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University of Massachusetts Amherst

University of Massachusetts Amherst

English Department


Graduate Students in Other Specializations

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Faune Albert

Faune Albert received her BA in Cultural Studies, Literature, and Creative Writing from Hampshire College and completed her MA in English at UMass Amherst.  She is currently working on her PhD in American Literature and developing a focus in the literature and history of the U.S South.  She is interested in exploring the intersections between race, class, gender, and sexuality, and thinking about the relationship between psychological and physical experiences of embodiment.  Other related interests include, broadly, Lacanian psychoanalytic theory, utopian thought, spatiality and temporality, and the relationships between history, memory, and the body.  She is also currently completing the Certificate in Advanced Feminist Thought through the Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Program at UMass. 
Conferences
"Reading Larsen with Lacan:  Recovering the Racial Body in Nella Larsen`s Quicksand." Psychologies of Space in 20th and 21st Century Literature.  American Comparative Literature Association. Toronto.  April 2013. 
"All Her Words and the Spaces In-Between:  Writing Subjectivity in Dorothy Osborne`s Letters."  Gender and Genre.  Northeast Modern Language Association.  Boston. March 2013."

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Michelle Brooks

Michelle holds a BA and MA in English from California State University, Long Beach. She is currently working on her PhD in English with an emphasis in medieval literature. Her research interests include: Old English Literature, Anglo-Saxon literary production, heroic narratives, and contemporary medievalism. Michelle has presented at the Medieval Association of the Pacific Annual Conference, the Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association Annual Conference, and the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Students’ Association Annual Graduate Conference.
Conferences
 “Online Medievalism: Racializing Beowulf and The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle,” Medieval Association of the Pacific 2013 Conference, University of San Diego, March 22, 2013.

“Twice is the Charm: Decapitating Heads and Undermining Female Agency in the Old English Judith,” with Alin Yessaian, 5th Annual Graduate Conference, Center for Medieval and Renaissance Students’ Association, California State University, Long Beach, February 23, 2013.
“Slippage of the ‘Heroic Code’ and Contextual Identity in The Battle of Maldon,” 110th Annual Conference of the Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association, Seattle University, October 20, 2012.
“Old English Poetry, Germanic Inheritance, and Scholarship’s Desires for the ‘Heroic Code,’” 4th Annual Graduate Conference, Center for Medieval and Renaissance Students’ Association, California State University, Long Beach, February 25, 2012.
Performance of Interludium de Clerico et Puella, 4th Annual Graduate Conference, Center for Medieval and Renaissance Students’ Association, California State University, Long Beach, February 25, 2012.
“Rapping Chaucer: Digital Media, Baba Brinkman, and The Miller’s Tale,” 3rd Annual Graduate Conference, Center for Medieval and Renaissance Students’ Association, California State University, Long Beach, April 2, 2011."

Contact Michellel Brooks

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Emily Campbell

Emily Campbell holds a BA in History and English, with a concentration in Creative Writing, from Hollins University. She is an MA-PhD candidate in English at UMass Amherst, with a focus on contemporary (cross)genre texts. In addition to theories of genre, her research interests address the interplay between gender, performance, affect, and temporality. Emily is co-chair of the 2014 English Graduate Organization interdisciplinary conference "Close Encounters: Remapping Discipline through Genre." She is also a Graduate Student Senate representative for the English Department.
Conferences
"Co-chair, ""Close Encounters: Remapping Discipline through Genre"": University of Massachusetts Amherst English Graduate Organization Conference. Amherst, Massachusetts. March 2014.
"What the reader should know: Poetics and the Performativity of Self-Deconstruction." Poetry, Politics, and Performance. ""Between Surface and Depth"": University of Wisconsin-Madison English Department Graduate Student Conference. Madison, Wisconsin. February 2013."

Contact Emily Campbell

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Annaliese Hoehling

Annaliese Hoehling holds a BA in English (Henderson State University), MA in English Literature, and MFA in Literary Translation (University of Arkansas).  After receiving her MFA, Annaliese worked for several years in the nonprofit sector before returning to pursue her PhD, with a focus on British Modernisms and fin de siècle fiction, in the fall of 2013.  Her interests include narrative and feminist theory; transnational inquiries and readings; cosmopolitan/metropolitan modernity; and textual facilitation of encounter.  Currently teaching freshman composition in the Writing Program at UMass, she has previously taught Basic Writing, Advanced Composition, and World Literature. She has served as an officer for the Graduate Students in English at the University of Arkansas, and was co-director of the Arkansas Writers in the Schools (WITS) program from 2003-2005.
Publications
“Eucalyptus, Dead and Burning in the Sun” by Patricia Suárez, Translated from the Spanish.  AGNI Online 2004.
“Arugula” by Patricia Suárez, Translated from the Spanish. New Orleans Review May 2004.
“An Encounter on a Train” by Patricia Suárez, Translated from the Spanish. The Literary Review Winter 2004.

Contact Annaliese Hoehling

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Sunmi Kang

Sunmi received her MA from Seoul National University in Korea (2010) and is currently a PhD candidate at UMass Amherst, working on nineteenth century British literature. Her research interests include gender and sexuality studies, queer theory, critical theory, psychoanalysis, cultural studies.

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Amy Lanham

Amy is a PhD student in the English Department. Recently, she spent a year in the School of Education earning her Secondary Education License as well. Her research interests include trauma and memorial sites in WWI, writing under the influence of alcohol and opium in Victorian Literature, and social justice in education.

Contact Amy Lanham

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Ashley Nadeau

Ashley Nadeau received her BA in Literature from American University and completed her MA in English at UMass Amherst. She is currently working on her PhD in English Literature with a focus on nineteenth century British fiction. Her current research interests include feminist and narrative theory; sensation and crime fiction; architectural history and human geography; and the relationship between bodies, space, movement, gender and empire. Her essay "Exploring Women: Virginia Woolf's Imperial Revisions from The Voyage Out to Mrs. Dalloway" will appear in the summer 2014 issue of the journal Modern Language Studies. Ashley has also presented at the North Eastern Modern Language Association's annual conference, the North American Victorian Studies Association Annual Conference, the American Studies Association Annual Conference, the American Comparative Literature Annual Conference, and the UMass English Graduate Conference.

Conferences
“’Master of the dreadful position’: Mesmerism in Wilkie Collins’s The Woman in White.” Bodies of Evidence Seminar. North American Victorian Studies Association Conference. October 2013.
"Ideal-ic Roots: Dreams, Discontents, and Consciousness." Citizen and Its Discontents: University of Massachusetts English Graduate Conference. Panel Chair. March 2013.
“Boundary-less Women and Business Women: Disentangling Poe’s Invention of the Detective Fiction Genre.” American Studies Association. November 2012.
“Breaking the Body: Tracing the Matrix of Narrative Frames, British Colonialism, and Bodily Harm in the Victorian Novel.” American Comparative Literature Association. March 2012.
“Corporeal Horrors: What Frame Narratives Can Tell Us about Victorian Anxiety.” University of Massachusetts English Graduate Organization Conference. April 2010.

Publications
“Exploring Women: Virginia Woolf’s Imperial Revisions from The Voyage Out to Mrs. Dalloway.” Forthcoming in Modern Language Studies. Summer 2014.

Awards
John Hicks Prize for best graduate essay on a literary subject exclusive of Shakespeare 2013.
Lee Anne Smith White Award for best UMass graduate essay in American Studies. 2013.
2012 Postcolonial Studies Association / Journal of Postcolonial Writing Postgraduate Essay Prize - Runner-up with Special Mention for  “A Woman’s ‘Horror’: Gender and Position in the British Empires of Heart of Darkness, The Voyage Out, and Mrs. Dalloway.”

Contact Ashley Nadeau