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Ron Welburn

Professor

rwelburn@english.umass.edu

E463 South College

Ron Welburn, professor, teaches 19th and 20th century American literatures, Native literatures, critical writing, and a western hemisphere course called Américas Fictions. For American studies he encourages the practice of oral history, and encourages cultural studies foundations with musicology and indigenous intersections. He hold degrees from Lincoln U (PA), Arizona, and NYU’s Program in American Civilization. Ron served as director of the department’s American Studies Graduate Concentration, and co-founded and directed the Certificate Program in Native American Indian Studies (Anthropology).  He has led teacher workshops and book discussions for the Five College Public School Partnership, state arts and humanities councils in New York, Connecticut, and Massachusetts, and for the Mashantucket Pequot Library and Research Center. His book reviews have appeared in CHOICE, American Indian Culture and Research Journal, and elsewhere. Ron also reviewed jazz recordings for JazzTimes and Down Beat, and coordinated the Jazz Oral History Project at Rutgers Newark’s Institute of Jazz Studies. A widely published poet, he has seven books to his credit. He is of Gingaskin Cherokee, Assateague, Lenape, and African American descent.

 

Research areas:

Native American literatures, Eastern Native literatures, ethnohistories and identities; American and Indigenous studies theories and methods; jazz studies in global context.

Recent Publications:

Hartford’s Ann Plato and the Native Borders of Identity (SUNY Press, 2015)

Roanoke and Wampum: Topics in Native American Heritage and Literatures (Peter Lang 2001),
         2002 co-winner of the Wordcraft Circle of the Americas Creative Prose-
         Nonfiction Award.

Council Decisions: Selected Poems, Revised & Expanded Edition (Bowman
         Books 2012)

“Theorizing Native Studies in the Northeast.” American Indian Culture and
          Research Journal
(33.4 2009): 69–89.

“Native Americans in Jazz, Blues, and Popular Music.” In indiVisible: African-
           Native American 
Lives in the Americas. (Washington, D.C.:
         Smithsonian, National Museum of the American 
Indian, 2009). 201–09.

“A Most Secret Identity: Native American Assimilation and Identity
         Resistance in African America.” In Confounding the Color-Line: The
        Indian-Black Experience in America
. Ed. James Brooks (Nebraska, 2002):
       292–320.

 

Photo of Professor Welburn taken by Lindsay Ormond (B.A. 2014).