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IPM Message 2010

Historical Messages:  2010  | 2009  |  2008  |  2007  |  2006  | 2005  | 2004

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April 8 April 16 April 22 April 29 May 7 May 13 May 20 May 28  
June 3 June 11 June 15 June 25 July 2 July 7 July 15 July 23

July 30

Aug 20                

IPM Message August 20, 2010

News on the disease and insect fronts has been quiet. It is getting to be the time to put out bud set fertilizer applications if that is part of your nutrition program.

If you plan to do tissue tests, collect your samples from mid-August through mid-September. You can get your samples analyzed locally or send them off to UMass for analysis. Samples should contain no more than the top 2 inches of growth (no roots, soil, runners, or fruit). Collect tissue from vegetative and flowering uprights. You typically need about 1 cup of vine tissue. Do not collect samples when the vines are wet and do not send the samples in plastic ziploc bags. Always request nitrogen determinations when you submit your samples.

If you are still applying pesticides (e.g., 2nd application of Ridomil or Aliette for Phytophthora), be sure to observe all needed PHIs.  Many products have at least a 30-day PHI.

The IPM Message will now only be updated on an “as needed” basis.  Happy Harvesting!

IPM Message July 30, 2010

We continue to see conditions that support that the season is running about 2 weeks ahead of average (some fruit are blushing this week).  Flea beetle is out and can be controlled with Sevin and Diazinon if numbers are high.  There are reports of southern red mite damage so keep an eye out for that; Nexter can be used for mite control.  Sprays have been going out for cranberry fruitworm control.  Be sure you are counting unhatched viable eggs.  If you need verification about egg status, you can bring the suspect fruit to the entomology lab and they will look at the fruit under the microscope.  More than 90% of the eggs that growers brought in were dead.  Reminder for those delivering to Ocean Spray: No Sevin (carbaryl) applications can be made after August 1.

Even though it is too late for most situations, keep in mind that the total amount of Belay that you can use is 12 oz/season.  So if you use it as a soil application, you will use up the 12 oz limit in the one shot.

There continues to be concern about a third generation of black headed fireworm. We just don’t know how things will work out (ie, will the eggs hatch? Will the larvae be around to cause damage?).  Hatch will depend upon daylength and evening low temperatures.  Scout for injury; if you see any, spray ASAP.

The Station will be celebrating its 100th anniversary at the CCCGA’s summer meeting.  We hope you will all join us on Tuesday August 17 for the clam bake and festivities.  Call the CCCGA at 866-7878 for more information.

IPM Message July 23, 2010

Just a short message this week. Flea beetles are out. Belay, Sevin and Diazinon are good choices to control flea beetle.  The Entomology lab reports that several growers have already put out sprays to control this pest.  There is also some talk and concern about a third generation of blackheaded fireworm showing, so be on the look out on problem or suspect bogs.

The Station will be celebrating its 100th anniversary at the CCCGA’s summer meeting.  We hope you will all join us on Tuesday August 17 for the clam bake and festivities.  Call the CCCGA at 866-7878 for more information.

IPM Message July 15, 2010

From the Entomology Lab: Keep in mind that Belay is only being recommended for
cranberry weevil; it is a better choice than Actara for weevil management. Black-headed
fireworm, cranberry fruitworm and Spag are on the Belay label but will likely only
suppress at the 4 oz rate. Fruitworm are showing up at low levels at many beds and lots
of red berries on some Stevens beds where fruitworm sprays went out too late.
Reminder for those delivering to Ocean Spray: No Sevin (carbaryl) applications can be
made after August 1. Delegate is looking great for cranberry fruitworm control but you
can only apply a total of 19.5 oz/A per season. Black headed fireworm is still showing
up and there have been a few Southern Red Mite reports here and there.
There has been some talk about a combination spray of Callisto, Poast and crop oil that
seems to be controlling poison ivy. Based on the mode of action of Poast, it is only
effective against grasses. Broadleaved plants, like poison ivy, are naturally resistant to
herbicides like Poast because they have do not have the enzyme that is affected by the
herbicide’s active ingredient. So, there is no straightforward reason to believe Poast is
helping here unless one of its inert ingredients is doing something (this is very unlikely).
I suspect it is the high rates of Callisto that are producing the control of the poison ivy.
Keep in mind, to apply the equivalent of the highest label rate of Callisto (8 oz/A), use
just 1.6 tsp per gallon (this assumes an application rate of 30 gallons of water per acre,
which is very reasonable for most ground applicators); 1.6 tsp equivalent to about 0.27
oz. The maximum amount of NIS should be 1.9 tsp (0.32 oz) per gallon or 2.5 TBsp (1.3
oz) crop oil; you can use about 2 oz of Poast per gallon of water to deliver the high-end
rate of a 1.5% solution. If this combination is working and there are no application
issues, then this is good news. Just be sure your recipe keeps to the rates permitted by
the label.

IPM Message July 7, 2010

If you are planning to spray for weevils, you should do so soon. Scout, assess, and treat; don’t
wait. Reports of cranberry fruitworm pressure (in terms of unhatched, viable eggs) has been
variable; some high numbers and some low. Try to use a magnifier when inspecting the calyx
end of the fruit for unhatched viable eggs. The eggs are very difficult to see with your naked eye
and it is easy to make a mistake and this will directly impact your spray decision.
The biggest issue now is the prolonged heat and the stress that it is placing on the vines. Make
sure you keep the vines well watered during this period until the heat breaks. Weather forecasts
indicate these high temperatures could last for at least another week. We should hopefully get out
of the 90’s but high 80’s will continue to predominate.
If you are considering a Callisto application, weigh the benefits vs the risks at this time. Vines
under stress may not metabolize the herbicide as well as normal vines and injury may occur. If
you have a lot of dodder or heavy weed pressure, it may be worth the risk of vine injury to spray
now. If the hot weather persists for a long string of days, you may just need to pick the best
“worst” day and go for it. However, if you don’t have to spray, wait for a break in the weather.

IPM Message July 2, 2010

Belay is a new insecticide that targets summer generation cranberry weevil. You may
apply it twice per season not to exceed 12 oz/A. Belay is very toxic to bees—spray post
bloom! We have heard reports of very high numbers of weevil during the past week (50+
on average). Belay can be used in Zone II and is a viable alternative for weevil control.
Belay can also be used against grubs (please see June newsletter). It is also labeled for
black headed fireworm, Spag, and cranberry fruitworm, though the Entomology lab is
currently NOT recommending its used against these pests. Delegate and Assail are better
choices at this time.
Again, the season continues to be ahead of normal as many growers will have applied
two cranberry fruitworm sprays BEFORE July 4th. Remember to start sampling and
inspecting eggs following the second spray.
Frank has mentioned that Phytophthora is showing up in many beds this year. He
recommends testing vines where the fungus is suspected to verify that the pathogen is
present. If no fungus is present, drainage will be the best approach and you will save
money on fungicides. If the fungus is present, drainage should be improved before the
application of fungicides.

IPM Message June 25, 2010

Many first fruitworm sprays have gone out already and some growers may be through their two sprays before July 4th.  This is certainly way ahead of normal scheduling.  Late varieties on State Bog hit 50% oob late this week.  The second treatment goes out about 10 days after the first application, if you are using the standard fruitworm practice.  As fruits set, begin inspecting 50 randomly picked berries per acre, with a minimum of 200 berries per piece.  Check the guidelines on p. 15 of the Chart Book to determine if another spray is triggered.  Additional sprays are based on the number of unhatched, viable eggs found in the fruit. We have heard a couple reports of high weevil numbers.  Actara and Belay are your summer generation choices.  Both products are highly toxic to bees!!  Belay should be applied post-bloom.

Several growers have asked about spraying Callisto during bloom.  I would argue that spraying during bloom should be minimized whenever possible.  That being said, if you need or want to spray during bloom, you should not expect any issues with Callisto.  Avoid applying on very hot days and strongly consider the potential of the adjuvant to injure petals when making your decision.  You can wait more than 14 days between applications, so if the spray is not pressing, try to wait until bloom is mostly passed.  I have had a report of a combination Poast+Callisto backpack spray that injured new cranberry growth (Stevens).  They used 5 oz Poast, 0.5 oz Callisto, and 1-1.5 oz NIS in a 2.5 gal backpack sprayer.

The last Worker Protection Training workshop for the season will be held at the Cranberry Station on Wed June 30 from 2-4 PM.  Call Marty to reserve a spot (ext 20 or martys@umass.edu ).  The cost is $5 per person.

IPM Message June 15, 2010

Clean Sweep Consulting reported sightings of second generation black-headed fireworm; the larvae are out.  Plan your management based on moth flight and choice of compounds.  Brown spanworm larvae may start to show up soon.  Look for thin, thread-like larvae on the rim of the sweep net.  Check pheromone traps weekly and change lures about every 3-4 weeks as needed.  Several of our new products like Delegate, SpinTor, Belay, and Entrust are highly toxic to bees, so spray these products when bees are not actively foraging.  Toxicity does drop once the spray dries.  Cranberry fruitworm management is based on % out-of-bloom and some varieties have pea-sized fruit out there already.  Try to get 2 estimates BEFORE 50% oob (rather than just 1); it makes your estimate more accurate.  See page 15 of the Chart Book on calculating % oob. 

Remember, only 2 Callisto applications are permitted each season, not to exceed 16 oz/A product for the season.  Many growers will be getting ready for their second fungicide application.  These are applied at 10-14 day intervals; try to stay closer to the 10-day interval if possible.  If you have fairy ring, ferbam applications are made June-July.  This is applied as a soil drench.  Fertilizer applications can be made during bloom.  If using NPK materials, about 25-30% of the total N is put during bloom.  If using a fast/slow combo program, 60% of total N goes out at bloom and if using an NPK/fish program, 30-35% of total N goes out now in the form of NPK.

The last Worker Protection Training workshop for the season will be held at the Cranberry Station on Wed June 30 from 2-4 PM.  Call Marty to reserve a spot (ext 20 or martys@umass.edu ).  The cost is $5 per person.

IPM Message June 11, 2010

Final Keeping Quality Forecast is for GOOD quality.  Frank has calculated that we obtained 7 out of 16 points for this year.  You should probably be able to reduce your fungicide rates and/or the number of applications.  If you use Abound, it does have a 14-day water holding requirement.  Frank has mentioned that he has had conservations with the manufacturer to get this changed, but it is not possible at this time.  Please let Frank know (ext 18 or fcaruso@umass.edu) if you have any injury to flowers associated with applications of chlorothalonil.

There are peas-sized fruit out on the early varieties.  The season continues to be ahead of normal.  Keep this in mind for your cranberry fruitworm management.  Read pages 14-15 in the 2010 Chart Book to re-familiarize yourself with spray program options and timing.  The first CFW is most critical for good management!!  You can consider moving up the first spray especially for large-fruited varieties as the females look for sized fruit to lay eggs in.

The last Worker Protection Training workshop for the season will be held at the Cranberry Station on Wed June 30 from 2-4 PM.  Call Marty to reserve a spot (ext 20 or martys@umass.edu).  The cost is $5 per person.

Last week I did mention injury associated with a Poast/Callisto spray and it seems the damage is most characteristic of the flashing we have seen with Callisto, rather than being a result of combining the 2 herbicides. If you have had a different experience, please let me know, ext 21 or email me hsandler@umass.edu.

If you would like any specific issues or questions to be address on the IPM message, call me at ext 21 or email me hsandler@umass.edu.

IPM Message June 3, 2010

Bees are coming out onto the bogs so exercise caution with all pesticide sprays.  We have had reports of more than 100 BHF moths caught in a trap.  Intrepid is pollinator safe but it is Zone 2 restricted.  Be sure to check the Chart Book to make sure you are waiting the proper intervals between sprays and observing the correct water holding times as needed.  If using Intrepid or Confirm for BHF, apply 2 weeks after the onset of moth flight.  If using these products for Spag, apply 3 weeks after the onset of moth flight.  Timing with conventional insecticides is 10 days after peak for BHF and 10-14 days after peak for Spag.

Some growers have applied their first fungicide spray during this past week.  Frank recommends applying at about 10% bloom.  Walk your bog and take note (by counting) the actual number of open blooms.  It often appears that more bloom are open than actually are. This would cause you to overestimate 10% bloom and you may be applying too early.  The varieties are at very different stages at this point and bogs vary a lot by location, so examine all of your pieces.

We do not recommend mixing Callisto with Bravo.  The manufacturers of Callisto inform me that the sticker in Bravo will impede penetration of the herbicide into the leaf and reduce its effectiveness.  In general, it has been fine to mix Callisto with Poast, but we have had a report of injury associated with this mixture.  Growers have successfully mixed Intrepid and Bravo.  Please let me know what your experiences have been with these or other combinations.

Upright injury following tank-mix backpack application of Callisto and Poast with an NIS (Act 90)
on cv. Randall. Injury is typical of that seen with Callisto alone.

If you would like any specific issues or questions to be addressed on the IPM message, call me at ext 21 or email me hsandler@umass.edu.

IPM Message May 28, 2010

Black-headed fireworm moths have been caught in traps.  We saw our first one on Monday of this week.  When treating the summer generation with Intrepid or Confirm, timing is 2 weeks from the onset of flight, so you must be monitoring now!!  The second spray would follow 10 days later.  If using conventional insecticides, apply 10 days after peak moth flight, which is usually during bloom.  Avaunt and Diazinon are also best management choices.  Cranberry fruitworm moths have also been reported and Spag is out as well.  Be sure to check your traps at least weekly and change the lures and bottoms as needed.

It is likely that early varieties in warm locations will need their first fruit rot fungicide spray early this coming week.  Fungicides should be made based on the Keeping Quality Forecast.  The Preliminary KQF was GOOD (5 out of 10 points).  We may get one or two more points.  In some cases, the number and/or amount of fungicide could be reduced this year, so consider your fruit rot history in this decision process.  Use of Abound and Indar are best when made pre-infection, so include these fungicides earlier in your schedule if you will be using them.  Be careful with your use of these products as resistance development is very real.  Do not use these products more than twice per season.  Chlorothalonil products are Zone 2 restricted; hold water for 3 days.  Water must be held for 14 days after an Abound application.

Some growers have called asking about a quick formula for Callisto mixes.  If you add 1 oz of Callisto to 6 gal of water, that is equivalent to 5 oz/A (in 30 GPA) rate.  If you combine 2 oz of Callisto to 10 gal of water, that is equivalent to 6 oz/A (in 30 GPA) rate.  If you combine 2.5 oz of Callisto to 10 gal of water, that is equivalent to 7.5 oz/A (in 30 GPA) rate.  You would then need 3.2 oz of NIS for every 10 gal (and 1.9 oz NIS for every 6 gallons).  If using COC, use 12.8 oz for every 10 gallons or 7.7 oz for every 6 gallons.

Product                          per 6 gal             per 10 gal           per 10 gal          
Callisto (oz)                     1                         2                        2.5
NIS (oz)                         1.9                      3.2                      3.2      
COC (oz)                        7.7                     12.8                    12.8           
oz/A rate in 30 GPA            5                         6                        7.5

Keep in mind, that in general, you will get better performance from any herbicide when you apply it to plants that are not stressed.  So, it is good policy NOT to apply during hot, dry conditions when plants will be losing a lot of water or experiencing other types of stress.

IPM Message May 20, 2010

The good news is that we have not yet seen any black-headed fireworm moths in our traps yet.  If you have not done so, get your pheromone traps out as soon as you can.  Stevens uprights collected yesterday are at hook.  We could see scattered bloom next week, especially if the warm weather continues.

We have had a few questions about using Callisto and Poast, together or not, and relative timing issues.  It is fine to mix these herbicides together in a tank and spray.  Just remember you cannot chemigate Poast.  So if you do a mixture, you must apply by ground equipment.  If you use both products together, the amount of surfactant (either NIS or COC) does not double.  These products are added based either on a total volume of water rate (0.25% in 30 gallons) or a per acre rate (2 pts/A).  Callisto needs 4 hr to become rainfast.  Others have asked about spraying Callisto for poison ivy.  Some growers have had good luck with this and it seems earlier is better for control.  Also applying by ground equipment or mistblower seems better than chemigating, but these are just general observations and not backed by actual comparisons.  As far as we know, there should be no issue with following a Casoron application with Callisto or vice-versa.  The bigger concern with Casoron at this point is the growth stage and variety of the cranberry vines.  Ben Lear are particularly sensitive to Casoron.

Keep in mind the potential for injury when using surfactants for any pesticide once the flowers are out.

If you would like any specific issues or questions to be address on the IPM message, call me at ext 21 or email me hsandler@umass.edu.

IPM Message May 13, 2010

All insects are out.  Be diligent with your scouting.  Even if you did not see anything last time you were out, go sweep at least once per week.  If you have BHF, you should treat ASAP (see below).  Interestingly, we sprayed Avaunt on Friday and Marty fed larvae on treated uprights that were collected on Monday and the larvae are now dead or dying.  Marty collected BHF larvae off the bog earlier this week and they have pupated already.  The second generation may likely coincide with bloom.  With the warm weather we had in April, the plants AND insects are accelerated and you need to be prepared accordingly.  You may want to get your trap equipment together over the next week or so and be ready to put the pheromone traps a bit earlier than June 1 this year.

For those of you who can use QuinStar, you can use up to 12.5 fl oz/A of the 4L in a single application, not to exceed 16 fl oz/A total with two applications; recommended rate is 8 oz/A.  With the DF, you can use up to 8 oz/A in a single application, not to exceed 10 oz/A total with two applications; recommended rate is 5.3 oz/A.  Include a NIS (non-ionic surfactant) at 0.25% v:v if broadcasting and 2-4 pt/A if chemigating.  A COC can be used at 2 pt/A when chemigating.  Allow at least 30 days between applications; QuinStar has a 60-day PHI.

We have had a couple of questions about mixing pesticides.  Always do a jar test before tank mixing a whole load.  Be careful with DF formulations as they may tend to clump more than liquid formulations.  With Avaunt, the manufacturer has recommended not to add oils, surfactants or ECs prior to DF since they will prevent adequate wetting and dispersion of the dry products.  We have heard of no issues mixing Delegate or Intrepid with Callisto; we have no reports of mixing Avaunt with Callisto.  The other issue has been when to apply amidst all the frost nights and rain.  There is no easy answer here.  Sometimes you have to juggle letting the vines dry out but yet allowing enough dry time for the chemical prior to the next wet event.  This may mean that you might have to spray late morning-early afternoon.

With all the frost events and puddling on the bogs, Frank mentioned that you should be on the lookout for potential Phytophthora problems.  If you think you might have Phytophthora, contact Frank (fcaruso@umass.edu) or ext 18 to get specifics on collecting a sample.

We wanted to highlight pesticides that are restricted for OS growers, that is, no use allowed.  These are simazine (Princep), maneb products (mancozebs are ok), aziniphos-methyl (Guthion and others), quinclorac (QuinStar), fluoxastrobin (Evito), novaluron (Rimon), spiromesifen (Oberon), and carbaryl (Sevin and others).  Do not use these products or your fruit could be rejected!  Growers selling to other handlers should confirm if they have any restricted compounds.

IPM Message May 7, 2010

BHF, weevil, and cutworms are out.  Some pests are coming in over threshold and are needing sprays for management.  If you haven’t already starting scouting, you should get out as soon as possible.  You may want to get your trap equipment together over the next week or so and be ready to put the pheromone traps a bit earlier than June 1 this year.

Some folks had questions about flooding and Casoron use for dodder control.  If you apply Casoron first, you should allow about 3 weeks before putting a flood on the bog.  We have data that shows the herbicide will travel up into the floodwaters if the bogs are flooded soon after application. The other option is to flood first and then apply the Casoron.  Be cautious with Ben Lear as they are susceptible to injury with Casoron.  Be aware of the temperature of the flood water when using it for dodder management.  Warm water is harder on the vines.  Try to pick cool overcast days for the flood.  Be ready to remove the flood if conditions get hot and sunny.

If you are planning to use slow-release spring fertilizer, the application window is upon us.  Inland area early varieties are approaching roughneck and you should be thinking about fertilizing accordingly.

The latest pictures for growth and development are on the web site.  We will continue to post growth stage photos at least once per week.

April 29, 2010

The message has not changed much since last week.  We have heard of a couple of growers who are opting to spray for winter moth.  The string of frost nights this week has hampered herbicide applications for dodder control and other preemergence options.  The growth stage of the vines continues to be very ahead of average.  We continue to find emerged dodder seedlings on bogs this week and the dodder buckets here on State Bog had their first seedling emerge on Monday, April 26.  This is probably about 2 weeks ahead of what we anticipated.

The Entomology lab recommends getting out soon to sweep your bog.  When you have inspected your net, if you are not sure which insect you have, you can drop off samples to the Entomology Lab.

The latest pictures for frost tolerance are available on our home page.  We will continue to post growth stage photos at least once per week.

 

April 22, 2010

The bogs continue to be more advanced than average.  We found emerged dodder seedlings on a bog in Bridgewater yesterday (see photos below).  This is almost 2 weeks ahead of usual, which is early May.  If you are using Casoron as a preemergence control for dodder, you should plan on putting some out very soon.  You may want to consider doing a 25-40 lb/A application within the next week or so and if your bog has history of high infestation, consider a second application 3 weeks later.  Casoron can be tough on Ben Lear so keep that in mind when choosing your rates.  Check your bog for emerged seedlings.  Part the vines and look carefully in the leaf litter for the seedlings.  They can be very small and hard to spot, especially until you develop an eye for them.

If you haven’t been able to get out your preemergence herbicides yet, it may be too late.  Check your bog to see if the weeds are coming up already.  If they are, you have missed your window and will need to do postemergence weed control.

Newly emerged dodder seedling Newly emerged dodder seedling

Click image to enlarge
Newly emerged dodder seedling, probably 1 day old (curled, at tip of finger).

Click image to enlarge
Dodder seedling that is extended, probably 2-4 days old.

The Entomology lab reports continued appearance of winter moth larvae out on the bogs.  You should sweep bogs to see who is out on your bog. We have not heard of folks spraying yet for WM.  Tiny threadlike green spanworm and tiny false armyworm are also out. Cranberry weevil was found on the bog again this week.  Black-headed fireworm larvae may also be out.  If you are not sure which insect you have, you can drop off samples to the Entomology Lab.

We are posting photos of buds that Carolyn has looked at for gauging frost tolerance on our web site’s home page.  We anticipate that new photos will be posted every 3-5 days.

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April 16, 2010

The Entomology lab reports remarkably early emergence of insects this year. Winter moth has hatched and can be seen feeding on blueberry. Winter moth has been found on cranberry this past week at low levels. It would be wise to sweep bogs to check as soon as good weather prevails (next week hopefully). Tiny threadlike green spanworm and tiny false armyworm are also out. Cranberry weevil has even been found on the bog already!  It is likely too early to be spraying for anything except winter moth at this point.  Please see our fact sheet and photos below.  Orthene, Avaunt, Intrepid, and Delegate are good choices for control; Sevin and Diazinon are NOT as spanworms are often resistant to these compounds.

Early instar winter moth larvae False armyworm larva on left and skinny green spanworm larva on right
Early instar winter moth larvae False armyworm larva on left and skinny
green spanworm larva on right

I was remiss last week and in our newsletter to note that the Section 18 permit for the use of QuinStar expires July 31, the same as last year.  We should be getting the labels and paperwork soon (available at the Station and through local Ag suppliers).  EPA had a few additional questions for MDAR but should be releasing the forms soon.  If you have any questions about using QuinStar, please call me at ext. 21 and/or contact your handler.

We are posting photos of buds that Carolyn has looked at for gauging frost tolerance on our web site’s home page.  We anticipate that new photos will be posted every 3-5 days.

The rain and frost nights are making preemergence herbicide applications challenging.  You should make your decision based on how advanced your buds are, along with the weather forecasts.  It is hard because nights that are not frost threats usually have rain, so the bog is wet one way or the other.  Just try to pick the best window and hope for the best.

We will be launching a revision of our web site, hopefully in the next week or so.  We will keep you informed about the newest changes. We hope you will find the new design easier to navigate.

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April 8, 2010

We have a new fact sheet for winter moth available on the web site: Winter Moth Factsheet 2010.  It has some color photographs to help aid in identification and management.  With the warm weather we have been having, larvae could be emerging a bit earlier than the usual mid-late April.  Eggs begin hatching in mid-April.  Researchers at UMass are predicting high numbers of WM based on moth flight.  The newly emerged larvae look like black-headed fireworm larvae; it is very hard to tell them apart at this stage.  There is no defined threshold but as young larvae they can be quite voracious and do a lot of damage.  The Ent lab’s general gut feel at this point is that if you find an average of 10 or more, you should consider treating.  Once winter moth caterpillars become free-feeders, they are easier to control but have likely done most of their damage by that point.  Be prepared to sweep early than usual (early May) and sweep more often, especially if you have had injury in the past.  Orthene, Avaunt, Intrepid, and Delegate are good choices for control; Sevin and Diazinon are NOT as spanworms are often resistant to these compounds.

EPA granted our emergency exemption request for the use of QuinStar for dodder control in mid-March.  Growers can use up to 12.5 fl. oz/A per application of the 4L, not to exceed 16 fl. oz/A per season with a maximum of two applications.  In a similar fashion, growers can apply up to 8 oz/A per application of the Dry Flowable formulation, not to exceed 10.67 oz/A per season with a maximum of two applications.  Irrespective of which formulation you use, up to 2 applications can be made, not to exceed a total of 0.50 lb active ingredient/acre per season. 

Due to residue concerns for product bound to foreign markets, OS is prohibiting the use of QuinStar in 2010.  All growers should verify that their handlers will accept fruit treated with quinclorac PRIOR to treatment.

We have VERY limited data for its efficacy in MA.  Be very selective about which bogs you treat; do not treat large areas of bog.  If you can apply QuinStar (that is, your handler will take treated fruit), applications made earlier in the season (pre to early postemergence of dodder seedlings) seem to be most effective.  Scout for early emerging seedlings on your bogs and time your application based on the appearance of seedlings.  Applications made once dodder has attached to its host are much less effective, and if fruit are present, are more likely to present a residue risk.  A 30-day interval must elapse between applications and QuinStar has a 60-day PHI.

If you have any questions about using QuinStar, please call me at ext. 21 and/or contact your handler.

I have two numbered compounds that may be effective against woody perennials like poison ivy and dewberries.  If you have an area that you would be willing to let me try these compounds, please call me. We would set out the plots this summer and treat them next spring.  Any fruit would need to be removed (which we would do) prior to your harvest since there are no food tolerances for these products.

The CCCGA’s frost service will be activated this Friday April 9 for all eligible members.

 

 

 

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