Events

Presenters:

Mark Feinberg, Ph.D., Research Professor, Prevention Research Center,  Department of Human Development and Family Studies, Pennsylvania State University

Mark Feinberg, Ph.D., conducts basic and applied research on youth, families, and communities, with a particular focus on family dynamics and family-focused prevention.  He has developed and tested several prevention programs, including Family Foundations (FF), a transition-to-parenthood program designed to enhance coparenting among first-time parents.  FF has been shown to reduce adverse birth outcomes, postpartum depression, couple and parent-child physical aggression, and child internalizing and externalizing problems. Dr. Feinberg has also co-developed prevention programs addressing sibling relationship conflict, adverse birth outcomes, and childhood obesity, and has been involved in the long-term evaluation of large-scale community prevention systems, including Communities That Care, PROSPER, and Evidence2Success.  He has also written about and examined the community epidemiology of adolescent problem behaviors, i.e., the ways in which risk factors are linked to behavior problems within and between communities

 

Event Date(s):
January 29, 2015 4:00 pm- 5:00 pm
| 4:00pm to 5:00pm
Location:
Campus Center, Room 163C, University of Massachusetts Amherst
Description:
Presenters:
  •  
  • - John Kennedy, Vice Chancellor for University Relations
  • - Katherine S. Newman, Provost and Senior Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs
  • - Amy Schalet, Director, Public Engagement Project; Associate Professor, Dept. of Sociology
  • - Linda R. Tropp, Professor, Dept. of Psychology; Director, Psychology of Peace and Violence Program

Opening remarks will be delivered by:

  • - John Hird, Interim Dean, College of Social & Behavioral Sciences
  • - Steven Goodwin, Dean, College of Natural Sciences
Event Date(s):
January 27, 2015 11:30 am- 1:00 pm
| 11:30am to 1:00pm
Location:
Campus Center, Room 804-08, University of Massachusetts Amherst
Description:

Scholars are increasingly interested in influencing policy and public debates. But how can they be most effective at engaging diverse audiences?