HAMPSHIRE COLLEGE

Fall 2010 HACU Film Related Courses

[Spring 2010 Courses Archived]

 

HACU 109  Intro to Media Production: Art and Agriculture
Kara Lynch, Nancy Hanson, Leslie Cox
T 12:30-3:20, Lib B3 and TH 12:30-3:20, Kiva
How can we create a sustainable environment in which to pursue artistic and agricultural development? As a class we will come up with a mission statement and plan of action to answer this question. This hands-on, project based course will look at relationships built between artists, activists, and agriculturalists to build a sustainable past, present, and future. We will collaborate with Hampshire’s own Farm Center as well as forge lasting relationships with local artists, farmers, community organizers, and environmentalists, and research national and international initiatives that meet and inspire our mission and action plan. This course will introduce students to a variety of visual art media and time-based art production. We will also participate in the fall harvest at the Farm Center. This course is ideal for students interested in art, agriculture, collaboration and community engagement and willing to put in a few hours of farm work each week. This class includes one scheduled lab period for screenings and workshops; as well as a 2hr a week floating lab/labor shift at the farm. Total contact hours for the class is 7 hours weekly. You must be interested in the outdoors and be willing to travel for classes and field trips off campus. This course can satisfy the prerequisite for photo I, video I or film I courses. EXP, MCP PRS, PRJ, REA, WRI
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category: 
Five College Film Studies Major category: 8

HACU 124T  Feminist Film and Performance
Baba Hillman
TTH 9-10:20            JLC 120
This course combines film/video practice and theory. Through readings, screenings and discussion we will question the visual and performative approaches of a range of filmmakers and performers. We will discuss the works of Yamina Benguigui, Ximena Cuevas, Martha Rosler, Fanta Regina Nacro, and Mona Hatoum among others, and will examine the diverse performative strategies these artists use to confront questions of feminism, gender, race, sexuality and transnationality. We will consider the ways in which these works cut across performative codes in moves that question the act and meaning of performance in relation to media; how they reflect the artists' drive to create visual and physical languages that embody the questions and ideas that inspire them. Students will complete two projects in film or video.  EXP, MCP, PRJ, PRS, REA
HC 1st Year Tutorial:   not open to 4 College students
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  none
Five College Film Studies Major category:  8

HACU 125T  Making Media for Democracy
Joan Braderman

MW 5-6:30 PM      JLC 131
Corporate consolidation and ties to the White House have intensified the usual myopia of the “mass” media in the US. But a range of new and independent news and culture jamming strategies are emerging rapid-fire to crack open the media landscape.  In addition to video and text websites, there are a skyrocketing number of streaming sites, experiments with low power radio, progressive entrepreneurs buying up satellite space, bandwidth space, independents crashing the gates of box offices and dreaming up ways to grow a huge underground of information and culture that the current regime does not want you to see. Though CNN, Fox, et al, are still where most Americans learn what they know, independent media-makers act on the belief that there can be no democracy without a wide range of sources of culture and news to educate and inspire real citizenship. In this workshop, we will look at historical and current strategies for democratizing the media and creating and effectively distributing sounds, images and words that are inaccessible in the dominant media. These range from the Situationists in Paris in the 60’s to indymedia.com and the Hip Hop Convention today.  As we examine experiments with media monopoly busting, students will work individually and in groups to plan, design and produce their own strategic media interventions – which will include video, TV, film, digital media, writing, photography, drawing, postering, installation, theater, music, radio and whatever else students invent. EXP, MCP, REA
HC 1st Year Tutorial: not open to 4College students
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  none
Five College Film Studies Major category:  8

HACU 207  Non-Fiction Film
Abraham Ravett
W9-11:50- Screening?            JLC 131
"Certain people start with a documentary and arrive at fiction...others start with fiction and arrive at the documentary."-Jean Luc Godard
The objective of this course is to introduce non-fiction film and video practice to students from a variety of disciplines.  Through a combination of screenings, lectures, readings and technical workshops, we will explore a critical/historical overview of this genre and incorporate our knowledge and experience into several cinematic profiles chosen by members of the class. There will be evening screenings. There is a  $50 lab fee for this course. This course satisfies the Division I Distribution requirement. EXP, PRJ, PRS, REA, WRI
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:   IIB, V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  4, 8

HACU 210  Film I
Abraham Ravett
F 9-11:50, JLC 120,  F 1-3:00 (screening)            JLC 120
This course teaches the basic skills of film production, including camera work, editing, sound recording, and preparation and completion of a finished work in film and video. Students will submit weekly written responses to theoretical and historical readings and to screenings of films and videotapes, which represent a variety of aesthetic approaches to the moving image. There will be a series of filmmaking assignments culminating in an individual final project for the class. The development of personal vision will be stressed. The bulk of the work in the class will be produced in 16mm format. Video formats plus digital image processing and non-linear editing will also be introduced. A $50 lab fee provides access to equipment and editing facilities. Students are responsible for providing their own film, tape, processing and supplies. There are weekly evening screenings or workshops. Prerequisite courses include a 100 level course in media arts (Introduction to Media Arts, Introduction to Media Production, Introduction to Digital Photography & New Media, or equivalent and must be completed and not concurrent with this course.) NOTE: Enrolled or top 5 waitlist students who DO NOT attend the first class session risk losing their place on the class roster.
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  8

HACU 237  Abandoned Hopes:  The Russian 20th Century in Literature and Film
Polina Barskova
W 2:30-5:20PM            FPH 106
This course will survey the dramatic history of Russia in the XXth century through the prism of its cultural achievement. How did aesthetic forms -- namely literature and film -- reflect on the age of war, revolution, and terror, characterized by absolute power and stalwart resistance? What means of cultural expression emerged in response to the bloody and often dehumanizing diction of the Soviet period?  The task of this course is both to assess the historical panorama of a decisive and difficult period and to zoom in on its especially characteristic works, including literature by Maiakovsky, Babel, Platonov, Nabokov, Kharms and Brodsky, and films by Eisenstein, Vertov, Dovzhenko, Tarkovsky, Shepit’ko, Paradzhanov.
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:   IIB, V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  6 (component)

HACU 264  Media Production II: Making Media for Democracy
Joan Braderman
T 12:30-3:20            JLC 120
Corporate consolidation and ties to the White House have intensified the usual myopia of the “mass” media in the US. But a range of new and independent news and culture jamming strategies are emerging rapid-fire to crack open the media landscape.  In addition to video and text websites, there are a skyrocketing number of streaming sites, experiments with low power radio, progressive entrepreneurs buying up satellite space, bandwidth space, independents crashing the gates of box offices and dreaming up ways to grow a huge underground of information and culture that the current regime does not want you to see. Though CNN, Fox, et al, are still where most Americans learn what they know, independent media-makers act on the belief that there can be no democracy without a wide range of sources of culture and news to educate and inspire real citizenship. In this workshop, we will look at historical and current strategies for democratizing the media and creating and effectively distributing sounds, images and words that are inaccessible in the dominant media. These range from the Situationists in Paris in the 60’s to indymedia.com and the Hip Hop Convention today.  As we examine experiments with media monopoly busting, students will work individually and in groups to plan, design and produce their own strategic media interventions – which will include video, TV, film, digital media, writing, photography, drawing, postering, installation, theater, music, radio and whatever else students invent. Substantive experience in at least two of these areas and completed coursework in at least one, are pre-requisites for this course. Instructor’s permission required.
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  8

HACU 277  Film Theory Seminar: Gender and Genre
Lise Sanders
TTH 2:30-3:20            FPH 105 Seminar
In her seminal 1991 essay "Film Bodies: Gender, Genre, Excess," Linda Williams observed that "The repetitive formulas and spectacles of film genres are often defined by their differences from the classical realist style of narrative cinema.” In this course, we will use the relationship between gender and genre as a lens through which to view these differences as we trace the evolution of film theory since the 1970s. Readings will draw on foundational texts in psychoanalysis, feminist and queer theory, postcolonial theory, and other trends in film criticism, accompanied by weekly screenings. This course is designed to meet the needs of students pursuing Division II concentrations in film studies and related fields, and will meet the film theory requirement for the Five College Major in Film Studies. Prerequisite: Introduction to Film Studies or an equivalent course.
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIA, V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  3

HACU 310  Advanced Topics in Time Based Media
Kara Lynch
W 1-5PM            JLC 120
This course is open to concentrators in their first or final semester of the Division III working with time-based media: film, video, sound, electronic + digital moving images, installation and performance. The course offers a forum for meaningful criticism, exchange, and exposure to each other in the process of conceiving, developing and completing a Division III project. Instructor’s permission required.
Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IV, V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  8