The Training of Leaders in Speech Language Pathology as Effective Collaborators in the Public Schools

(U.S. DOE HR325D080042)
Grant Active from September 2008 to May 2013

The purpose of this doctoral level training grant was to educate and prepare leaders in Speech and Language Pathology (SLP) who effectively collaborated with school personnel to improve outcomes for students with communicative disabilities. The SLP doctoral scholars received training in collaborative intervention and leadership skills necessary to become effective faculty leaders who educate our future speech language pathologists who will serve the public schools.

The doctoral scholars enrolled in this project participated in a graduate program that led to the acquisition of knowledge and skills that promote improved educational outcomes for students with communicative disabilities. Over a period of 4 years the SLP doctoral scholars benefited from a course of study that provided training in collaboration, supervision, organization and management, and service delivery. The doctoral scholars were expected to: 1) supervise masters level scholars engaged in practica in the public schools; 2) teach college level courses in the speech language pathology and special education program; and 3) conduct research related to the provision of speech language pathology services in the schools. In addition, doctoral scholars were given the opportunity to complete a state or Federal level internship to increase their awareness of the effects of social and educational policy on the practice of speech language pathology in the schools.

The Department of Communication Disorders and Special Education Concentration at the University of Massachusetts collaborated on the implementation of this project by blending a shared a knowledge-base about best leadership practices and policies for serving students with communicative disabilities and evidence-based approaches for school environments. With the adoption of No Child Left Behind, speech language pathologists were called upon to deliver services to scholars with disabilities within the general education setting. This grant project required doctoral trainees minored in special education, so they were able to communicate the knowledge traditions and demonstrate evidenced-based practices in both speech and language pathology and special education that enabled them to confront possibilities and problems associated with creating “inclusive” learning environments for students with communicative disabilities from diverse backgrounds. Accountability for performance results and high standards and efforts to educate students with communicative disabilities in the general education classroom have become the focus in the public schools.

Funding was provided for a 48-month period to support a total of five (5) full-time and two (2) part-time doctoral scholars who completed course work and successfully earned a Doctor of Philosophy in Speech Language Pathology. Doctoral trainees completed the minor field in Department of Pupil Services and Student Development in the College of Education outside the Department of Communication Disorders. Doctoral scholars also work in collaboration with grant-related faculty in the Departments of Psychology and Linguistics.

Faculty

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Mary V. Andrianopoulos, Ph.D., CCC-SLP

Associate Professor, Department of Communication Disorders, University of Massachusetts Amherst

Clinical voice disorders, multicultural voice differences, motor speech disorders, neurological bases of speech and language disorders, differential diagnosis of speech and language disorders, and developmental and acquired neurological communication disorder

B.S., University of Vermont, 1979; M.S., University of Utah, 1983, Ph.D., 1988; Post-doctoral Fellow, Mayo Clinic, 1988-1990; CCC-SLP

358 North Pleasant St., Amherst,MA 01003

(413)545-0551

mva@comdis.umass.edu

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Mary Lynn Boscardin, Ph.D., CCC-SLP

Professor and Chair of the Department of Student Development, University of Massachusetts Amherst

Data Use and Evidence-Based Practices in Special Education Administration; Special Education Finance; Special Education Organization and Management; Inclusion of Students with Disabilities; Service Delivery Models for Students with Disabilities.

B.S., Illinois, 1975; M.S., Wisconsin, 1976; Ph.D., Illinois, 1984.

Hills House South, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst,MA 01003

(413)545-1193

mlbosco@educ.umass.edu

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Shelley L. Velleman, Ph.D., CCC-SLP

Associate Professor, Department of Linguistics, University of Massachusetts Amherst

Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin, Linguistics, 1983; M.A., University of Massachusetts, Communication Disorders, 1985; M.A., University of Wisconsin, Applied English Linguistics, 1978; B.A., Wellesley College, Comparative Literature, 1976

Shelley.Velleman@uvm.edu

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Adrian Staub, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Massachusetts Amherst

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Lisa Green, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Department of Linguistics, University of Massachusetts Amherst

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DOE Leadership Fellows 2008-2013

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Michelle Boisvert, M.A., CCC-SLP

Doctoral Fellow

Demonstrating evidence based practices and establishing service delivery methods of telepractice for individuals diagnosed with ASD.

B.S., University of New Hampshire, 1997; M.S., University of Massachusetts, 2005. Ph.D. – May 2012

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Marchil J. Boucher, M.A., CCC-SLP

Doctoral Fellow

Motor speech and voice disorders in children with autism spectrum disorders.

A.A. (Liberal Arts) Holyoke Community College 2005, B.S. (Communication Disorders) UMass Amherst 2007, M.A. (Speech Language Pathology) UMass Amherst 2009, Ph.D. – Expected Year of Graduation: 2013

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Alyssa R. Currier, M.A., CCC-SLP

Doctoral Fellow

Phonological development and disorders, phonological awareness, and pre-literacy instruction. Other areas of interests include speech sound disorders of children with autism and rare genetic syndromes, including Williams syndrome and 7q11.23 Duplication.

B.S., University of Massachusetts-Amherst, 2005; M.A., University of Massachusetts-Amhest, 2007, Ph.D – Expected Year of Graduation: 2013

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Kristina Curro, M.A., CCC-SLP

Doctoral Fellow

Kristina’s research interests focus on using eye-tracking to investigate receptive language and discourse abilities of children with Autism Spectrum Disorders and developing evidenced-based interventions for school-aged children.

B.A.: Brain and Cognitive Sciences, University of Rochester 1998, M.A.: Communication Disorders, University of Massachusetts Amherst 2007, Ph.D. – Expected Year of Graduation: 2013

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Nerissa Hall, M.A., CCC-SLP

Doctoral Fellow

The development of intervention practices and a training program for individuals, professionals, and family members of individuals using augmentative and alternative communication (AAC).

B.S., University of Massachusetts-Amherst, 2005; M.A., University of Massachusetts-Amhest, 2007, Ph.D – Expected Year of Graduation: 2013

Jacklyn Mason, M.A. CCC-SLP

Doctoral Fellow

The aim of my research is to explore the use of a structured teaching module designed to minimize the Black-White achievement gap in Writing proficiency for elementary age students who are speakers of African-American English dialect.

Sandra Stark, M.A., CCC-SLP

Doctoral Fellow