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University of Massachusetts Amherst

University of Massachusetts Amherst

English Department

Faculty Profiles: Deborah Carlin

Contact Information:
156 Bartlett Hall
UMass
Amherst, MA 0l003
p: 413-545-2329
f: 413-545-3880
carlin@english.umass.edu

Professor

Deborah Carlin is a Professor of English at UMass, where she has taught since 1987. She holds a B.A., magna cum laude, in Literature (English & French) from the University of California, San Diego (1979), and an M.A. and Ph.D. in English and American Literature from Harvard University (1983, 1987), as well as a Master's Degree in Clinical Social Work from Smith College (1994). She has twice won distinguished teaching awards, at Harvard University (1984) and at UMass Amherst (1996).

She is the author of Cather, Canon, and the Politics of Reading (1992), and the editor of Queer Cultures (2003), a course textbook and essay anthology, and the Broadview Edition of Sarah Orne Jewett's The Country of the Pointed Firs and Dunnet Landing Tales (2009). Professor Carlin has published several articles and reviews on Willa Cather and on Cather scholarship, as well as on Edith Wharton; African American literary criticism and theory; 19th-Century American women's philanthropic fiction; trauma, narrative, and multiple personality; graduate internship programs in the humanities; queer theory and the American novel; and how queer theory shaped an intersectional approach to a general education course on “Gender, Sexuality, Literature and Culture.”

Her primary teaching focus is on 20th- and 21st -century North American fiction; other teaching interests include: narrative in global cinema; literature and pedagogy; trauma and representation; animal studies; queer theory; and psychological issues within literature.

Her current book project examines narrative returns and intertextual dialogues in the fictions of Jim Grimsley, Doris Lessing, Margaret Atwood, J.M. Coetzee, and Walter Mosley, all of which operate beyond and in excess of how we understand the nature of the sequel in narrative. She is also working on a novel, Rappings, about Kate Fox, the younger of the two sisters who began the spiritualist movement in the U.S. in 1848.