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CREWH Research Scholars Program 2012-13

CREWH Research Scholars program provides early and mid-career faculty working in women’s health with the support and protected time essential to developing successful proposals for external research funding.  Throughout the year, Scholars attend biweekly working group meetings at which they share project aims and grant application text and get feedback.  Scholars have the chance to consult with experts on statistical methods, budgeting strategies, identifying funding sources, and grant writing. Additionally, each Research Scholar may identify an expert in their research area to invite to campus to consult on their research and grant proposals. 

In accepting the fellowship, Research Scholars agree to submit 1 or more grant proposals within 1 semester of the end of their fellowship year.  For all grants awarded to Research Scholars as a result of their work during their fellowship year, the SPHHS Dean and Chair of the Research Scholar’s home department will provide CREWH one half of their portion of the award’s indirect costs.

Eligibility
All School of Public Health and Health Sciences faculty conducting research related to women’s health are eligible.  Although emphasis is placed on early career faculty research development, faculty from all ranks are encouraged to apply. 

To Apply Please complete the application form.
Application Deadline: February 10, 2012
Award decisions expected to be made by:  February 17, 2012

Applications can be sent via email to Sara Sabelawski at sara@schoolph.umass.edu. Please contact Sara with any questions via email or by phone at 413-545-8633.

 

UMass Amherst School of Public Health and Health Sciences Wins $2.5 Million Training Grant

Training to improve the nation’s public health system by strengthening the technical, scientific, managerial and leadership competence of current and future public health workers will soon be underway in the western Massachusetts communities of Springfield, Holyoke, Pittsfield and the Berkshires, supported by a four-year, $2.5 million grant to the School of Public Health and Health Sciences (SPHHS) at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. [Read more]

 

Past News

March 2012

Elizabeth Bertone-Johnson, Associate Professor of Epidemiology, has co-written an invited commentary for the journal Archives of Internal Medicine. She discusses a new study by Italian researchers suggesting that a single ultra-high dose of vitamin D may help women with painful menstrual periods. [Read more]

 

January 2012

Winter Blues Bumming You Out?

The research of Elizabeth Bertone-Johnson, Associate Professor of Epidemiology, is cited in a story appearing in MSN Health on how vitamin D may affect mental health, especially in winter when many people suffer from seasonal affective disorder.
Read more...

 

CREWH Research Scholars Program 2012-13

CREWH Research Scholars program provides early and mid-career faculty working in women’s health with the support and protected time essential to developing successful proposals for external research funding.  Throughout the year, Scholars attend biweekly working group meetings at which they share project aims and grant application text and get feedback.  Scholars have the chance to consult with experts on statistical methods, budgeting strategies, identifying funding sources, and grant writing. Additionally, each Research Scholar may identify an expert in their research area to invite to campus to consult on their research and grant proposals. [Read More]

 

UMass Amherst School of Public Health and Health Sciences Wins $2.5 Million Training Grant

Training to improve the nation’s public health system by strengthening the technical, scientific, managerial and leadership competence of current and future public health workers will soon be underway in the western Massachusetts communities of Springfield, Holyoke, Pittsfield and the Berkshires, supported by a four-year, $2.5 million grant to the School of Public Health and Health Sciences (SPHHS) at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. [Read more]

 

October, 2010
Dr. Susan R. Sturgeon from the Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Department of Public Health was recently awarded a $164,227 grant from the American Institute for Cancer Research.  Dr. Sturgeon will study whether pomegranate juice may beneficially affect hormone levels in postmenopausal women, and thereby reduce risk of breast cancer.  Dr. Sturgeon provided this summary of her research project:

The goal of this study is to gain an understanding of the biologic mechanisms by which pomegranate juice may alter breast cancer risk.  In experimental studies, pomegranate has been shown to reduce estrogen synthesis, and to inhibit cell proliferation. Conversely, some other laboratory data suggest that pomegranate may have estrogenic effects on breast tissue. Very limited research on the effects of pomegranate juice on markers of breast cancer risk in humans has been conducted, despite rising popularization due its putative health benefits for prevention of cancer, cardiovascular disease, arthritis and other conditions. We will examine differences in hormone levels in blood before and after a three-week intervention of a daily glass of pomegranate juice in 40 postmenopausal women as compared to 40 similar women who consume a control beverage for three weeks.  In a small group of women assigned to each of the two interventions, we will also explore differences in hormone biomarker levels in nipple aspirate fluid. Markers of interest include serum levels of hormones (estradiol, estrone, sex-hormone binding globulin, testosterone, androstenedione) and nipple aspirate fluid levels of estradiol and cathepsin D (an estrogen-inducible protein).