

Baba Hillman

01:00PM-03:50PM M;07:00PM-09:00PM M , Jerome Liebling Center 120;Jerome Liebling Center 120 

This bilingual film production/theory course will address changing cinematic representations of the architecture and urban space of Paris and the surrounding suburbs. We will consider shifting representations of the city and the body of the performer in the films of Feuillade, Vigo, Rivette, Prévert, Cantet, Denis, Kechiche and Volta. We will analyze performances of identities, emphasizing the body as the primary site of a daily negotiation of language and culture. Students will be encouraged to question how performative languages of movement, architecture and speech function as aesthetic systems that reflect the ways in which the body is coded in terms of gender, race and class. The course will include a study of articles from Présence Africaine, Trafic, Cahiers du Cinéma and Bref, as well as works by Petrine Archer-Straw, Carrie Tarr and Etienne Balibar. The course will engage students in ongoing work to develop their speaking and writing skills in French. Students will complete two film or video projects. Instructor Permission Required. Prerequisites: Intro to Media, Film I or Video I.  Lab Fee $50.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, V

Five College Film Studies Major category: 6, 8

 

HACU 299  DIVISION II INDEP. PROJECTS IN FILM, PHOTOGRAPHY, VIDEO AND INSTALLATION

Joan Braderman

06:00PM-09:00PM W , Jerome Liebling Center 131               

This course will provide an opportunity for Division II students in film/video, photography and related media that wish to pursue their own work, creating at least one completed new project for inclusion in the Division II portfolio. Each student will be required to present his/her work to the group several times during the semester. The members of the workshop will provide critical, technical and crew support for one another. Team projects are supported as long as each participant has a distinct and responsible role in the making of that work. Technical workshops will be offered where necessary. However, prior to joining the workshop, students must have some level of mastery over his/her medium as well as course evaluations in prerequisite areas. We will unpack the conceptual process of creating and realizing new works.  Readings, screenings and museum/gallery visits, which address the specific problems faced by class members in developing the works-in-progress, will contribute to the overall experience of the workshop. All of these activities including active verbal contributions to all sessions are required of each student under the guiding principle that tracking each other's intellectual and creative process will help each person develop their respective project. A lab fee of $50 covers the use of Hampshire’s equipment plus film/video rentals. This course provides a structured context in which to do independent work at the Division II-level.

Prerequisites: evaluations from at least two courses in a related discipline. NOTE:  Enrolled or top 5 waitlist students who DO NOT attend the first class session risk losing their place on the class roster. Instructor Permission Required.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  8

 

HACU 399  FILM/PHOTOGRAPHY/VIDEO STUDIES SEMINAR

Kara Lynch and Robert Seydel

01:00PM-05:00PM W;01:00PM-05:00PM W , Jerome Liebling Center 131;Jerome Liebling Center 120 

This course is open to film, photography and video concentrators in Division III and others by consent of the instructor. The class will attempt to integrate the procedural and formal concentration requirements of the College with the creative work produced by each student. It will offer a forum for meaningful criticism, exchange, and exposure to each other. In addition, various specific kinds of group experience will be offered, including lectures and critiques by guest artists and professionals and workshops in advanced techniques. The course will include discussions of post- graduate options and survival skills including tips on fundraising, exhibition and distribution, and graduate school applications. There will be a $50 lab fee. Enrollment is limited to Division III concentrators; contracts must have been filed prior to enrollment. All others must have permission of the instructor. NOTE:  Enrolled or top 5 waitlist students who DO NOT attend the first class session risk losing their place on the class roster.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  V

Five College Film Studies Major category:  8