The University of Massachusetts Amherst
 
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David E. Huber

Professor and Director of the Cognitive Experiments, Models, and Neuroscience Laboratory (CEMNL)

Our research focuses on human perception and memory from a broad-based, computational perspective. To shed light on these basic cognitive processes, we find converging evidence from behavioral studies and neurophysiological measures in combination with neural network and Bayesian modeling. Ongoing research topics include recognition/recall memory, the benefits of retrieval practice, metamemory, letter/word perception, face perception, semantics, shifts of attention, and social cognition.

Learn more at www.psych.umass.edu/people/davidhuber/

Academic Background

  • BA Williams College, Psychology and Physics, 1991
  • PhD Indiana University, Cognitive Science and Cognitive Psychology, 2000
  • Postdoctoral Research University of Colorado, Psychology and Institute of Cognitive Science, 1999-2003
Hopper, W. J., Finklea, K. M., Winkielman, P., & Huber, D. E. (2014). Measuring sexual dimorphism with a race-gender face space. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 40(5), 1779-1788.
Tian, X. & Huber, D. E. (2013). Playing 'duck duck goose' with neurons: Change detection through connectivity reduction. Psychological Science, 24(6), 819-827.
Tomlinson, T. D., Huber, D. E., Rieth, C. A., & Davelaar, E. J. (2009). An interference account of cue-independent forgetting in the no-think paradigm. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 106, 15588-15593.
Huber, D. E., Tian, X., Curran, T., O'Reilly, C, & Woroch, B. (2008). The dynamics of integration and separation: ERP, MEG, and neural network studies of immediate repetition effects. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 34(6), 1389-1416.
Tian, X. & Huber, D. E. (2008). Measures of spatial similarity and response magnitude in MEG and scalp EEG. Brain Topography, 20(3), 131-141.
Huber, D. E. & O'Reilly, R. C. (2003). Persistence and accommodation in short-term priming and other perceptual paradigms: Temporal segregation through synaptic depression. Cognitive Science: A Multidisciplinary Journal, 27, 403-430.
 
Contact Info

Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences
425 Tobin Hall
135 Hicks Way
University of Massachusetts
Amherst, MA 01003

dehuber@psych.umass.edu
(413) 545-1559

www.psych.umass.edu/people/davidhuber/