HAMPSHIRE COLLEGE 

Film & Video Course Guide  Fall 2008   (updated 4/4/08)

 

HACU 106  INTRO TO MEDIA ARTS:  ANALOG/DIGITAL MEDIA ARTS

T 12:30-3:20, Scr T 6:30-9          Lib B3 

Farkhondeh                                           Cap      16        

This production and theory course will introduce students to basic video, film and photographic techniques and to a diverse range of critical texts on digital and media theory, film theory and some art history. Production work will include the use of digital video and non-linear editing, Super 8 film cameras and analog editing and digital photography and Photoshop. Students will gain experience in pre-production and post- production techniques and will learn to think about and look critically at the moving and still image. Students will complete two digital photo projects and two time-based projects, including a Super 8 film and a digital video piece edited on a non-linear system. A $50 lab fee provides access to equipment and editing facilities. Students are responsible for providing their own film, tape, processing and supplies. EXP, PRJ, REA

Five College Film Studies Major Category:  8

 

HACU 108  HAND MADE FILMS

W 9-11:50 check time, Scr. W7-9           FPV classroom for both

William Brand                                                   Cap      16

While mainstream cinema developed as commercial entertainment, artists working on the margins created a parallel and often oppositional film history.  This course will explore experimental and avant-garde films made in the artisanal mode often in political response to commercial culture or in concert with developments in modern and post-modern art.  The course will focus on films that respond directly to the physical properties of the medium either by subverting the photographic process or by directly manipulating the materials through primitive animation or direct painting on film.  We will screen films from all periods of cinema history – from Winsor Mckay to Stan Brakhage - as well by artists working today. In each case we will attempt to understand films within a historical context with theoretical and historical texts.   From a detailed study of films, students will write descriptive and analytical essays.  Also, students will experience hand made filmmaking through group and individual projects with pin-hole cameras, painting and drawing on film, cel and object animation and hand-processing techniques. REA, WRI, EXP, PRJ, PRS

Five College Film Studies Major Category:  8

 

HACU 109 INTRO TO MEDIA PRODUCTION: Imaging Truth (Or Reality & Other Inventions)

T 6-9    PFB Classroom

Jean Marie Casbarian                Cap 16

How do we define truth in a world teeming with still and moving image?  If our histories (and memories) are defined by these images, is truth on its way to becoming an invention?  How true is truth?  This course will introduce students to interdisciplinary work in media production.  As thinkers, we will read, look at, and investigate the connections between meaning and image, truth and fiction, reality and invention.  As art makers, we will explore these intersections as we experiment with a variety of media including photography, video, text, and sound.  You will begin to interpret, translate and/or invent or re-invent your personal truth(s), while being asked to consider new ways in which to visually articulate these ideas.  Be prepared to read, think, experiment and expand the ways in which you think about art making.  This class will prepare students for continued work in media and media production.  There is a lab fee charged for this course. NOTE: Enrolled or top 5 waitlist students who DO NOT attend the first class session risk losing their place on the class roster.. REA, WRI, EXP, PRS.

Five College Film Studies Major Category:  8

 

HACU 121T  THE WALKING ARTS

MW 10:30-11:50            FPV classroom M and FPH 102 W

Robert Seydel               Cap 13

This course will introduce students to interdisciplinary work in media production. The focus of the class will be on a wide range of artistic and literary texts concentrated on the image, activity, and poetics of the walking artist, a figure of nomadic, restless, journeying intensity.  From the nineteenth century flaneur, summarized in authors such as Walter Benjamin and Charles Baudelaire, to the mid-twentieth century Situationists, the urban walking artist plays a central role in our understanding of space, solitude, and the dynamics of contemplation and the crowd.  Here travel and travail share a bodily and mental labor, and determine a journeying and wandering related to chance effects and the density of environment.  But as well, the image of the walking arts extends from previous centuries' mendicant friars, pilgrimages, and such primary poetic representations as the wandering poets of Japan, consolidated in the latter instance in Basho's haiku diary, "The Far Road to the Deep North."  Walking, writes Bruce Chatwin, whose book "The Songlines," will be a core text for the class, "is not simply therapeutic for oneself, but is a poetic activity that can cure the world of its ills."  Through readings, including texts, among others, by Anne Carson, Robert Walser, and Rebecca Solnit, film screenings, the examination of a variety of artists, including Hamish Fulton and Richard Long, and a series of student projects in photography, video, and writing, among other media, the class will test this proposition, and immerse itself in the walking arts as both a way of being in the world and a history of production that stretches into the deep past and informs an ongoing terrain of contemporary practice. This class will prepare students for continued work in media and media production.  There is a lab fee charged for the course.  EXP, PRS, REA, WRI.

 

HACU 209  VIDEO I

W 1-3:50           Lib B3

Kara Lynch                  Cap 16

This is an introductory video production course.  Over the course of the semester students will gain experience in pre-production, production and post-production techniques as well as learn to think and look critically about the making of the moving image.  Projects are designed to develop basic technical proficiency in the video medium as well as the necessary working skills and mental discipline so important to a successful working process.  Final production projects will experiment with established media genres.  Readings, screenings, In-class critiques and discussion will focus on media analysis and the role of technology in image production. 

There is a lab fee charged for the course. Prerequisite: 100 level course in media arts (Introduction to Media Arts, Introduction to Media Production, Introduction to Digital Photography & New Media, or equivalent). NOTE: Enrolled or top 5 waitlist students who DO NOT attend the first class session risk losing their place on the class roster.

Five College Film Studies Major Category:  8

 

HACU 210  FILM WORKSHOP I

T 12:30-3:20, Scr. M 7-9            PFB Classroom

William Brand               Cap 16

This course teaches the basic skills of film production, including camera work, editing, sound recording, and preparation and completion of a finished work in film and video. Students will submit weekly written responses to theoretical and historical readings and to screenings of films and videotapes, which represent a variety of aesthetic approaches to the moving image. There will be a series of filmmaking assignments culminating in an individual final project for the class. The development of personal vision will be stressed. The bulk of the work in the class will be produced in 16mm format. Video formats plus digital image processing and non-linear editing will also be introduced. A $50 lab fee provides access to equipment and editing facilities. Students are responsible for providing their own film, tape, processing and supplies. There are weekly evening screenings or workshops. Prerequisite courses include a 100 level course in media arts (Introduction to Media Arts, Introduction to Media Production, Introduction to Digital Photography & New Media, or equivalent and must be completed and not concurrent with this course.) This is an introductory video production course.  Over the course of the semester students will gain experience in pre-production, production and post-production techniques as well as learn to think and look critically about the making of the moving image.  Projects are designed to develop basic technical proficiency in the video medium as well as the necessary working skills and mental discipline so important to a successful working process.  Final production projects will experiment with established media genres.  Readings, screenings, In-class critiques and discussion will focus on media analysis and the role of technology in image production.  There is a lab fee charged for the course. Prerequisite: 100 level course in media arts (Introduction to Media Arts, Introduction to Media Production, Introduction to Digital Photography & New Media, or equivalent). NOTE: Enrolled or top 5 waitlist students who DO NOT attend the first class session risk losing their place on the class roster.

Five College Film Studies Major Category:  8

 

HACU 211 STILL PHOTOGRAPHY I:  DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY

T 9-11:50          Lib B3

Jacqueline Hayden                    Cap 16

This course explores the intersections of digital and traditional photographic imaging in terms of technique, critical theory, history and aesthetics.  Experimentation with photo-electronic imaging will be practiced and discussed within the context of contemporary art and digital culture. The theoretical backdrop will include issues of representation, mechanization, and authenticity.  Historical influences such as 20th century photomontage, documentary photography, layered narrative constructions with image and text, and scientific imaging practices, will be covered in readings and slide talks in order to provide context for assignments, and to further discussions in our regular in-class critiques of student work.  Project-oriented studio assignments will allow plenty of time to develop personal content while advancing Photoshop skills. Students will produce printed hard copy, as well as on-screen presentations of images in electronic books or Web projects.  Prerequisites: Introduction to Media Arts, Art History or Photographic History course or its equivalent in studio arts.  A lab fee will be charged for this course. NOTE: Enrolled or top 5 waitlist students who DO NOT attend the first class session risk losing their place on the class roster.

 

HACU 253  MEDIA PRODUCTION II:  THE NARRATIVE

F 9-11:50          Lib B3

Kara Lynch      Cap 16

This course is an intermediate level production class that concentrates on narrative media production. This course will interrogate this form and expand the definition while introducing students to techniques and strategies for getting their projects from pitch to final cut. Requirements for this class include: attendance, participation in discussions and in-class critiques, outside theoretical readings and film/video screenings, weekly journal entries, production assignments, in- class workshops and a written treatment, script and budget for their final projects. Students will work in crews to complete 2-4 final narrative projects. Through these projects, students will become familiar with three major stages of media production: pre- production (research and development of an idea, planning & scheduling), production (shooting, recording, execution) and post- production (editing and revision); they will also acquire cursory knowledge of distribution. Supplementary workshops will concentrate on skills necessary for work in digital, film/video and audio production, including: lighting, field + studio recording, and editing. The goal of the course is for students to produce narrative work from start to finish with a group and practice their skills as producers and directors, writers, thinkers and artists. There is a lab fee charged for the course. Prerequisites include: Intro to Media production or equivalent, Video/Film I or equivalent, one media studies/theory class, and one related course in the humanities, arts or social sciences. Instructor Permission required.

Five College Film Studies Major Category:  8

 

HACU 254 PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOP II: Large Format Photography & Alternative Photographic Printmaking

T 9-11:50AM    FPV classroom

Kane Stewart                Cap 16

This course will offer intermediate and advanced photography students an opportunity to expand their photographic skills by working with large format cameras and making prints using alternative materials such as: gum-printing, platinum/palladium, cyanotype, kallitype, and carbon printing.  These contact printing processes require negatives the same size as the desired print and students will learn to use large format cameras and produce digital negatives.  This course is designed for experienced photo students with well-honed darkroom and basic Macintosh skills.  Students interested in this course will have had Photo II and be moderately familiar with Photoshop.  Although there will be a great deal of technical application covered in this course, the objective here is to learn processes that will not only expand creative options but further develop your personal vision.  A $50 lab fee entitles student access to darkroom facilities, lab supplies, and chemicals.  Technical workshops will meet once a week for two hours. Instructor permission required.

 

HACU 255  FILM WORKSHOP II: Recycled Images

F 9-11:50 scr-F-1-2:20   PFB classroom

Abraham Ravett                        Cap 16

This course emphasizes developing skills in 16mm filmmaking. The course will cover the basics of 16mm pre-planning (scripting or storyboarding), cinematography, sound recording, editing and postproduction. We will also explore and at times emphasize,   the use of " recycled images" in the construction of found footage films and video tapes. Students will be expected to complete individual projects as well as participate in-group exercises. Reading and writing about critical issues is an important part of the course and students will be expected to complete several writing projects. Workshops in animation, optical printing, hand made films, non-linear editing, digital imaging and audio mixing will be offered throughout the semester. Students are expected to attend these workshops as well as attend screenings of seminal film and video works in documentary, narrative and experimental genres. A $50 lab fee entitles students to use camera and recording equipment, transfer and editing facilities, plus video and computer production and post-production equipment. Students must purchase their own 16mm or Super 8 film and pay their own processing fees. Required screenings and workshops often occur in the evening or on Friday afternoon. Film Workshop I will be considered a prerequisite. Instructor permission is required.

Five College Film Studies Major Category:  8

 

HACU/CS 282  NON-FICTION FILM

TH 9-11:50, scr. Th 7-9       PFB classroom

Abraham Ravett & Chris Perry              Cap 25?

"Certain people start with a documentary and arrive at fiction...others start with fiction and arrive at the documentary."-Jean Luc Godard

This is a seminar geared for film/video/animation concentrators who would like to explore or refine their interest in documentary practice. Utilizing a combination of screenings, technical workshops, and contemporary readings as a foundation for our discussions, the goal of the workshop will be to produce an individual or collaborative project. Projects need not be restricted to a particular medium; in fact, students will be encouraged to explore the ways in which film, video, and/or animation can be utilized together. Limited to Division II or Division III students. Prerequisite: completion of either Film/Video Workshop I, Video I, Photo Workshop I, or an introductory course in animation. Instructor's permission is required. Lab Fee.

Five College Film Studies Major Category:  8

 

HACU 287 A PRIVATE PERFORMANCE FOR THE CAMERA:  Directing the Self Through Still & Moving Image

M 1-3:50PM     FPV classroom

Jean Marie Casbarian                Cap 16

In 1839, Hippolyte Bayard posed as a corpse in his "Self-Portrait as a Drowned Man." His action created not only one of the first photographs intended for the purpose of propaganda but he more than likely staged the first performance for the camera. Throughout history, artists and image-makers have used the photograph (along with video, maps and text) to document their actions as a way to write (or re-write) their own histories. This course will examine the legacy of performance and the still/moving image as students are asked to perform for the camera. The class draws on diverse historic and contemporary sources including the self-portraits of Bayard, Claude Cahun, Sherman, and Erwin Wurm; the private-public performances of Yves Klein, Chris Burden, Ana Mendieta, Sophie Calle, and Tehching Hsieh; the video works and installations of Bruce Nauman, Patty Chang, and Miranda July and the collaborations of Abromovic/Ulay and Smith/Stewart. Though some process-based assignments will be given, the dynamics of the class will rely on your ability to produce work based on your own ideas. This is an Upper Level Div II course and will require periodic screening times outside of class. There is a lab fee charged for this course. Instructor Permission.

Five College Film Studies Major Category:  8

 

HACU 334  THE COLLECTOR:  THEORY AND PRACTICE

Th 6-9PM         PFB Classroom

Sura Levine and Robert Seydel              Cap 16

The collector has become a primary figure or type in the world of contemporary art, and much of the most advanced work of the modern and postmodern periods can be tied to a collecting mentality. The early Wunderkammern of the sixteenth century and Dutch oil painting of the century following forms the prelude to our own century of collection mania and mad taxonomies. From Marcel Duchamp’s Box in a Valise and Joseph Cornell’s voluminous files to Claus Oldenburg’s Mouse Museum and Daniel Spoerri’s An Anecdoted Topography of Chance, from Joseph Beuys’s and Christian Boltanski’s installations to Marcel Broodthaer’s Museum of Modern Art, artists have employed the mentality of the collector in a variety of ways and to a variety of ends. In our examination of these and other works by contemporary artists we will research the mentality of the collector and attempt to understand its resonance for the modernist and postmodernist periods.  The course is designed to emphasize photo-and-other-installation based work, but is simultaneously open to students from any concentration, including art history and writing. For students making use of the photography facilities, a $50 lab fee is charged for this course.

 

HACU 335 DIVISION III PROJECTS CLASS:  PHOTOGRAPHY & MIXED MEDIA: Sequence/Structure/Juxtaposition

Th 6-9PM         PFB Classroom

Jacqueline Hayden                    Cap 35

This class is intended to be about, to further, your own work, what it is, what you plan with and through it, what you want it to be, both as it relates to your beginning Division Three projects, as well as to your general orientations as image-makers and-thinkers.  It will be primarily up to you, therefore, to generate your visual production for the class - the work for it, that is to say, should extend from your own motivations and inspirations. A variety of exercises and assignments will, however, instigate and should develop structures for you with which to weave your work into larger statements, image-to-image and concept to concept.

The course is open to advanced students beginning their Division III concentration or to late Division II students, dependent in the latter case on demand. We will investigate various strategies employed in building larger chains of meaning across multiple images and through a body of work, and examine narrative, documentary, and poetic approaches to the work of expansive photographic (and other) construction. One of our intentions is to understand representational speech as multiple, expansive, and sequential.  Movement of image, the construction of knots and thematics across a body of photographs, speed, pacing, repetition, conceptual density and formal and intellectual rhyming from image to image will be a central focus of the class. Instructor permission required.