Lulu Davies (Ed.D. 2003)

I am currently involved with some research in Sierra Leone, on the privatization of our alma mater, St. Joseph's Secondary School, in Freetown. I am working with Nalinie Kouame, a British-trained lawyer who served as the most recent outgoing president of our USA alumni organization. She and I are both graduates of St. Joseph's.

 

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Karen Campbell-Nelson (Ed.D. 2002)

Karen Campbell-Nelson is a professor in the Faculty of Theology of Artha Wacana Christian University in West Timor, Indonesia. She teaches courses in theological English, gender and theology, and social research methods, and serves on the editorial board of the graduate program’s academic journal, Eureka. Her research focuses on gender, human rights and transitional justice. [2/17]

 

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David Bell (Ed.D. 2001)

David Bell is Associate Professor of International Development and Social Change in the Department of International Development, Community and Environment (IDCE) at Clark University in Worcester, MA. He is also currently IDCE Coordinator of Experiential Learning and IDCE Interim Director. [2/17]

 

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James MacNeil (M.Ed. 2000)

James MacNeil is currently Vice President of the Asia and Special Projects Division at World Education, based in Boston and overseeing education and development programs in Nepal, Indonesia, Cambodia, Thailand, Myanmar and Laos. [Left - in Thailand]

 

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Tossaporn 'Pan' Sariyant ( M.Ed. 1985, Ed.D. 2002)

Pan retired from the Office of Nonformal and Informal Education of the Ministry of Education, Thailand after 37 years of service. She taught part-time at the Chiang Mai University School of Education until October 2016, and is now relaxing and going through old papers, as well as meeting occasionally with her 3 doctoral and 2 master’s advisees from Chiang Mai University.

 

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Michael J. Simsik (Ed.D. 2003)

In July 2017 I began working with a small, independent U.S. government agency (Millennium Challenge Corporation) as the Team Leader for the development of a second compact for Burkina Faso.  Before then I was the Chief of Party on a USAID-funded project - a regional food security project implemented by the International Fertilizer Development Center in Burkina Faso. (12-17)

 

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Michael Marzolla (M.Ed. 1996)

It is hard for me to believe that I have completed twenty-five years with the University of California and that I started my graduate studies at CIE back in 1978,  thirty years ago. I continue to lead the 4-H Youth Development program in Santa Barbara County and four years ago I assumed the leadership of our Counties Master Gardener program.  I have also participated in various international assignments in Bolivia and more recently in Serbia.  In 2006 I was able to visit to Cuba  to study their sustainable agriculture efforts.

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Ann Hartman (M. Ed. 1997)

I continue to work as a Seminars Program Specialist at the East-West Center in Honolulu, where I have been since 2002. My main role is to coordinate short term professional development and exchange programs for younger leaders (aged 25-40) and for journalists from Asia Pacific and the United States. Like CIE, our programs are unique in that they bring participants from countries across the Asia Pacific region and from the United States together for collaborative learning through dialogue, seminar sessions and travel.

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Rita Raboin (M.Ed. 1997)

Rita Raboin is a Sister of Notre Dame de Namur in northern Brazil:

 

I am presently Coordinator for the Pastoral Land Commission, which is a support of the Catholic Church for families who work on small plots of land either in the fields or, in our case, along the rivers. We seek to help the people analyze their situation and see what they can do to remain on the land.

 

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Jimmy Weir (M.Ed. 1998)

After finishing my Masters at CIE I eventually enrolled in  a PhD program in cultural anthropology at the Graduate Center, CUNY.  In 2004, I was based in Kabul to conduct fourteen months of dissertation field research that involved travel to central, northern and western areas of Afghanistan, and the collection over one hundred life story interviews.  During this same period, I organized the Afghan Oral History Project at Kabul University, and directed the American Institute of Afghan Studies.  My dissertation, entitled We Went to the Hills: Four Afghan Life Stories, wa

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