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University of Massachusetts Amherst

University of Massachusetts Amherst

English Department

Undergraduate Studies

English Courses




Fall 2014 List of Courses


Fall 2014 Courses by NEW Requirements

Fall 2014 Mount Holyoke English Courses

Fall 2014 Courses by OLD Requirements

Fall 2014 Smith College English Courses

Fall 2014 English Courses by STEP Requirements

Fall 2014 Course Descriptions (PDF)

Fall 2014 Amherst College English Courses

Spring 2014 Course Descriptions (PDF)

Fall 2014 Hampshire College English Courses

 

 


English 115 American Experience (ALU)
Lecture 1 MWF 9:00-9:55 Instructor: David Katz
In this course, we will be reading a variety of literary forms written by authors from different backgrounds and different eras of American history, paying close attention to how these texts construct and relate to ?Americanness,? individualism, and democracy. More specifically, this course asks how the diversity of the perspectives presented here challenge, complicate, or affirm these concepts. Throughout the semester, we will consider how poetry, essays, and other texts confront the world around them while creating new ways of thinking through complex subjects?such as identity, class, gender, race, place, and more. Essentially, in this course we investigate how different experiences have been (or can be) dealt with imaginatively and creatively. Diversity has always contributed to a range of ideas about what exactly life is in the United States. In order to think most effectively about U.S. culture and art, then, we will read and discuss work by writers who come from a variety of backgrounds, voicing a variety of concerns and a variety of different ideas about what it means to be American. (Gen.Ed. AL, U)

English 115 American Experience (ALU)

Lecture 2 MWF 10:10-11:00 Instructor: Kate Marantz
Primarily for nonmajors. Introduction to the interdisciplinary study of American culture, with a wide historical scope and attention to diverse cultural experiences in the U.S. We will focus primarily on novels, but readings may include prose, drama, and poetry, as well, supplemented by other cultural artifacts including film and other visual arts. (Gen.Ed. AL, U).

English 115H American Experience Honors (ALU)
Lecture 2 TuTh 11:30-12:45 Instructor: Mason Lowance
Commonwealth College students only. This is a 4-credit Honors course. The course will examine the literature of the antebellum slavery debates in nineteenth-century America in A House Divided: The Antebellum Slavery Debates in America, 1776-1865 (Princeton, 2003) and through the voices of the slave narrators Olaudah Equiano, Frederick Douglass, and Harriet Jacobs. Biblical proslavery and antislavery arguments, economic discourse, the conflict of writers and essayists like Emerson and Thoreau, Whitman and Lowell, James Kirke Paulding, Harriet Beecher Stowe and Mary Eastman combine with scientific arguments and Acts of Congress relating to slavery to provide the historical background for examinations of the issues surrounding slavery. The seminar will also examine the abolitionist writings of William Lloyd Garrison, Lydia Maria Child, and the New York Abolitionists Arthur and Lewis Tappan and Gerrit Smith. Four literary works will be studied in detail: Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin, Twain's Huckleberry Finn and Pudd'nhead Wilson, and Morrison's Beloved, all of which represent approaches to the legacy of slavery. We will consider minstrel stereotyping, the sentimental novel as a vehicle for abolitionist arguments, and the rhetorical strategies of each of these texts.

English 117 Ethnic American Literature (ALU) (new requirements: global Anglophone/ethnic American literature or elective)
Lecture 1 MWF 1:25-2:15 Instructor: Carly Houston
American literature written by and about ethnic minorities, from the earliest immigrants through the cultural representations in modern American writing. (Gen.Ed. AL, U)

English 131 Society and Literature (ALG)
Lecture 1 MW 4:00-4:50 + discussion Instructor: Jen Adams
In our highly digital age, why do we still read? Does “literature” still exist? Or is that concept itself a by-product of an earlier time? In this course we will consider the various roles literature has played through the ages. Specifically, we will look at literature in English and the ways people have used it to express emotions like hope, love, desire, and fury; to empower themselves and find a collective identity; and to further (or resist) economic and military interests. We will start with the earliest English literature, the Old English and Middle English poetry that helped usher England and Englishness into being. (Main Authors: Geoffrey Chaucer, Marie de France, William Shakespeare.) We will then follow English across the Atlantic to the North American colonies, where authors used literature to sort out their own emerging identities as Americans. (Main Authors: Christopher Columbus, Olaudah Equiano, Edgar Allen Poe, Herman Melville.) Finally, we will look at the global sweep of English, and the ways colonial and postcolonial writers use literature to produce narratives that counter colonizing cultures, genres, and identities. (Main Authors: Chinua Achebe, Nadine Gordimer, Derek Walcott, Jamaica Kincaid, Jean Rhys.) Weekly response papers, 2 essays, 1 midterm, and 1 final exam. (Gen.Ed. AL, G)

132 Disc 1 Fr 9:05-9:55 TA: Faune Albert

132 Disc 6 Fr 1:25-2:15 TA: Sean Gordon

132 Disc 2 Fr 1:25-2:15 TA: Joy Jansen

132 Disc 7 Fr 9:05-9:55 TA: Sean Gordon

132 Disc 3 Fr 9:05-9:55 TA: William Steffen

132 Disc 8 Fr 11:15-12:05 TA: Rebecca Maillet

32 Disc 4 Fr 11:15-12:05 Anna-Claire Simpson

132 Disc 9 Fr 1:25-2:15 TA: Rebecca Maillet

132 Disc 5 Fr 1:25-2:15 William Steffen

132 Disc 10 Fr 11:15-12:05 TA: Joy Jansen

132 Disc 11 Fr 1:25-2:15 TA: Anne-Claire Simpson

English 132 Gender, Sexuality, Literature & Culture (ALG)
Lecture 1 MWF 11:15-12:05 Instructor: Gina Ocasion
This course will examine legal documents and short stories to explore the ways in which gender and sexuality are institutionalized and subverted within literature and culture. Our movement through materials will be guided by international legislation such as The Dawes Act, the Declaration of the Rights of the Child, and the North American Free Trade Agreement. Our area of inquiry will follow the migration of bodies and trade routes, tracing the trail of empire and resistance, recognizing the diverse social and cultural lived experiences, while also bearing witness to the ways in which these pluralities do not exist in isolation, but rather in constant and persistent contact. In taking up "culture", our work will be to make visible the paradoxes, conflicts, and contradictions rendered invisible by their quotidian presence and performance.

Assignments will include short reading responses and a semester long digital media/new media research project that will encourage students to connect conversations we have in class with other dynamic discourses occurring in real time on the Internet. (Gen.Ed. AL, G)

English 132 Gender, Sexuality, Literature & Culture (ALG)
Lecture 2 MWF 12:20-1:10 Instructor: Ashley Nadeau
Literature treating the relationship between man and woman. Topics may include: the nature of love, the image of the hero and heroine, and definitions, past and present, of the masculine and feminine. (Gen.Ed. AL, G)

English 140 Reading Fiction (AL)
Lecture 1 MWF 1:25-2:15 Instructor: Michael Schoch
An introduction to themes and techniques of fiction through a reading of selected short stories and novels with emphasis on structure, style, point of view, and theme. (Gen.Ed. AL)

English 142 Reading Drama (AL)
Lecture 1 MWF 9:05-9:55 Instructor: Josephine Hardman
In this course, we will focus on strategies for reading and analyzing drama. We will ask questions (and attempt to find answers) about issues such as dramatic language, structure, style, and character. In addition to developing close reading skills for this particular genre, we will imagine potential stagings of our selected plays. Special emphasis on the tragic, the weird, the absurd, and the darkly comic in drama from Euripides to Shakespeare to Beckett.

English 144 World Literature in English (ALG) (new requirements: global Anglophone/ethnic American literature or elective)
Lecture 1 TuTh 11:30-12:45 Instructor: Neelofer Qadir
This is a RAP class. World Literature in English: Roots and Routes is a course that focuses on contemporary literary and cultural texts with a particular interest in citizenship, (un)belonging, migrancy, labor, and globalization. Questions this course seeks to debate include: What are the legal, cultural, and economic bonds of citizenship and (un)belonging? What is the impact of these relationships on how we identify as a citizen of a nation? How do they influence the ways we are able to move around the world? How do they complicate the ways we perceive ourselves in relation to economic systems such as globalization? How do gender, ethnic, and sexual identities complicate these relationship of citizenship, belonging, nationhood, migrancy, and labor?

At the same time as our literary and cultural texts guide these discussions, we will ask what makes these texts ‘world’ literature, what that conceptual framework allows, and what it prohibits. We will explore how Anglophone world literature privileges certain kinds of narratives and modes of expression as well as how artists from across the world bring their creativity to bear on the English language.

This course meets the General Education AL and G requirements for literature and global diversity.

Note: This course is only open to students in the English RAP.

English 200 Intensive Literary Studies (old and new requirements: English 200 is a required course)
Lecture 1 TuTh 10:00-11:15 Instructor: Caroline Young
Introduction to literary study, concentrating on close reading and analysis of texts, writing and revising critical essays, and discussion of the issues that underlie the study of literature. English majors only. Prerequisite: Gen. Ed. College Writing.

English 200 Intensive Literary Studies (old and new requirements: English 200 is a required course)
Lecture 2 MW 4:00-5:15 Instructor: Ernest Gallo
No course description at this time. English majors only. Prerequisite: Gen. Ed. College Writing.

English 200 Intensive Literary Studies (old and new requirements: English 200 is a required course)
Lecture 3 TuTh 4:00-5:15 Instructor: Kirby Farrell
We live in narratives, from cultural histories to personal life stories. In practice we understand and navigate through the world using enabling fictions, accounts that help us make sense of life. We’ll be taking a ground-up approach to literary study, examining what goes on in texts by bringing together perspectives from psychology, anthropology, and history. Instead of starting with pre-defined literary categories and applying them to texts, we’ll be looking first at texts as behavior and analyzing their structures and the kinds of work they do, working toward literary concepts and terms. Readings range from Shakespeare to recent writers. Requirements: a series of short problem-solving papers, one every week or two. English majors only. Prerequisite: Gen. Ed. College Writing.

English 200 Intensive Literary Studies (old and new requirements: English 200 is a required course)
Lecture 4 TuTh 1:00-2:15 Instructor: Janis Greve
We will become familiar with key literary conventions and literary terms as we practice the fundamental techniques of annotation and close reading. Selections will include fiction, poetry, drama, and memoir. We will write a lot, in class and out of it, producing regular reader-responses and four short essays. Class will be in part a "writing workshop," in which we engage with one another's writing closely to both encourage and offer substantive constructive criticism. English majors only. Prerequisite: Gen. Ed. College Writing.

English 200 Intensive Literary Studies (old and new requirements: English 200 is a required course)
Lecture 7 TuTh 8:30-9:45 Instructor: Caroline Yang
No course description at this time. English majors only. Prerequisite: Gen. Ed. College Writing.

English 201 Early British Literature & Culture (old requirements: British literature pre-1700) (new requirements: English 201 or 221 requirement)
Lecture 1 TuTh 11:30-12:45 Instructor: Stephen Harris
Introduction to the literature and the literary imagination of the Middle Ages and Early Modern England. We will begin with a discussion of the nature of literary artifice before moving to a review of English historical and cultural contexts. We will discuss literary genre and form, style and convention, and the semantic and cultural force of fiction. Readings include Old English lyrics, Beowulf, Chaucer, Milton, Sidney, Spenser, Donne, Shakespeare, Herbert, and Marvell. Brief papers, quizzes, and a final project. Recommended for Sophomores and Juniors. English majors only. Prerequisite: Gen. Ed. College Writing.

English 201 Early British Literature & Culture (old requirements: British literature pre-1700) (new requirements: English 201 or 221)
Lecture 2 TuTh 2:30-3:45 Instructor: Adam Zucker
An introduction to English literature written between the Anglo-Saxon period and the middle of the 17th century. We will chart out our own literary history by examining the shared elements and innovations of a wide range of texts and authors. Beowulf, the Canterbury Tales, Elizabethan love sonnets, Milton's great Paradise Lost, and the drama of Shakespeare and his predecessors will be a few of our touchstones. Special emphasis on the social and historical resonance of different forms: epic, lyric, drama, and others. Two papers, occasional informal written responses, and a midterm exam. English majors only. Prerequisite: Gen. Ed. College Writing.


English 202 Later British Literature & Culture (old requirements: British literature 1700-1900) (new requirements: English 202, 268, 268 requirements)
Lecture 1 MW 2:30-3:45 Instructor: Tanya Fernando
The readings for this British Literature survey course span a few centuries, from the end of the eighteenth century to the early twentieth century. Our aim is to map the major questions of the periods: the Romantic Period; the Victorian Era and the Industrial Revolution; Modernism. Through the readings we will explore the questions that animated these writers: for example, questions of equality and freedom, the relevance of art and its impact on life, and the importance of aesthetic form. The assigned readings include various forms—novels, short stories, poetry, drama, as well as essays from history, art history, economics, and philosophy. For the most part, we will be using the Norton Anthology of British Literature. English majors only. Prerequisite: Gen. Ed. College Writing.


English 202 Later British Literature & Culture (old requirements: British literature 1700-1900)(new requirements: English 202, 268, 268 requirements)
Lecture 2 MW 4:00-5:15 Instructor: Heidi Holder
English majors only. This course provides a survey of British literature from the early eighteenth century and the Enlightenment through the First World War. We will focus on the rise of the novel, developments in the theory of poetry, and innovations in theatrical form; we will pay particular attention to changes in the nature of the audience for these genres. Readings will include works by Daniel Defoe, Jonathan Swift, Richard Brinsley Sheridan, William Blake, Joanna Baillie, Mary Shelley, Charles Dickens, Dion Boucicault, Robert Browning, Oscar Wilde, Virginia Woolf, and James Joyce. Additional contextual readings examine political, economic, scientific, technological, and social changes. Open only to English majors and those studying at the University on international or domestic exchange. English majors only. Prerequisite: Gen. Ed. College Writing.

 
English 202 Later British Literature & Culture (old requirements: British literature 1700-1900)(new requirements: English 202, 268, 268 requirements)
Lecture 3 MW 2:30-3:45 Instructor: Heidi Holder
See course description above. English majors only. Prerequisite: Gen. Ed. College Writing.

English 205 Introduction to Post-Colonial Studies (new requirements: Anglophone or 200+ elective)
Lecture 1 TuTh 11:30-12:45 Instructor: Mazen Naous
More than three-quarters of the people living in the world today have had their lives altered by the experience of colonization. How then do we negotiate postcolonialism as a term, a body of literature and theory from diverse geopolitical areas, and a dynamic, expansive, and contested field of study? To consider this question we will take up major issues and debates within postcolonial studies, including nationalism and nativism, subalternity, feminism, development, and globalization. Throughout, we will be concerned with questions of identity formation, representation, and literary form. This course surveys literatures written in English from South Asia, Africa and the Caribbean, and will probably include novels by J. M. Coetzee, Chinua Achebe, Arundhati Roy, Tayeb Salih, and Michelle Cliff. We will also watch a couple of movies that deal with postcolonial themes. Critical essays and postcolonial theory will guide our readings and film viewings.

English 203H Honors Bible, Myth Literature and Society (old and new requirements: elective)
Lecture 1 TuTh 10:00-11:15 Instructor: James Freeman
English majors only. The literary influence of the Bible, the most important genres; creation myths, hero tales, erotic poetry, prophecy, short stories, devotional verse, gospels. Avoids the interpretations of the later religions. Various themes from folklore, archeology, and history; what the literature meant to its originators. How certain biblical topics have interested secular artists.

English 221 Shakespeare AL (old requirements: Shakespeare or elective) (new requirements: English 201 or 221 requirement)
Lecture 1 MW 1:25-2:15 + discussion Instructor: Arthur Kinney
The power of Shakespeare’s plays derives in large part from the cultural concerns of his day, many of which are similar to our own. Accordingly, this class will emphasize close reading as a method to explore the ways that Shakespeare’s plays represented and interacted with the cultural environment in which they were created. We’ll ask how Shakespeare’s plays approach social class, gender, politics, religion, war, and global identity and how these issues inform modern notions of the self. The goal of the course will be to familiarize students with Shakespeare’s language, techniques, and context to understand better the range of his imagination and influence. The course requirements include weekly quizzes and short responses, two short papers, a midterm, and a final exam. Discussion section required. (Gen.Ed. AL)

221 Disc 1 F 10:10-11:00 am TA: Lauren Rollins

221 Disc 4 F 2:30-3:20 pm TA: Thomas Hopper

221 Disc 2 F 11:15-12:05 pm TA: Elizabeth Fox

221 Disc 5 F 10:10-11:00 am TA: Elizabeth Fox

221 Disc 3 F 1:25-2:15 pm TA: Thomas Hopper

221 Disc 6 F 11:15-12:05 TA: Lauren Rollins


English 254 Writing & Reading Imaginative Literature AL (new requirements: elective)
Lecture 1 MWF 10:10-11:00 Instructor: Patrick Gaughan
As writers, we try to be one of those on whom nothing is lost? (Henry James). How do we transform personal experiences, overheard chatter, anecdotes, interpretations, misinterpretations, dreams, and memories into art, into stories and poems? We’ll approach writing as a set of choices: about what stays and what goes, the right word, right detail, the right glitch in the pattern. You will write stories and poems (6 total) and write about stories and poems (5 total) and leave the class as informed writers, readers, and conversationalists. (Gen.Ed. AL)

English 254 Writing & Reading Imaginative Literature AL (new requirements: elective)

Lecture 2 MWF 11:15-12:05 Instructor: Andrew MacDonald
This course’s goal is to help foster a creative and critically minded community of writers within the class. By reading new and old writers alike and writing ourselves, we’ll examine techniques in writing that challenge, support, and evade creative expectations with a focus on enriching your own creative work. (Gen.Ed. AL)

English 254 Writing & Reading Imaginative Literature AL (new requirements: elective)

Lecture 3 MWF 12:20-1:10 Instructor: Alexander Scalfano
Analysis of problems of form, elements of genre, style and development of themes of stories and poems, written by class members and in class texts. Lecture, discussion, 5 poems, 2 stories, 2 essays. (Gen.Ed. AL)

English 254H Honors Writing & Reading Imaginative Literature (new requirements: elective)

Lecture 1 TuTh 2:30-3:45 Instructor: Daniel Grammer
This course fulfills University of Massachusetts Amherst's General Education requirement for Writing. It includes reading and discussion designed to help you develop excellent communication skills, exceptional analytic skills, and the ability to understand and think critically about complex issues. It fulfills AL (Literature) objectives for Content, Critical Thinking, and Communication. Our workshop will present the fundamental questions, ideas, and methods of analysis of the craft of Imaginative Writing. We will explore, interpret, and evaluate the written imagination. Regular practice in writing encourages clear thinking and clear expression. Demands weekly progress towards a 15-30 page creative portfolio. Open to Common College students only. (Gen.Ed. AL)

English 268 American literature and Culture Before 1865 (old requirements: American Identities or 2nd American)(new requirements: English 202, 268 and/or 269 requirements)
Lecture 1 TuTh 2:30-3:45 Instructor: Mason Lowance
Open to majors only. Prerequisite: Gen. Ed. College Writing. It fulfills the requirement for the English major for one American Literature course. Course requirements include: short analytical essay, approximately 5 pages; longer term paper, approximately 12 pages; take-home final examination. The format of the course will be a seminar in American literature from 1820-1865. The content will be organized chronologically but will also be examined thematically. In addition to the "canonized" authors of this period (Hawthorne and Melville, Emerson and Thoreau, Whitman and Dickinson), we will also consider some of the writers who exerted tremendous social and political impact on antebellum American culture, including the slave narrators Frederick Douglass and Harriet Jacobs, the feminist critics Margaret Fuller and Angelica Grimke Weld, the reformers and abolitionists William Lloyd Garrison and Wendell Phillips, and the most widely read author of the entire period, Harriet Beecher Stowe, whose Uncle Tom’s Cabin galvanized sentiment against slavery through sales of 5 million copies in a reading population of 15 million by 1860. Aesthetic, literary, biographical, cultural, social, and political approaches to these authors will all be considered. Open to English majors only. Pre-requisite: Completion of College Writing.

English 268 American literature and Culture Before 1865 (old requirements: American Identities or 2nd American)(new requirements: English 202, 268 and/or 269 requirements)

Lecture 2 TuTh 10:00-11:15 Instructor: Melba Jensen
In this course we will read narratives of individual and collective cultural transformations from the colonial and early republican periods in American literature. We will trace throughout these narratives various figurations of "American" subjectivity, such as the captive and the redeemed; the slave, the servant, and the freeman; the alien and the citizen; the foreign and the native. Through such textual figures, we will explore as well the cultural production of a broader narrative of the "imagined community" of the nation. While reading a selective survey of literary works, travel narrative, and poetry from the 1670s through the antebellum era, we will address as well critical and theoretical reconsiderations of the literature and culture of the early republic. Open to English majors only. Pre-requisite: Completion of College Writing.

English 269 American literature and Culture After 1865 (old requirements: American Identities or 2nd American)(new requirements: English 202, 268 and/or 269 requirements)
Lecture 1 TuTh 10:00-11:15 Instructor: Eric Fortier
No course description at this time. Open to English majors only. Pre-requisite: Completion of College Writing.

English 269 American literature and Culture After 1865 (old requirements: American Identities or 2nd American)(new requirements: English 202, 268 and/or 269 requirements)
Lecture 2 MW 2:30-3:45 Instructor: Hoang Phan
Beginning in the Age of Emancipation and ending in the Age of Empire, this course will focus on the relationship between American literature and the broader social transformations of this period.What are the differing narratives posed by literary works of these periods, on the issues of Reconstruction and citizenship; nationalism and imperial expansion; industrialization and consumer culture; social order and revolution?Studying the formal and thematic innovations of a range of American writers, the course will explore the various ways these writers responded to the radical upheavals of their times. The course will focus in particular on American literary realism, naturalism, and modernism.Reading widely and deeply, we’ll study Chopin, Crane, Dreiser, Du Bois, James, Norris, and Twain, among others. Throughout our readings we’llexamine the ways in which the literature of this period contributed to the imagined community of the nation; and how it continues to mediate our own modern understanding of the nation, and its history. Open to English majors only. Pre-requisite: Completion of College Writing.

English 269H American literature and Culture After 1865 Honors (old requirements: American Identities or 2nd American)(new requirements: English 202, 268 and/or 269 requirements)

Lecture 1 TuTh 1:00-2:15 Instructor: Eric Fortier
This course fulfills an American literature requirement for the English major. Open to English majors only. Pre-requisite: Completion of College Writing.

English 298B Literary Classics on Film
Lecture 1 Tu 6:30-9:00 pm Instructor: Kirby Farrell
The Great Victorian Novels on Film. This is a 1 credit film series presenting adaptations of classic Victorian novels, and especially useful for English majors. Works by Jane Austen, Dickens, George Eliot, Hardy, and others. Mandatory Pass/Fail course. One screening each week. 1 credit. Requirements: attendance.

English 300 Junior Year Writing (old and new requirements: junior year writing requirement)

Lecture 1 TuTh 10:00-11:15 Instructor: Laura Doyle
Topic: Woolf, Anand and Morrison. Differently positioned, yet with shared concerns, Virginia Woolf, Mulk Raj Anand, and Toni Morrison crafted startling visions of human connection even as they offered sharp critiques of empire, war, slavery, and intersectional politics. Woolf and Anand worked together at Hogarth Press and carried on intertextualliterary dialogues under conditions shaped by empire and the Bloomsbury group; a generation later, Toni Morrison closely studied Woolf’s work for her MA thesis and her novels implicitly speak back to it. All of them re-narrated bodily, intersubjective experience as it is entangled with social and historical conditions. Together, they give us rich grounds for studyingliterary relations among authors in the context of politics, and for exploring the philosophical questions that underlie literary forms. In addition to the fiction, the course will include regular background readings in criticism, culture and history. Active thinking and participation in discussion is expected. This writing intensive course will include drafts and revisions as well as several shorter writing assignments. English junior and senior majors only. Prerequisite: English 200 and one of the following two period survey distributions: 201, 202, 221, 268 or 269.

English 300 Junior Year Writing (old and new requirements: junior year requirement)

Lecture 2 MW 4:00-5:15 Instructor: Tanya Fernando
Topic: To Read A City: London in the 20th Century. This class focuses on the trope of the city in literature, specifically London as a modernist city. It traces the way London appears in the twentieth century, primarily in literature but also in other art forms. We will examine how and why the image of the city changes or remains the same. We begin with earlier accounts of London, including texts by Blake and Conan Doyle. We spend most of the term traversing the twentieth century and then end with a description of London in our new millennium. Some questions we will ask: Why is there an interest in the city? How does it become a symbol of modernism itself? Who is able to navigate the city: who is the modern subject? The class will analyze literary, theoretical, and visual texts by writers and artists such as Virginia Woolf, T.S. Eliot, Roger Fry, Caryl Phillips, Hanif Khureshi, Walter Benjamin, and Raymond Williams. Since this is a Junior-Year Writing Seminar we will spend a considerable amount of time on the writing process: working on argument, drafting, revision, and peer-editing. Satisfies Junior-Year Writing Requirement.English junior and senior majors only. Prerequisite: English 200 and one of the following two period survey distributions: 201, 202, 221, 268 or 269.

English 300 Junior Year Writing (old and new requirements: junior year requirement)
Lecture 3 MW 2:30-3:45 Instructor: Randall Knoper
Topic: Darwinism & American literature. Darwinism and American Literature The course will be an investigation, first, of American literature in the wake of Charles Darwin’s On the Origin of Species and The Descent of Man, with a focus on later nineteenth- and early twentieth-century fiction. Darwin’s impact on every dimension of U. S. culture was of course tremendous. His work profoundly challenged a religious culture and its ideas of humanity, progress, and the meaning of life. And his ideas were quickly enlisted to support a host of (often contradictory) social and political ideologies. How did American authors grapple with Darwinism? How did they represent or imaginatively transform ideas of evolution and heredity? How did they treat ideas about the continuities between human beings and animals--in their consciousness, mental faculties, emotions, and “social instincts”? How was their writing affected by evolutionary ideas about the progress of civilization, or about the “nature” (and, often, the presumably retarded development) of women, nonwhite races, “savages,” and criminals? Those are some of the questions this course will engage. Second, as an Advanced Seminar for Junior Year Writing, the course will consider the reasons for and ways of asking such questions. What is the relation of literature to intellectual history? What are the current practices of interdisciplinary study and “cultural studies” that may shape the way we investigate relations between literature and its contexts? What might be the reasons for looking at such issues in literature? That is, can literature give us some special purchase on these questions, something that the discourse of science does not? And what might be the benefits of this kind of historical study? Amidst the current resurgence of Darwinist thinking--sociobiology, arguments about race and intelligence, explanations of our mating practices in terms of “reproductive success”--is reading century-old literature enlightening? We will be reading Darwin, of course, and some of his Victorian interpreters, and fiction by Stephen Crane, Frank Norris, Jack London, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Pauline Hopkins, and Edgar Rice Burroughs. Senior and Junior English majors only. Prerequisite: English 200 with a grade of C or better.

English 300 Junior Year Writing (old and new requirements: junior year requirement)

Lecture 4 TuTh 11:30-12:45 Instructor: Emily Lordi
Topic: The Black Memoir. Ever since the slave narratives, African American writers have consistently chosen the genre of memoir. They have used this literary form to communicate realities that the dominant culture has ignored or willfully suppressed, and to create black community through artful testimony to shared experience. This course will examine classic works of African American autobiography from the 19th to the 21st century. Our primary readings will include slave narratives by Frederick Douglass and Harriet Jacobs; autobiographical essays by W. E. B. Du Bois, Zora Neale Hurston, Ralph Ellison, and James Baldwin; and longer memoirs by Richard Wright, Malcolm X, Angela Davis, AudreLorde, and Barack Obama. Written assignments will include short close-readings, one presentation, drafts of essays, a midterm and final paper. English junior and senior majors only. Prerequisite: English 200 and one of the following two period survey distributions: 201, 202, 221, 268 or 269.

English 300 Junior Year Writing (old and new requirements: junior year requirement)
Lecture 5 TuTh 2:30-3:45 Instructor: Jordana Rosenberg
Topic: Pride and Prejudice + Zombies. This course pairs eighteenth-century novels and political theory with contemporary zombie films. It does so because eighteenth-century novels, political theory and zombie films share a number of vital structural features, first and foremost a concern with what constitutes social order. We will read novels from Defoe, Walpole, Sterne, and Austen, political theory from Locke, Burke, Hobbes, and Smith, and zombie films from Dahan, Khan, Romero, Marshall, and others. In doing so, we will trace the evolution of theories of social order from the early modern period to the present, with excursions into the following auxillary questions: how have representations of urban-rural relations changed over time? What is the relationship between conceptions of “public health/biopolitics” and the birth of the modern bureaucratic state? And what are the necessary conditions for creating sympathetic characters in literature/film? Can zombies ever be sympathetic characters? Senior and Junior English majors only. Prerequisite: English 200 and one of the following two period survey distributions: 201, 202, 221, 268 or 269.

English 300 Junior Year Writing (old and new requirements: junior year requirement)

Lecture 6 MW 4:00-5:15 Instructor: Hoang Phan
Topic: Melville and Modernity. Moby Dick, Melville's whale of a philosophical novel, continues recognized as one of the greatest of novels in the Western literary canon. This course will read a range of Melville's work - novels, novellas, short stories, and poetry - in relation to the historical transformations of modern America in the long nineteenth century.

While we will read his work historically, we will also read select literary criticism and modern literary theory which has taken Melville's work as the occasion for broader reflections on multiple aspects of modernity, such as race, class, gender and sexuality.

Readings will include: Typee; Moby Dick; The Confidence Man; Pierre, or, the Ambiguities; Benito Cereno; Bartleby the Scrivener; Billy Budd; Battle-Pieces and Aspects of the War. Senior and Junior English majors only. Prerequisite: English 200 and one of the following two period survey distributions: 201, 202, 221, 268 or 269.

English 319 Representing the Holocaust ALG (old and new requirements: elective)
Lecture 1 Tu 2:30-3:45 + discussion Instructor: James Young
In this course, we explore the ways history and memory of the Holocaust have been shaped for the next generation by victims in their diaries, by survivors in their memoirs, by novelists in their fiction, as well as by poets, video-testimony, film-makers, musicians, artists, monuments, and museums. Among readings and viewings for this course are works by Chaim A. Kaplan, Primo Levi, Elie Wiesel, Sara Nomberg-Przytyk, Tadeusz Borowski, Paul Celan, Nelly Sachs, Dan Pagis, and Art Spiegelman, among others.

369 Disc 1 Th 1:00-2:15 Instructor: J. Young

369 Disc 5 Th 10:00-11:15 TA:Lauren Silber

369 Disc 2 Th 2:30-3:45 TA: Eli Bromberg

369 Disc 6 Th 11:30-12:45 TA: Heather Wayne

369 Disc 3 Th 1:00-2:15 TA: Heather Wayne

369 Disc 7 Th 10:10-11:15 TA: Eli Bromberg

369 Disc 4 Th 11:30-12:45 TA: Lauren Silber

 


English 329H Tutoring Writing: Theory and Practice (old and new requirements: 300+ elective)

Lecture 1 TuTh 11:30-12:45 Instructor: Rebecca Lorimer Leonard
Prerequisite: Gen. Ed. College Writing 112 or 113 with a grade of "B" or better. Students interested in the course should submit an application to writingcenter@acad.umass.edu by April 4: (1) a formal letter explaining why the student is interested and has potential to become a writing tutor; (2) an academic writing sample (attached as a word or pdf file) and (3) the name and email address of the student’s 112 instructor or another instructor who can speak to the student's qualifications. Applications received after April 4 and before May 4 may be considered if seats are available. The strongest applications will be invited to an interview and can expect a decision by finals week.

English 341 Autobiography Studies (old and new requirements: 300+ elective)
Lecture 1 MW 2:30-3:45 Instructor: Laura Furlan
This course is a study of American Indian autobiography. We will read a variety of historical and contemporary texts, including visual or pictorial autobiography, collaborative or “as told to” autobiographies, memoirs, and autobiographical “fiction,” and we will consider the critical issues particular to this genre: the notion of authorship, modes of production, questions of authenticity, and the role of the editor and/or translator. Authors will include Samson Occum, William Apess, Zitkala-Sa, John G. Neihardt and Black Elk, N. Scott Momaday, Louise Erdrich, Allison Hedge Coke, and Peter Razor, among others. English majors only. Prerequisite: English 200 and one of the following two period survey distributions: 201, 202, 221, 268 or 269.

English 343 English Epic Tradition (old and new requirements: 300+ elective)

Lecture 1 TuTh 1:00-2:15 Instructor: Jim Freeman
Prerequisite: completion of English 200 and one of the following period survey courses-English 201, 202, 221, 268 or 269. No course description available at this time. English majors only. Prerequisite: English 200 and one of the following two period survey distributions: 201, 202, 221, 268 or 269.

English 354 Creative Writing: Introduction to Fiction (old and new requirements: 300+ elective)(creative writing specialization)
Lecture 1 MWF 1:25-2:15 Instructor: Zoe Rana Mungin
n this class, we will explore the idea of how we tell stories by breaking stories down into tangible mechanisms such as voice, place, character, and time. Be it conscious or unconscious, stories come to life through the choices we make about these components.

We’ll spend time reading and discussing the work of published writers with marginalized identities: women, hyphenated Americans and Canadians, writers from South America and the Caribbean. Reading these works will inform our conversations on the intersection of language, culture, and place in the development of voice, the necessity of voice in crafting character, paying special attention to how entire stories can pivot around character.

We will use our exploration of short fictions to inform our own writing. Students will submit two stories for workshop over the course of the class. Prerequisite: ENGLISH 200.

English 354 Creative Writing: Introduction to Poetry (old and new requirements: 300+ elective)(creative writing specialization)
Lecture 2 MWF 11:15-12:05 Instructor: Jonathan Ruseski
No course description at this time. Prerequisite: ENGLISH 200.

English 354 Creative Writing: Mixed Genre (old and new requirements: 300+ elective)(creative writing specialization)
Lecture 3 MWF 12:20-1:10 Instructor: Mary Taylor
In many ways, successful comedy hinges on surprise and subverting reader expectation. In this course we will examine how the female voice cultivates and distinguishes itself as a comedic temperament in contemporary short fiction and poetry. We will also seek to cultivate our own comedic voices in the creative writing we workshop throughout the semester. Through this process of reading and writing, we will consider and question how writers achieve humor by applying traditional modes (satire, burlesque, parody, farce) and crafting new, innovative forms. Specific critical attention will be given to the strategies authors employ to achieve their comedic ends, specifically as they relate to character, dialogue, point of view, and narrative pacing. Readings by Dorothy Parker, Grace Paley, Rachel B. Glaser, Ellen Gilchrist, and others. Prerequisite: ENGLISH 200.

English 355 Creative Writing: Fiction (old and new requirements: 300+ elective)(creative writing specialization)
Lecture 1 MW 2:30-3:45 Instructor: John Hennessy
English majors, BDIC, UWW, International/National exchange majors, or Masters students with TECS subplan only. Pre-requisite: ENGL 354 or 354H with a grade of a 'B' or better. Pre-requisites waived with instructor's permission.

In this course students will write and workshop short stories. They will also read widely in modern and contemporary fiction and complete a series of assignments intended to address specific aspects of fiction writing. Admission by permission of professor.

Students should submit one complete story and a brief personal statement (list and briefly discuss your reading preferences—your favorite writers and books) to Professor Hennessy’s email address: jjhennes@english.umass.edu. Please include Spire ID #. DUE APRIL 15.

Registration by instructor permission only.

English 355 Creative Writing: Fiction (old and new requirements: 300+ elective)(creative writing specialization)

Lecture 2 TuTh 2:30-3:45 Instructor: Kirby Farrell
In this course students will write and critique the group's fiction. We'll discuss the work stories do, but generating theories from actual artist/audience behavior, with some attention to practical challenges that writers face. Students should submit one complete story and a brief personal statement (list and briefly discuss your reading preferences—your favorite writers and books) to me at: kfarrell@english.umass.edu. Application deadline is April 15. Students will be notified of their status. Prerequisite: ENGL 354 or 354H with a grade of 'B' or better. Registration by department permission only.

English 356 Creative Writing: Poetry (old and new requirements: 300+ elective)(creative writing specialization)

Lecture 1 MW 2:30-3:45 Instructor: Martín Espada
English majors, BDIC, or UWW students only. Prerequisite: ENGL 354 or 354H with a grade of 'B' or better. Admission by permission of professor. Students should submit a portfolio of three poems with electronically as Word attachments to Professor Espada at mespada@english.umass.edu by April 15th, and he will notify students about their status (invited, not invited, or wait-listed) by May 15th. Registration after this date will be possible, but priority will be given to students who meet the April 15th deadline.

This is an advanced undergraduate poetry workshop. Students produce poems independently for review in class, review work submitted by others, and engage in writing exercises. There are two major objectives: 1) finding a voice, i.e. a distinct identity in terms of language and subject; and 2) reinforcing the fundamentals of writing poetry, with a particular emphasis on the image. The various strengths of student poems receive as much attention as those areas requiring improvement. The course text is Poetry Like Bread, an anthology providing models for class discussion and writing.

English 365 20th Century Literature of Ireland AL (old requirements: 300+ elective) (new requirements: global Anglophone/ethnic American literature or 300+ elective)
Lecture 1 TuTh 1:00-2:15 Instructor: Peggy O’Brien
The purpose of this course is, first of all, to read closely and carefully books by established Irish writers of this century including Joyce, Yeats, Synge and Heaney. Having no pretensions of being exhaustive, we will look at representative texts that provide an initial understanding of each writer. Beyond appreciating each work in its own right as literature, we will attempt to use these texts as springboards to explore key questions about Irish society, history and culture, especially literary activity. We will, for example, ask whether there really are separate native Irish and Anglo-Irish literary traditions. How do urban and rural motifs and attitudes figure? What are the differences between the experience of men and women in Ireland? What is the attitude toward history and geography in these writers? Towards the Catholic Church? What social mores are revealed, particularly with regard to family, tribe and nation? Class? The Irish language? How are Irish mythology and legend used? How has an oral tradition influenced a written one? How are idiom and dialect deployed, a unique Hiberno-English? Is there an identifiable Irish voice?

English 368H Modern American Drama Honors AL (old requirements: 2nd American or non-writing elective)(new requirements: 300+ elective)
Lecture 1 MW 2:30-3:45 Instructor: Daniel Sack
This course looks at selected plays by significant 20th Century American playwrights, with attention to dramatic form, historical context, influence and innovation. Students read at least one play per week. Requirements include participation in discussion sections, papers, a midterm and final. (Gen.Ed. AL)

English 371 African American Literature (old requirements: 2nd American or non-writing elective)(new requirements: 300+ elective)

Lecture 1 TuTh 2:30-3:45 Instructor: Emily Lordi
In this course we will study works of fiction, nonfiction, drama, poetry, and music by African American writers from the 1980s to the present. Authors include Toni Morrison, Sapphire, Percival Everett, August Wilson, Suzan-Lori Parks, Lucille Clifton, Tracy K. Smith, and KieseLaymon. Assignments will include short close-readings, one presentation, a midterm and final paper. English majors only. Prerequisite: English 200 and one of the following two period survey distributions: 201, 202, 221, 268 or 269.

English 374 20th Century American Literature (old requirements: 2nd American or non-writing elective)(new requirement 300+ elective)
Lecture 1 TuTh 2:30-3:45 Instructor: Asha Nadkarni
This course surveys major movements, authors and aesthetic modes in 20th century U.S. literature, paying particular attention to the ways in which the U.S. literary canon is both shaped and challenged by U.S. ethnic writers. Using the thematic of immigration and migration, we will concentrate on how U.S. writers negotiate issues of race, class, gender and sexuality. Throughout, we will focus on how particular texts give representational shape to the experiences they depict. Authors may include Willa Cather, Nathanael West, Jean Toomer, Maxine Hong Kingston, Junot Diaz, and Jhumpa Lahiri. English majors only. Prerequisite: English 200 and one of the following two period survey distributions: 201, 202, 221, 268 or 269.

English 375H American Poetry Honors (old requirements: 2nd American or non-writing elective)(new requirements: 300+ elective)

Lecture 1 TuTh 1:00-2:15 Instructor: Nicholas Bromell
This course approaches the field of American poetry by placing poems in conversation with each other. Each week we read 3-6 poems, and as we take note of their shared interests and their points of difference, we come to see that these overlappings and divergences are extraordinarily helpful in making each poem’s meaning clearer to us. We also come to see that poets are speaking to each other across time and space – that a poem by Langston Hughes or John Ashberyis quite literally talking with a poem by Walt Whitman. As we overhear such conversations, we come to understand these poems better.

The poets we read include Dickinson, Whitman, Stevens, Williams, Hughes, Brown, Bishop, Brooks, Merwin, Gizzi, Oliver, Bukowski, Gluck, and Wright (among others).

Here’s what we do in this class: Guided by the principle that a poem has a definite meaning, we figure out that meaning by trying to reach agreement about which way of reading a word, phrase, or line is better than other possible ways. In short, we work collaboratively and learn by doing. For this reason, I ask you to think deeply about and interpret poems before each class –to come to class with an interpretation of the poem (or of parts of the poem) that you are ready to share, explain, and defend. We spend almost all of class time sharing and discussing our individual interpretations of the poem and thereby building a collaborative interpretation that we as a group can reach consensus on.

Students who are interested in talking about poems and who wish to learn new ways of interpreting poems tend to really love this course. Students who don’t like to “over-analyze,” who don’t like to speak in class, and who believe that “a poem can mean whatever we want it to mean” tend to dislike it.

The text will be a course packet consisting of about 50 poems and 5 critical essays.

In addition to the class preparation noted above, students will write several short interpretive essays totaling 15-20 pages.

Open only to English majors. Prerequisite: completion of English 200 and two of the following courses: 201, 202, 221, 268, or 269.

English 376 American Fiction (old requirements: 2nd American or non-writing elective)(new requirements: 300+ elective)
Lecture 1 TuTh 11:30-12:45 Instructor: Joshua Lambert
What’s at stake in the production and consumption of literary fiction in the age of mass media? In the mid-20th-century U.S., the novel paradoxically reached the peak of its cultural influence and relevance at a moment of unprecedented availability ofcompelling alternative forms of narrative (television, film, and video games among others). This tension, between the novel as just another popular entertainment and the novel as a privileged site ofstorytelling, analysis, and critique, will be the frame through which we read and analyze key works of post-1945 American fiction. Readings will be complemented by attention to popular culture forms, and students will write analytical essays and complete research assignments. Authors considered may include Lionel Trilling, Flannery O’Connor, Saul Bellow, James Baldwin, John Updike, Thomas Pynchon, Susan Sontag, Don DeLillo, Raymond Carver, Joyce Carol Oates, Samuel Delaney, Jessica Hagedorn, Toni Morrison, Kathy Acker, George Saunders, and Chris Ware. Prerequisite: completion of English 200 and two of the following period survey courses-English 201, 202, 221, 268 or 269.

English 379 Introduction to Professional Writing I (old and new requirements: 300+ elective)(PWTC specialization)

Lecture 1 MWF 12:20-1:10 pm Instructor: David Toomey
This course offers an overview of commonly encountered professional genres such as memos, reports, job materials, and grant proposals. Students gain practice writing in these genres, with an emphasis on clarity and concision. They develop more sophisticated research skills and gain experience in communicating specialized information to non-specialist readers. Finally, they are exposed to the range of professional writing careers as they explore writing on both theoretical and practical planes through consideration of audience, as well as wider professional, social, and cultural contexts. Prereq.: ENGLWP 112 or equivalent; junior or senior status with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better. (3 credits).

English 379 Introduction to Professional Writing I (old and new requirements: 300+ elective)(PWTC specialization)
Lecture 2 TuTh 10:00-11:15 Instructor: Jessica Ouellette
See above for course description.

English 380 Professional Writing & Technical Communication I (old and new requirements: 300+ elective)(PWTC specialization)
Lecture 1 MWF 11:15-12:05 pm Instructor: Janine Solberg
Junior and Senior students with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better. Introduces principles of technical writing, software documentation, and page design. Simulates the writing/editing process used in the computer industry; students write a 20-25 page manual documenting a software product, usually Microsoft Word.

English 391AD The Personal Essay (old and new requirements: 300+ elective)(creative writing specialization)
Lecture 1 Th 4:00-6:30 pm Instructor: Marian MacCurdy
(fall 2013) The rigors of academia mandate that we write in one form or another for most of the first 21 years of our lives. After that we write to get jobs and to keep them, we write to engage in the commerce of our culture, and we write to communicate with others and with ourselves. This last genre is perhaps the least practiced but among the most important since writing is a process that helps us make meaning. Writing is both a verb and a noun; it represents our best thinking and helps us arrive at it. The irony of the term, the personal essay, is in learning to make rhetorical choices to help us to develop our own literary and personal values and describe the experiences that helped to generate them we begin a journey that ultimately takes us beyond ourselves and into the community, which can establish our common humanity. Prerequisite: completion of English 200 and one of the following period survey courses-English 201, 202, 221, 268 or 269.

English 391D Writing & Emerging Technologies (old and new requirements: 300+ elective)(non-fiction writing specialization)
Lecture 1 MW 2:30-3:45 Instructor: Janine Solberg
In this course, students will have an opportunity to compose with video. We will explore video as a rhetorical narrative medium, with emphasis on the actual production of non-fiction video work. Writing will be integrated into all aspects of the composing process: brainstorming and conceptualization, drafting and storyboarding, revision and critique. Class time will involve collaborative activities such as student-led software demonstrations, workshopping, and discussion of assigned readings. We will approach writing as a means of thinking, problem-solving, and creating in another medium (video). This course may be counted toward the non-fiction writing specialization. Prerequisite: completion of English 200 and two of the following period survey courses-English 201, 202, 221, 268 or 269.

English 412 History of the English Language (old and new requirements: 300+ elective)
Lecture 1 TuTh 1:00-2:15 Instructor: Stephen Harris
Why do people in MA sound different than people in NY? Have people always spoken like this? HEL is a thrilling ride through the major changes in English phonology, morphology, syntax, spelling, and vocabulary from the 5th century to the 21st century. Among the topics we will consider are historical change and dialectic difference, literacy and morality, the emergence of vernaculars and the decline of Latin, and the current state of English. No previous knowledge of linguistics, Anglo Saxon, or Middle English is required. English majors only. Prerequisite: English 200 and one of the following two period survey distributions: 201, 202, 221, 268 or 269.

English 491AC Working Yourself Up: Career Exploration
Lecture 1 W 4-5:15 pm Instructor: Janis Greve
(spring 2014) 2 credits. For students who wish to be pro-active in paving the road to employment both during and after the completion of their degree in English. Students will practice job search skills and receive individualized guidance in creating a cover letter and résumé of immediate use. Guests will represent careers appropriate for a background in English. In addition to the cover letter and résumé, assignments are likely to include attendance at campus career fairs and networking events, two interviews with professionals from fields of interest, and a short essay researching careers. Formerly pass/fail, the course is now graded and not an "easy" 2 credits, though the work required can form really stepping stones to a future beyond the major. Course prerequisite: Open only to English majors who completed English 200.

English 491AS The Arabian Nights in World Literature (old and new requirements: 300+ elective)
Lexture 1 TuTh 2:30-3:45 Instructor: Mazen Naous
Since first being translated into English the 18th century, The Arabian Nights has proved enduringly popular and is responsible for many of the images of the East and the Arab world that persist in present-day literary and cultural discourses. Images of tyrannical and lustful Sultans, harems, genies, magic lamps, and flying carpets have played a significant representational role in the West’s perception of the East as a fantastic, exotic, and dangerous place. By and large, The Arabian Nights is considered to be little more than entertainment; however, many writers have taken up the Nights in their works and have offered complex interpretations and reinventions of it. In addition to reading selections from Richard Burton’s famous translation, we will negotiate the presence of the Nights in English, South Asian, North African, South American, and North American works of fiction and film. Why are these writers fascinated with the Nights? How do their novels rework dominant perceptions of things Arabic and Eastern? How can we re-read the Nights in light of these global works of fiction? Literary and cultural theories will guide our readings and film viewings. English majors only. Prerequisite: English 200 and one of the following two period survey distributions: 201, 202, 221, 268 or 269.

English 491Z Poetry of the Political Imagination (old and new requirements: 300+ elective)

Lecture 1 Mon 5:30-8:00 Instructor: Martín Espada
Juniors and Seniors, International Exchange or National Exchange plans, or Graduate students with TECS subplans only. Poetry of the political imagination is a matter of both vision and language. Any progressive social change must be imagined first, and that vision must find its most eloquent possible expression to move from vision to reality. Poets have a role in this dynamic process. The poets of the political imagination studied in this course go beyond protest to define an artistry of dissent. The course addresses how best to combine poetry and politics, craft and commitment. Every week, students read and discuss one book by a poet of the political imagination, such as Walt Whitman, Wilfred Owen, Sterling Brown, Pablo Neruda, Allen Ginsberg, Marge Piercy or Carolyn Forché. Readings are also augmented on occasion by recordings of the poets. Students respond to these poets with papers, presentations, or some combination. English majors only. Prerequisite: English 200 and one of the following two period survey distributions: 201, 202, 221, 268 or 269.

English 492K The City in Literature: Forming Urbanity (old and new requirements: 300+ elective)
Lecture 1 TuTh 11:30-12:45 Instructor: Adam Zucker
This course focuses on imaginative responses to urban centers from three different periods – satire and dramatic comedy at the beginning of the 17th Century; prose fiction in the 19th Century and earlier 20th century; and the novel and visual media in our day – to explore the ways in which authors and audiences respond to the local and global developments that accompany urbanization. Our central texts – Jacobean city comedy and the often filthy satirical texts that accompanied it; Victorian and Edwardian fiction by Dickens and Conan Doyle; and current works by contemporary novelists – will give us opportunities to explore how literary form is met by and shaped within social and economic networks that the material spaces of the city make possible. In addition to our primary texts, we will read theory and criticism by, among others, David Harvey, Michel DeCerteau, Franco Moretti, and Sharon Marcus. Students will write two shorter response essays (one on a literary work and one on a critical essay) in addition to pursuing a longer research project in which they choose a contemporary novel, film, or other text to analyze with our work over the course of the semester in mind. Prerequisite: completion of English 200 and two of the following period survey courses-English 201, 202, 221, 268 or 269.

English 494DI Dystopian Games, Comics, Media (old and new requirements: Integrative Experience)
Lecture 1 W 5:30-8:00 Instructor: TreaAndrea Russworm
Open only to senior English majors. Prerequisite: completion of English 200 and one of the following period survey courses-English 201, 202, 221, 268 or 269. In this class, we will study video games, postmodern cultural theory, and (tangentially) comic books as we ask questions about the persistence of dystopian narratives in print and digital visual culture. For example, what do dystopian narratives in comics, video games, and new media productions have in common? What makes "dark," "moody," and outright apocalyptic narratives like The Walking Dead, Half-Life 2, Left 4 Dead, Sweet Tooth and the web series Down Twisted popular in this current historical moment? Can postmodern cultural theory help us better understand some of the social and political ramifications of dystopian culture? Further, can the theory make more clear how such stories envision the perils of the future in ways that inadvertently comment on our current times? Is it possible that the cautionary tales of dystopian narratives might, if heeded, make the world a better place? We will compare different game genres in order to make arguments about the types of anxieties, fears, and dreams that get articulated in RPG games like Fallout 3, shooters like BioShock, war games like Metal Gear Solid 4, and in third person action games like Grand Theft Auto IV. Important note: This class will follow a team-based discussion format, meaning all students will be asked to play a leading role in class discussions and will be required to work closely on digital projects and select other assignments with members of a team. Access to an Xbox 360 or Playstation 3 is not required but it is strongly preferred. This a "General Education Integrative Experience" class and all students will receive credit as such. In the context of our major the General Education Integrative Experience means certain learning objectives will be emphasized: critical thinking and writing, persuasive communication, creative and analytical thinking, pluralistic perspective and team-building, working collaboratively, developing technological literacy, and applying what you are learning at UMass to the world beyond college and your individual experiences.English senior majors only. Prerequisite: English 200 and one of the following two period survey distributions: 201, 202, 221, 268 or 269.

English 494PI Pros and Cons (old and new requirements: Integrative Experience)
Lecture 1 M 5:30-8:00 Instructor: Ernest Gallo
Open only to senior English majors. Prerequisite: completion of English 200 and one of the following period survey courses-English 201, 202, 221, 268 or 269. We examine eight areas in which the sciences intersect with the humanities. Each student will give a ten minute presentation. There are four open book essay exams; no final. English senior majors only. Prerequisite: English 200 and one of the following two period survey distributions: 201, 202, 221, 268 or 269.

English 499C Capstone Course (old and new requirements: 300+ elective)(creative writing specialization)
Lecture 1 MW 4:00-5:15 Instructor: John Hennessy
Foundations and Departures in Creative Writing: Fiction, Poetry, and Literary Non-Fiction is a multi-genre, two-semester course in creative writing designed to help students complete a Capstone project within the genre of their choice. Both a class in contemporary literature and a writing workshop, Foundations and Departures will offer students a wide variety of reading assignments and writing exercises from across all three genres. At the end of the first semester students will submit a portfolio of original work; in the second semester students will finish drafting and revising their Capstone projects. Textbooks will include two fiction anthologies (Charlie Chan Is Dead 2 and The Art of the Story), novels by Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Virginia Woolf, and Milan Kundera, memoir by Helene Cooper, non-fiction by Joan Didion, poetry collections by Major Jackson, Katia Kapovich, and other contemporary poets.

Interested students should submit a personal statement: 1-2 pages, list and briefly discuss your reading preferences: favorite books, writers, poems, poets, etc.; also, tell me if you are a student in Commonwealth College—some priority will be given to ComColl students, but some of the most successful students in 499 in past years have come from outside Commonwealth College. Also include a writing sample—one complete story or essay, or twenty pages from a longer work, or 5-10 poems. Some combination of the previous list is also permitted.

SEND TO: jjhennes@english.umass.edu by APRIL 15.