Lecture: "A Thirst for Independence": How Richmond's Black Community Shaped Its Emancipation"

April 9, 2013
11:00 pm-12:30 pm

Shirley Graham Reading Room, 2nd Floor, New Africa House
180 Infirmary Way
United States
Free admission
Contact:
Tricia Loveland
413-545-2751

"A Thirst for Independence": How Richmond's Black Community Shaped Its Emancipation" a Lecture by Peter Rachleff

Although Richmond symbolized unfreedom in the antebellum South -- first, as the northern terminus of the domestic slave trade; later, during the Civil War, as the capital of the Confederacy -- its African American residents prepared themselves to play a leading role in the struggle for Emancipation.  They constructed extended families, networked organizations, built institutions, educated children, passed on skills, developed leaders, and prepared themselves to shape their own community.  In celebration of the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation, and in response to such movies as "Lincoln" and "Django Unchained," labor historian Peter Rachleff will discuss the ways that Richmond African Americans, both the formerly slave and the formerly free, launched themselves into the new chapter of American history called "Reconstruction."