CRF In The News - December

CRF In The News - December

The Center for Research on Families and its scholars in the news for the month of December 2011.

 

Past CRF Scholar (’07-’08) Nancy Folbre, writes in the Economix blog about the idea of “philanthrocapitalism,” where businesses focus less on short-term profits and more on long-term issues related to taking care of people. She notes that the emphasis on short-term gain among corporations and capitalists may be why the public is much more supportive of ideas such as free enterprise but when asked in a poll, one-third of the public has a negative view of capitalism. (New York Times, 12/26/11)

 

Public Engagement Project (PEP) Co-founder Amy Schalet, author of the book “Not Under My Roof: Parents, Teens and the Culture of Sex,” is interviewed. She has researched and written about the attitudes toward adolescent sexuality and the differences in attitude about teen sex among Dutch and American parents. Schalet says the way to overcome the differences in attitude between the U.S. and the Dutch is through comprehensive sex education. (CNN, 12/26/11)

 

Former CRF Family Research Scholar (’04-’05) M.V. Lee Badgett says policymakers around the country are increasingly relying on social science researchas they debate changing laws related to same-sex marriage and other issues that affect gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people. (Out in Jersey, 12/26/11)

 

Amy Schalet, sociology, author of the book “Not Under My Roof: Parents, Teens and the Culture of Sex,” is interviewed. She has researched and written about the attitudes toward adolescent sexuality and the differences in attitude about teen sex among Dutch and American parents. Schalet says the way to overcome the differences in attitude between the U.S. and the Dutch is through comprehensive sex education. She will be on a live chat on Boston.com this afternoon. (Boston.com, Globe, 12/22/11)

 

Nancy Folbre, economics, writes in the Economix blog about how feminism has helped upper income, educated women to be more successful and attain higher levels of equality than in the past, but at the same time has failed to deliver the same benefits to lower-income women. Overall, she says, the feminist movement seems to be losing momentum. (New York Times, 12/19/11)

 

Past CRF Family Research Scholar (’08-’09) Rebecca Ready, psychology, discusses how positive moods help us recover from the stress of the holiday season.According to Ready, positive emotions have do not always drop with stress, as do negative emotions. Positive emotions therefore may be an aid to recovery from stressful situations.(Psychology Today, 12/13/11)

 

A national group of economists called Econ4, including Nancy Folbre, James Boyce and Gerald Epstein, economics, are pushing for the field to articulate a broader range of views following the economic meltdown in 2008 and the recession that followed. The group argues that “free market fundamentalism” has taken over the field of study and has evolved into dogma. They also argue that this dogma is responsible, in part, for the economic downturn that has hit the U.S. (Chronicle of Higher Education, 12/13/11)

 

Nancy Folbre examines the impact of federal welfare reform adopted 15 years ago in the Economix blog and notes that restrictions on aid have a greater effect on poor families with children during the current recession,when fewer jobs are available. (New York Times, 12/12/11)

 

A new report by M.V. Lee Badgett, economics and director of the Center for Public Policy and Administration, estimates Iowa got a $12 Million boost to economy from same sex marriage equality. According to the report, this money was generated by the 866 in-state same-sex couples chose to marry in the year following the April 2009 decision to allow same-sex couples the opportunity to wed and an additional 1,233 out-of-state same-sex couples traveled to Iowa to receive a marriage license. (The Williams Institute, 12/7/11)

 

Nancy Folbre, economics, writes in the Economix blog about how the British government is dealing with its debt problems by imposing strong austerity measures. She says the cutbacks have stalled the economy and are sparking protests from middle-class and working people there. (New York Times, 12/5/11)