HAMPSHIRE COLLEGE

CS-0174-1 (119971)  COMPUTER ANIMATION I: COLLABORATIVE
Meeting Info 01/28/04 05/14/04 ASH 126 SEM TTH 12:30PM 01:50PM
Faculty J. Elkin  Capacity 15
In this course students will work collaboratively to produce a single, large-scale piece of computer animation. Topics to be covered include scripting, storyboarding, model creation, lighting, surfacing, sound animation and editing. Historical perspectives and the potential future of digital animation will also be explored through readings, in- class viewings, discussion and tutorials. Software to be used will include Lightwave, After Effects, and Photoshop. This course will be taught in conjunction with CS 334. Students enrolled at the 334 level will take leadership roles, but all students will be involved in all aspects of the project and all students should expect to devote substantial time to the project outside of class. There are no prerequisites for students at the 174 level; students at the 334 level should have completed Animation II (or equivalent) and must obtain instructor permission. PRJ
 
CS-0334-1 (119973)  COMPUTER ANIMATION III
Note(s) Crosslisted with CS-0174-1
Meeting Info 01/28/04 05/14/04 ASH 126 CRS TTH 12:30PM 01:50PM
Faculty J. Elkin  Capacity 25
In this course students will work collaboratively to produce a single, large-scale piece of computer animation. Topics to be covered include scripting, storyboarding, model creation, lighting, surfacing, sound animation and editing. Historical perspectives and the potential future of digital animation will also be explored through readings, in- class viewings, discussion and tutorials. Software to be used will include Lightwave, After Effects, and Photoshop. This course will be taught in conjunction with CS 174. Students enrolled at the 334 level will take leadership roles, but all students will be involved in all aspects of the project and all students should expect to devote substantial time to the project outside of class. There are no prerequisites for students at the 174 level; students at the 334 level should have completed Animation II (or equivalent) and must obtain instructor permission.

HACU-0108-1 (120061)  INTRODUCTION TO MEDIA PRODUCTION
Meeting Info 01/28/04 05/14/04 PFB CLASS SEM W 07:00PM 10:00PM
 01/28/04 05/14/04 ASH 112 SCR T 06:30PM 08:30PM
Faculty L. Waters  Capacity 16
In this course, the learning of basic skills and techniques of media (video) production will be grounded in a larger discussion of the historical contexts, forms and functions of media culture. As celluloid film is just over a century old, commercial video, i.e. "TV" a half-century, and "video art" and the personal camcorder but a quarter century, the language of media production is in its infancy compared to the longevity of human consciousness and communication practices. In the range of production contexts in this country, the college-level video production course is a site where some of the freshest and innovative ways of "speaking" this medium get done. As we learn basic production techniques, they will be situated in their historical contexts be it commercial, experimental, documentary, performance art, political "guerilla video," community pubic access, etc. In addition to project exercises, a group project will be developed experimenting, exploring and critiquing recent trends in the conjunction of information dispersal and entertainment media. The project will involve use of the Internet in bridging international cultures and in positing live activity with manipulated electronic representation. Though Hampshire's pedagogy emphasizes a highly individualistic learning structure, this course will include a "crew" orientation in which students will be expected to team up with other students for some projects to share production and evaluation processes.

HACU-0110-1 (120065)  INTRO TO FILMMAKING AND PHOTOGRAPHY
Meeting Info 01/28/04 05/14/04 PFB CLASS CRS TH 09:00AM 11:50AM
 01/28/04 05/14/04 PFB CLASS LAB TH 07:00PM 09:00PM
Faculty A. Ravett  Capacity 16
Over the course of the semester students will learn to think about and look critically at the still and moving image, to explore each medium in challenging and imaginative ways,and to gain experience in preproduction, production, and postproduction techniques. Projects are designed to develop basic technical proficiency in analog and digital photography as well as 16mm filmmaking, to explore the principles, possibilities, and limitations of each medium, and to develop the necessary working skills and discipline so important to a successful working process. The development of a foundation in critical analysis and visual literacy in both mediums will be stressed through readings and weekly screenings of films and tapes representing a variety of aesthetic approaches to the moving image as well as a broad overview of historical and contemporary movements in photography. There will be a weekly, two-hour lab and a $50 lab fee. EXP, MCP, PROJ, REA
 
HACU-0126-1 (120093)  INTRODUCTION TO VISUAL CULTURE
Meeting Info 01/28/04 05/14/04 FPH ELH SEM TTH 10:30AM 11:50AM
Faculty S. Levine; E. Rueschmann   Capacity 35
This course forms a multidisciplinary introduction to the study of visual culture and various critical methods for reading visual representations across different media, from fine art, photography, cinema to advertising, illustration, performance, museum display and exhibitions and others. by focusing on how vision becomes a privileged sensory experience and cultural expression of meaning making in the modern and postmodern eras and focusing on the explosion in the visual arts in the 20th century, students will be introduced to such diverse topics as: spectatorship and subjectivity, the archive as site of cultural and visual memory, self-representation and self-fashioning, the influence of mechanical and digital technologies of reproduction on image making, world views, and spatial perception, representations of gender and race in visual media, and the politics of museum display. MCP, PRS, WRI
 
HACU-0209-1 (120051)  VIDEO I  Note(s) Prerequisites Required
Meeting Info 01/28/04 05/14/04 LIB B3B SEM T 12:30PM 03:20PM
Faculty J. Braderman  Capacity 16
Video I is an introductory video production course. Over the course of the semester students will gain experience in pre- production, production, and post-production techniques as well as learn to think and look critically about the making of the moving image. Projects are designed to develop basic technical proficiency in the video medium as well as the necessary working skills and mental discipline so important to a successful working process. Final production projects will experiment with established media genres. In-class critiques and discussion will focus on media analysis and image/sound relationships. Prerequisites: 100 level course in media arts (Introduction to Media Arts, Introduction to Media Production, Introduction to Digital Photography & New Media, or equivalent). There is a lab fee charged for the course.
 
HACU-0210-1 (120054)  FILM I  Note(s) Prerequisites Required
Meeting Info 01/28/04 05/14/04 PFB CLASS SEM F 10:30AM 11:50AM
 01/28/04 05/14/04 PFB CLASS SEM F 01:00PM 02:20PM
 01/28/04 05/14/04 PFB CLASS SCR F 02:30PM 03:50PM
Faculty A. Ravett   Capacity 16
This course teaches the basic skills in film production, including camera work, editing, sound recording, pre-production and post- production of a finished film. Students will have weekly assignments, produce several finished films, and in order to begin the process of realizing their creative goals, encouraged to work in a variety of cinematic forms. Weekly screenings of films and tapes that represent a variety of aesthetic approaches to the moving image will be an integral component of the workshop. Participants will be asked to respond in writing to each screening as well as to the assigned readings. Students are expected to make a commitment to a rigorous schedule that includes independent work plus weekly, evening screenings or workshops. The bulk of the projects will be produced in 16mm film. Video formats plus digital image processing, and non-linear editing will also be introduced. A $50 Lab fee provides access to equipment and editing facilities. Students are responsible for providing their own film, tape, processing, and supplies.Prerequisite: 100 level course in media arts (Introduction to Media Arts, Introduction to Media Production, Introduction to Digital Photography & New Media, or equivalent).

HACU-0211-1 (120055)  STILL PHOTOGRAPHY I Note(s) Prerequisites Required
Meeting Info 01/28/04 05/14/04 PFB CLASS SEM M 06:30PM 09:30PM
Faculty R. Seydel  Capacity 16
This course emphasizes three objectives: first, the acquisition of basic photographic skills, including composition, exposure, processing, and printing; second, familiarity with historical and contemporary movements in photography and the development of visual literacy; third, the deepening and expanding of a personal way of seeing. Students will have weekly shooting and printing assignments and, in addition, will complete a portfolio by the end of the semester. A $50 lab fee is charged for this course. The lab fee provides access to darkroom facilities, laboratory supplies and chemicals, and special equipment and materials. Students must provide their own film, paper, and cameras. Prerequisite: 100 level course in media arts (Introduction to Media Arts, Introduction to Media Production, Introduction to Digital Photography & New Media, or equivalent).
 
HACU-0236-1 (120099)  THE AMERICAN WEST (Crosslisted with SS-0236-1)
Meeting Info 01/28/04 05/14/04 FPH 108 SEM M 01:00PM 03:50PM
Faculty S. Tracy   Capacity 35
The American West has excited the hopes and dreams of generations of Americans who have invested it with our most compelling national myths of conquest, success, and progress. Now, new generations of scholars, writers and artists are reinterpreting that history, discovering "lost" narratives, and writing new stories which reflect the diversity of this multiracial region. Paying special attention to European-American ideas about nature and civilization, individualism and violence, race and gender, we will investigate the political, economic, and social history of the West within the context of its mythic narratives. We will examine and interrogate old and new western movies, novels, and other artifacts to see how these cultural products embody and rework important symbols of American life. We will pay special attention to classic and contemporary Western films, with one class a week devoted to film screening.

HACU-0250-1 (120117) HUMAN LOCOMOTION & THE MOVING IMAGE-VIDEO PRODUCTION
Meeting Info 01/28/04 05/14/04 LIB B6 SEM W 06:00PM 10:00PM
Faculty A. Steuernagel  Capacity 15
This course will focus on innovative ways that human locomotion is represented in film and video. We will read articles and screen work by scientist, choreographers, performing artists, and filmmakers including Marey, Muybridge, Chaplin, Gene Kelly, Maya Deren, Norman Mclaren, Bruce Lee, Yoko Ono, Bruce Connor, and Charles Atlas. Archival footage of sports events and ethnographic film will also be included. We will examine how human movement is translated into animation and other abstractions. We will also explore movement/dance in relation to sound. In addition, we will consider performance/video installation work. Students will be given video production assignments through which they will investigate the challenges of recording pedestrian and performative movement. Prerequisite: an introductory film or video course. Instructor Permission required. Come to first class.
 
HACU-0253-1 (120145)  WRITING FOR FILM AND VIDEO Note(s) Prerequisites Required
Meeting Info 01/28/04 05/14/04 PFB CLASS SEM M 01:00PM 03:50PM
 01/28/04 05/14/04 FPH WLH SCR M 07:00PM 09:00PM
Faculty B. Hillman  Capacity 16
This production/theory class will introduce students to scripts and texts by independent film and videomakers who are working with subjects of exile and migration. These filmmakers are working in hybrid combinations of essayist, poetic, fictional and non-fictional forms that explore the experiences of wanderers and migrants whose relationships to ideas of home, sexuality and gender, continuity of life history, belonging and language are in question. They work in a context of multiple languages and transnational histories and seek to express the rupture of cultural displacement and the ways in which it impacts questions of gender, language and representation. We will study videos and films by Mona Hatoum, Anri Sala, Ricardo Larrain, Ciro Diran, Dominique Cabrera and Kidlat Tahimik among others. Readings by Helene Cixous, Andre Aciman, Guillermo Gomez-Pena, Julia Kristeva and Norma Alarcon. Students will write and shoot two short projects and one longer final project. The course will include workshops in writing for spoken text and visual text as well as workshops in non-linear editing, sound recording, audio mixing on Pro-Tools and lighting. Prerequisites: Introduction to Media, Video I or Film I.
 
HACU-0255-1 (120146)  FILM WORKSHOP II  Note(s) Prerequisites Required
Meeting Info 01/28/04 05/14/04 PFB CLASS SEM W 09:00AM 11:50AM
 01/28/04 05/14/04 PFB CLASS LAB T 07:00PM 09:00PM
Faculty W. Brand   Capacity 16
The course will introduce the basics of 16mm sound-synch including pre-planning (scripting or storyboarding), sound recording, editing and post production finishing. The course will especially focus on 16mm cinematography with special attention to lighting, composition, camera placement, lenses, exposure and film stocks. Analogous issues in electronic cinematography (video) will also be covered. Students will be expected to complete individual projects as well as participate in group exercises. Reading and writing about critical issues is an important part of the course and students will be expected to complete one analytical essay. They will also write responses to the film and video works in documentary, narrative and experimental genres screened during the required evening screening sessions. Workshops in animation, optical printing, video editing, digital imaging and audio mixing will be offered throughout the semester. A $50 lab fee entitles students to use camera and recording equipment, transfer and editing facilities, plus video and computer production and post-production equipment. Students must purchase their own film and pay their own processing fees. Film/Video Workshop I will be considered a prerequisite.
 
HACU-0257-1 (120044)  RELIGION AND FILM Note(s) Prerequisites Required
Meeting Info 01/28/04 05/14/04 FPH 108 SEM TTH 02:00PM 03:20PM
 01/28/04 05/14/04 ASH 112 LAB M 07:00PM 09:00PM
Faculty M. D'Amato  Capacity 25
A number of contemporary films contain more or less explicit messages about the meaning of life and death, the possibility of salvation, the ultimate potential of human existence, and other issues that have traditionally belonged to the domain of religious discourse. In this course we will closely examine some of these films, reading them as texts alongside other texts. That is to say, we will study these films in conjunction with readings of primary and secondary sources on religion. The films examined may include Ghost Dog, The Matrix, and Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, and the readings may include ones on Buddhism, Gnosticism, and Taoism. We will also attempt to introduce ourselves to the growing literature in the area of Religion and Film. The primary aim of this course will be to train ourselves to be more reflective about the religious messages conveyed in contemporary film.

HACU-0278-1 (120084)  TRAVELING IDENTITIES: IMMIGRANTS,EXILES, & SOJOURNERS IN FILM & LIT
Meeting Info 01/28/04 05/14/04 FPH 102 SEM TTH 02:00PM 03:20PM
 01/28/04 05/14/04 ASH 112 LAB T 06:30PM 09:30PM
Faculty E. Rueschmann   Capacity 25
This seminar focuses on the experiences of immigrants, exiles and sojourners, which have inspired a number of contemporary novels, feature films, documentaries, autobiographies, and theoretical debates about cultural identity, place and location. Using cultural studies of travel and displacement, ethnic studies, and psychoanalytic theories of identity as critical frameworks for discussion, we will examine some of the following issues addressed by cinematic, fictional, autobiographical, and theoretical texts on migration and displacement: the complexities of adaptation or resistance to new cultures; culture transfer, hybridity and biculturality; the journey as metaphor, escape, physical ordeal and psychological odyssey; the meanings of nostalgia and home; intergenerational conflicts between tradition and modernity; representations and negotiations of national and ethnic identities; the cultural and psychological consequences of border crossings; and the intersections of language, culture and a sense of self. Additional weekly film and video screenings. Note: This course will be coordinated in conjunction with SS 306 "Globalization and Subjectivity" through some common screenings, discussions and projects.

HACU-0313-1 (120047)  FILM III: SOUND AND MUSIC FOR THE MOVING IMAGE
Meeting Info 01/28/04 05/14/04 PFB CLASS CRS T 12:30PM 03:20PM
Faculty W. Brand  Capacity 16
This course is for advanced film and video students who are prepared to continue developing their own individual projects. Students will be expected to complete individual and group exercises and complete an individual final project or Division III film or video with sound. The course will deal in some depth with the theory and practice of working with sound and music for film including 16mm sound-synch filmmaking, audio recording on location and the set, and post- production editing and mixing. Students will learn to make sound tracks for film and video using Final Cut Pro and Protools. Readings and writing about the theory and history of the subject is an essential aspect of the course. Workshops that give training for using equipment and software will occur outside regularly scheduled class and students who already have experience in music composition, electronic music, or sound recording and mixing are welcome in the course. Students must purchase their own film and tape and must pay their own processing fees. Required screenings and workshops sometimes occur in the evening. There will be a $50 lab fee. Instructor permission required.

HACU-399B-1 (120124) FILM/PHOTO/VIDEO STUDIES SEM  Note(s) Instructor Permission Required
Meeting Info 01/28/04 05/14/04 PFB CLASS SEM W 01:00PM 03:50PM
Faculty B. Hillman; R. Seydel   Capacity 30
This course is open to film and photography concentrators in Division III and others by consent of the instructor. The class will attempt to integrate the procedural and formal concentration requirements of the College with the creative work produced by each student. It will offer a forum for meaningful criticism, exchange, and exposure to each other. In addition, various specific kinds of group experience will be offered: field trips to museums, galleries, and other environments; a guest lecture and workshop series; and encounters with student concentrators, teachers, and professionals who are in the other visual arts or related endeavors. There will be a $50 lab fee. Enrollment is limited to Division III concentrators; contracts must have been filed prior to enrollment. All others must have permission of the instructor.

HAMPSHIRE COLLEGE RELATED COURSES: (These classes do NOT count toward the film studies certificate)
HACU-0258-1 (120045)  COLONIALISM AND THE VISUAL ARTS   Note(s) Prerequisites Required
Meeting Info 01/28/04 05/14/04 ASH 111 SEM W 09:00AM 11:50AM
Faculty S. Levine  Capacity 25
Designed as a seminar for Division II students in art history, cultural studies and/or studio arts, this course will explore aspects of the visual and cultural representations of colonialism and expansionism in the arts of western Europe and the United States. Topics will include: Napoleon's Egyptian Campaign of 1798- 1799; 19th-century travel literature; Japonisme and the introduction of a Japanese esthetic into western art; manifest destiny in the U. S. and the changing image of the Native American; propaganda imagery of colonialism; the gendering of expansionist imagery; primitivism in modern art; cinematic and popular culture representations of Africa and the Middle East. Throughout, our goal will be to trace the ways that, over the past two centuries, Western cultures have represented themselves in depicting their colonial others.To receive an evaluation, students must do the assigned readings, attend film screenings and special lectures, complete written assignments, and a class presentation. Background in art history is essential.