News Archive

CRF In The News - October

The Center for Research on Families and its scholars in the news for the month of October 2011.

 

A quote from CRF Scholar (’03-’04) and Professor of Sociology Naomi Gerstel  in the NYTimes Well Blog was cited in MSN Money article on how single people have it tough. According to Gerstel, unmarried Americans still face a lingering social stigma.  She states, "There is this push for marriage in the straight community and in the gay community, essentially assuming that if you don't get married there is something wrong with you." (MSN Money, New York Times, 10/31/11)

 

Nancy Folbre, Professor of Economics and former CRF Family Research Scholar ('07-'08), writes in the Economix blog about how American society is depreciating the value of care at home for elders and people who are sick or with disabilities at the same time the numbers of older Americans is rising. She also notes that programs designed to keep people in their homes under the care of family members are being defunded. (New York Times, 10/31/11)

 

Amy Schalet, Assistant Professor of Sociology, author of the book "Not Under My Roof: Parents, Teens and the Culture of Sex," discusses the different attitudes towards adolescent sexuality among Dutch and American parents. She says connectedness between parents and teens is key for thriving not just around sexuality and relationships, but around health, and school outcomes. Schalet says the way to overcome the differences in attitude between the U.S. and the Dutch is through comprehensive sex education. (Salon.com, 10/30/11)

 

Nancy Folbre, in a blog post on Economix titled “The Recession and Pink and Blue”, states that although men have lost more jobs, in absolute terms, women, especially mothers have had a harder time  have had a harder time in this recession.  Citing a recent report from the Institute for Women’s Policy Research, Folbre discusses how married mothers were more likely to cut back on household spending and have more trouble getting or paying for medical care. (New York Times, 10/24/11)

 

Amy Schalet, author of the forthcoming book “Not Under My Roof: Parents, Teens and the Culture of Sex,” discusses the different attitudes towards adolescent sexuality among Dutch and American parents. She saysconnectedness between parents and teens is key for thriving not just around sexuality and relationships, but around health, and school outcomes. Schalet says, “On this the data is unambiguous.” (Ontario Today [CBC radio], 10/26/11)

 

Nancy Folbre discusses  the Occupy Wall Street movement on the NYTimes Economix Blog.  In it she states that the top 1% has “consolidated and amplified its privileged position”, with lower tax rates on a higher percentage of the nations pretax income.  (New York Times, 10/17/11)

 

M.V. Lee Badgett, director of the Center for Public Policy and Administration and past CRF Family Resarch Scholar (’04-’05), comments about a new study that finds a significant amount of discrimination in hiring against openly gay men in some parts of the country.  According to Badgett the study, “rules out differences in the gay and heterosexual applicants’ skills and experience by design, so the fact that gay applicants are much less likely to be invited for an interview is hard to explain by anything other than discrimination.” (Bay Area Reporter, 10/13/11)

 

CRF Scholar ('08-'09) and Professor of Psychology, Rebecca Ready's new blog "Your Quality of Life: Well Being for the Long Haul" launches on PsychologyToday.com.  In the first article, titled “Children of Alzheimer’s Disease”, Ready discusses Memory Walk season and her research on biological children of a parent with Alzheimer’s. (Psychology Today, 10/11/11)

 

A columnist writes about Amy Schalet who has written a book about the differing attitudes about teen sex between American parents and their counterparts in Holland. She says the issue of whether teens can sleep together in their parents’ house illustrates the sharp divergence in views. Most American parents strictly forbid such actions and know little about the sexuality of their children, while in Holland, sex is more of a family discussion issue. (Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, 10/10/11)

 

Nina Siulc, Assistant Professor of Legal Studies and former CRF Scholar (’10-11), has been elected to the board of directors for the Consortium of Undergraduate Law and Justice Programs (CULJP).  The Consortium, which was formed in 2003, "is an organization for colleges and universities that have interdisciplinary programs geared toward undergraduate education about law and justice in the United States and Internationally."  Siulc will serve on the board for two years. (CULJP, 10/4/11)

 

Nancy Folbre writes in the Economix blog about how the debate over taxing wealthy individuals, called “class warfare” by conservatives and Republicans, is the latest version of an ongoing economic discussion about conflict between groups in society. She says the debate highlights the fact that many Americans don’t know what economic class they belong to, but they are increasingly interested in finding out. (New York Times, 10/3/11)

 

M.V. Lee Badgett comments in a story about how even with the end of the “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” policy, same-sex couples are not treated equally because of the federal Defense of Marriage law. She says that law says states don’t have to recognize marriages from other states that allow for same-sex marriage and that the federal government also won’t recognize them. Badgett says that law has to be rescinded by Congress or struck down by the courts before the situation changes. (Marketplace [NPR], 9/30/11)