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Courses

Online Courses

Econ 103: Introduction to Microeconomics | Econ 104: Introduction to Macroeconomics | Econ 105: Introduction to Political Economy | Econ 203: Intermediate Microeconomic Theory | Econ 204: Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory | Econ 305: Marxian Economics | Econ 311: Money and Banking | Econ 362: American Economic History | Econ 371: Comparative Economic Systems | Econ 397GR: The Great Recession: 2008-? | Econ 397LE: Law and Economics

Online registration and information about course costs is available through the Office of Continuing and Professional Education at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Questions? Email us: online@econs.umass.edu.

Econ 103: Introduction to Microeconomics
Introduction to the economics of markets and market economies. Basic concepts of demand, supply, production, prices, allocation of resources, and distribution of income. Public policy applications. Detailed course description. (Gen.Ed. SB)
Offered online during spring 2014.

Econ 104: Introduction to Macroeconomics
Economic theory of the macro-economy. Determinants of unemployment rates, inflation rates, national income, GDP. Tools of public policy available which can be used to promote macroeconomic goals. Detailed course description. (Gen.Ed. SB)
Offered online during spring 2014.

Econ 105: Introduction to Political Economy
Introduction to economic analysis for majors and nonmajors. Facts and concepts basic to understanding the U.S. economy today. Topics may include: unemployment, economic development, inequality, technology, social wealth, environment, government economic policy, economic alternatives, race and gender, and discrimination. Contrasting theoretical perspectives. Detailed course description. (Gen.Ed. SB, U)

Econ 203: Intermediate Microeconomic Theory
Consumer behavior, theory of the firm, markets, income distribution, general equilibrium, welfare economics. Detailed course description.  Offered online during spring 2014.

Econ 204: Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory
Analysis of theories of determination of national income, aggregate employment, and the price level. Monetary and fiscal policy. Inflation, unemployment, and economic growth. Detailed course description.

Econ 305: Marxian Economics
Introduction to Marxian theory and modern political economy. Logic and methods of Marxian analysis of economic change; comparisons between Marxian and non-Marxian theories. Detailed course description.

Econ 311: Money and Banking
The nature and functions of money and the significance of monetary circulation, commercial banks, the Central Bank, the non-bank financial institutional structure; integration of monetary theory into a general theory of economic activity, employment, prices. Prerequisites: ECON 103 or RES-ECON 102, ECON 104 and ECON 204. Detailed course description.

Econ 362: American Economic History
Economic development in the U.S. from colonial era to present. America as a raw materials producer, an agrarian society, and an industrial nation. Possible topics: development of economic systems, demographic trends, industrialization, regional development, growth of large-scale enterprise and organized labor, changing role of government. Detailed course description. (Gen.Ed. HS)

Econ 371: Comparative Economic Systems
Evaluation and comparison of the structure and performance of alternative economic systems. Topics include: mechanisms of resource allocation and pricing, institutions of government policy, organization of work and labor relations, international trade and finance, and income distribution. Prerequisite: ECON 103 or RESECON 102. Detailed course description.

Econ 397GR: The Great Recession: 2008-?
The US economy entered its most serious post-war recession in 2007. Five years later, unemployment remains high with nearly 7 million fewer jobs than when the recession began. Its magnitude and duration make this great recession a problem for economic policy and theory. In contrast with the failed policies of the Federal Reserve and Hoover Administration in the early 1930s, the Bernanke Federal Reserve and the Obama Administration have conducted aggressive monetary and fiscal policy which stanched the bleeding and stopped the collapse before reaching the dimensions of the Great Depression of the 1930s, without promoting a sustained recovery. We will discuss the appropriate economic policy for the United States and its major trading partners and consider the implications of the Great Recession for our understanding of macroeconomic theory. Detailed course description.

Econ 397LE: Law and Economics
In this course, we will look at the legal system as an economic system, where penalties act as prices for various activities. We will ask whether the enforcement of legal rules leads to an efficient allocation of resources. Much of the focus of the course will be on property, contract and tort. Detailed course description.


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