Video Archive

Puerto Rico Conference: Savage Neoliberalism, Colonialism, and Financial Despotism

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This past June the United States Congress approved the establishment of a Fiscal Oversight Board to take control over all budgetary decisions by the government of Puerto Rico. The Board, known in Spanish as “Junta de Control Fiscal,” consists of seven persons, all appointed by President Obama acting on recommendations by both the Republican and Democratic congressional leadership. President Obama appointed all members, three of whom are Puerto Ricans. The governor of Puerto Rico is an ex-officio member of the Board with voice but no vote. The Governor of Puerto Rico is mandated by the law that creates the Junta to submit all fiscal plans and annual budgets to this seven-members body, which will in turn determine whether these budgets help the island to return to the financial markets. Tellingly, the Congressional bill did not stipulate economic growth as one of its goals. Rather, the explicit objectives seek to make the government more efficient in the provision of public services; to organize the local finances to make possible that bond holders of Puerto Rican debt, contingent on resources available, will be paid; to open doors in the financial markets now closed to the central government and its public corporations, and to foster projects aimed at reducing the island’s dependence on oil for all its energy needs. All of this can be expressed in a different way: Puerto Rico is a colony of the United States confronting an unsustainable pattern of public indebtedness, which led the Federal government to take over. This is a situation in which imperialism, colonialism, and neoliberalism coalesce in a society that has been fraying for a long time and is now moving toward a humanitarian crisis. With a public debt of seventy billion in a country where annual tax revenues are ten billion, an additional forty billion in retirement obligations, and amid a recession for more than a decade, the Puerto Rican model is no longer viable. Per the Congressional logic, supported by local elites, the solution does not lie in democracy but in a suspension of democratic practices as well as in the imposition of the well-known recipe of privatization and higher taxes that ravaged Latin American economies in the 1980s as it is now ravaging the Greek economy. The triad mentioned above of neoliberalism, colonialism, and despotism, and will design public policies that, likely, will deepen the deterioration of the social fabric and create conditions for a radical reformulation of the present colonial relationship with the United States government. The main goals of the event are to educate the Five College community on the important events now taking place on the island and to build bridges with the local Puerto Rican community in Holyoke and Springfield, and regionally.

Unsettling White Ignorance: The Uses of (Auto)Ethnography (Workshop)

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Suzana Maia is a Professor of Anthropology and Gender Studies at the Federal University of Reconcavo da Bahia (UFBR), in Brazil. She is the author of “Transnational Desires: Brazilian Erotic Dancers in New York” (Vanderbilt University Press, 2012), and of several articles on sexuality and transnationalism. She has also done research on women's grassroots quilombola movement in Bahia, looking at the possibilities and limits of feminist alliances between women from different backgrounds. She is currently a Postdoctoral Visiting Researcher in the Department of Comparative Literature at the Graduate Center (CUNY), developing research on whiteness among the middle-classes in Brazil.

Whiteness Among the Brazilian Middle Classes: Moral Discourse, Solipsism, Politics of Resentment

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Suzana Maia is a Professor of Anthropology and Gender Studies at the Federal University of Reconcavo da Bahia (UFBR), in Brazil. She is the author of “Transnational Desires: Brazilian Erotic Dancers in New York” (Vanderbilt University Press, 2012), and of several articles on sexuality and transnationalism. She has also done research on women's grassroots quilombola movement in Bahia, looking at the possibilities and limits of feminist alliances between women from different backgrounds. She is currently a Postdoctoral Visiting Researcher in the Department of Comparative Literature at the Graduate Center (CUNY), developing research on whiteness among the middle-classes in Brazil.

 

A Debate on the Cuban Reform: Transformations, Contradictions and Challenges

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Participants: Agustin Lao-Montes (UMass), Oscar Fernandez (University of Havana), Anamary Maqueira (UMass), and Jorge Quesada (UMass)

 

 

Latin American Cinema: A Comparative History

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Paul Schroeder Rodriguez presents his scholarship on Latin American Cinema History from the silent era to the digital age. Part of the CLACLS Spring 2017 Colloquium Series. Filmed 2/27/17

Asking for Forgiveness Without Repentance: Peruvian State and Afroperuanos

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Luis Martin Valdiviezo is a Professor for the Education Department of the Pontificial Catholic University of Peru.

Embodying Coalitions Across the Worlds of Postcolonial and Decolonial Scholarship and Practice

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Round table panel attempts to answer:

How do post-colonialism and de-colonialism help us think through our current political moment?

How have these two approaches addressed, or failed to address, Islam and the Middle East?

How can they inform our current discussions about immigration?

What methods do post-colonialism and de-colonialism offer for scholarship and activism during this time?

How do they respond to the rise of the global right?

 

Participants:

Lisa Armstrong, Study of Women & Gender-Smith College

Laura Briggs, Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies-UMass

Ellen Correa, Office of Civic Engagement and Service Learning-UMass

Claudia de Lima Costa, Vernacular Language and Literature-UFSC, Brasil

Isabel Espinal, W. E. B. DuBois Library-UMass

Jennifer Hamilton, Legal Studies and Anthropology-Hampshire College

Asha Nadkarni, English-UMass

Banu Subramaniam, Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies-UMass

 

CLACLS Embodying Coalitions Research Working Group Organizers:

Kiran Asher, Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies-UMass

Kimberlee Pérez, Communication-UMass

Kristie Soares, Languages, Literatures, and Cultures-UMass

Fragmented Stories, Fractured Lives...

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Fragmented Stories, Fractured Lives: Forests and Ethno-Territorial Struggles in the Pacific Lowlands of Columbia

Part of the Spring 2017 Research Colloquium Series

Kiran Asher is an Associate Professor grounded in two decades of field-based research in Latin America and South Asia. Her diverse research interests focus on the gendered and raced dimensions of social and environmental change in the global south.

La Peña de UMass: A Creative Space for Community, Self-expression and Resistance 1

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Besides meaning rock, a peña is a creative, diological space where people can express themselves and bear witness through sharing experiences, poetry, stories, ideas. and news that help the effort of resistance. Filmed 2/3/17.

"Capitalism con Salsa: Money and Popular Culture in Pitbull's Miami"

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Kristie Soares, Assistant Professor of Latina/o Literature and Culture discusses how Cuban-American rapper Pitbull accesses capitalism con salsa through his popular catch phrase "dale"—a Spanish language version of carpe diem.

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Center for Latin American, Caribbean and Latino Studies

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UMass Amherst
Amherst, MA 01003-9277

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