Ina Ganguli

Ina Ganguli
Assistant Professor
904 Thompson Hall
545-6230

Education: 

Ph.D., Harvard University, 2011
M.P.P., University of Michigan, 2004
B.A., Northwestern University, 2001

Professional Experience: 

Assistant Professor, Department of Economics, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 2015 - present
Core Faculty, Computational Social Science Institute (CSSI), University of Massachusetts Amherst, 2015 – present
Affiliated Researcher, SITE, Stockholm School of Economics, 2015 - present
Fellow, Institute for Quantitative Social Sciences (IQSS), Harvard University, 2012 – present
Fellow, Center for International Development (CID), Harvard University, 2011 – present
Assistant Professor, SITE, Stockholm School of Economics, 2012-2014
Postdoctoral Fellow, Harvard Business School-Harvard Medical School Innovation Lab, 2011-2012

Research Interests: 

Labor economics, Economics of Science & Innovation, Development Economics, Economic History.
Recent research has focused on migration of high-skill workers, gender differences in the labor market, social entrepreneurship and scientific collaboration.
Regional expertise on Russia, Ukraine and other countries of the former Soviet Union.

Teaching: 

Economics 341: Labor Economics
Economics 452: Econometrics

Honors and Awards: 

Institute for Social Science Research (ISSR) Scholar, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 2015-2016
W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research Dissertation Award, Honorable Mention, 2011
Allyn A. Young Teaching Prize for excellence in teaching Principles of Economics, Harvard University (2009)
U.S. Fulbright Scholar, Ukraine (2004)

Grants: 

  • NESTA Innovation Growth Lab Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Growth Experiments Research Grant, 2014-2016.
  • SEFORIS Social Entrepreneurship Research Program, European Commission, 2014-2016.
  • Social Science Research Council (SSRC) Eurasia Program Postdoctoral Fellowship (US State Department, Title VIII), 2012-2014.

Affiliations: 

American Economic Association
Association for Comparative Economic Studies

Selected Publications: 

"It’s Good to Be First: Order Bias in Reading and Citing NBER Working Papers" (with Daniel Feenberg, Patrick Gaulé and Jonathan Gruber), Review of Economics and Statistics (Forthcoming).

"Immigration & Ideas: What Did Russian Scientists 'Bring' to the US?" The Journal of Labor Economics, ​Vol. 33, No. S1, pp. S257-S288 (Part 2, July 2015).

"Why and Wherefore of Increased Scientific Collaboration" (with Richard Freeman and Raviv Murciano-Goroff), in Adam Jaffe and Benjamin Jones (eds), The Changing Frontier: Rethinking Science and Innovation Policy, National Bureau of Economic Research & University of Chicago Press (2015).

"Who Leaves and Who Stays? Evidence on Immigrant Selection from the Collapse of Soviet Science", in Aldo Geuna (ed), Global Mobility of Research Scientists: The Economics of Who Goes Where and Why, Elsevier (2015).

"Scientific Brain Drain and Human Capital Formation After the End of the Soviet Union. International Migration, 52: 95–110 (2014).

"Closing The Gender Gap In Education: What Is The State Of Gaps In Labour Force Participation For Women, Wives And Mothers?" (with Ricardo Hausmann and Martina Viarengo), International Labour Review 153: 173–207 (2014).

"Marriage, Education and Assortative Mating in Latin America" (with Ricardo Hausmann and Martina Viarengo), Applied Economics Letters 21(12), 806-811 (2014).

"Russian-American Scientific Collaboration" in Y.P. Tretyakov (ed), Russian-Аmerican Links: Leaps Forward and Backward in Academic Cooperation. St. Petersburg, Russia: Nestor-Historia, pp. 120-135 (2012).

"The Dynamics of the Gender Gap: How do Countries Rank in Terms of Making Marriage and Motherhood Compatible with Work?" (with Ricardo Hausmann and Martina Viarengo) in Ricardo Hausmann, Laura D. Tyson, Saadia Zahidi (eds), The Global Gender Gap Report 2009. Geneva: The World Economic Forum (2009).

"Institutions, Markets and Men's and Women's Wage Inequality: Evidence from Ukraine" (with Katherine Terrell), Journal of Comparative Economics, 34(2): 200-227 (2006).