CIE Endowment

Help grow the CIE Endowment Fund

 

CIE Endowment

In 2001 CIE launched a campaign to create an endowment fund to support the activities of the Center.  The fund was started with a kickoff gathering of CIE members and friends in Washington, D.C. in March of 2001. In the intervening years the fund has grown slowly but steadily.  Income from the fund is used to support a Graduate Assistantship for an international student in the International Education degree program associated with CIE. The fund is now large enough to cover the total cost of an assistantship for an academic year.

 

Current Status of the Endowment Fund Drive

As of August, 2016, the Endowment Fund has a value of approximately $525,000. We are very appreciative of the many CIE members and friends who have helped us reach this point. We count on your ongoing support to continue to grow the Endowment to keep up with increasing costs of supporting an international graduate student. International students, particularly those from developing areas do not have the resources required to get a visa without an assistantship.  Each year the assistantship supports a student who brings experience and a unique cultural perspective that enriches the CIE community.

 

Donate online now with a credit card.
This links you directly to the CIE Endowment Fund.
 

Or make check out to University of Massachusetts and send to:

 

Center for International Education
College of Education

University of Massachusetts
Amherst, MA 01003 USA

 

CIE Endowment Fellows

Since its inception ten CIE Endowment Fellows have received support from the fund. Profiles of several recent recipients are below. Learn about past Endowment Fellows.(loads a pdf file)

 

 

Fall 2017

Shamo Thar is a third year Ph.D. student from eastern Tibet in China. Her main research interests are college access and equity issues for ethnic Tibetans under the era of Chinese higher education massification. Prior to coming to UMass, she founded a non-profit organization in western China which raised funds nationally and internationally to initiate education-related programs such as building schools, libraries, and scholarships in rural herding in Tibetan regions.

 

She was also a teacher at Qinghai Normal University in eastern Tibet for a few years and taught development studies there. While being a teacher, she secured funds from the United Board for Asian Higher Universities which she used to create small-scale grants for the students who then implemented various community-driven projects.

 

Shamo earned her Master’s degree at Brandeis University in international development focusing on economics of development. She worked in both non-profit organizations and university settings as manager, program developer, fund-raiser, and teacher in Boston, Washington D.C, Beijing, and Xining. In her spare time, she likes to write picture books for young children in Tibetan language.  She spoke about her goals for her doctoral program:

 

With my Ph.D study, I plan to upgrade my skills in scientific research primarily understanding questions of college access and equity for under-researched groups such as Tibetans in Chinese education systems. After more than ten years of work in promoting quality education for Tibetan girls and youth in western China, my program at CIE/UMass allows me to transition and reflect upon past and look forward to meaningful ways of creating dialogues with larger audiences using data from solid research studies.    

 

Her recent paper titled Tibetan Pastoralists and Schooling: Local Challenges in a Context of Educational Reform has been published as a book chapter in Tibetan Pastoralists and Development through Leipzig University press.

 

 

Fall 2016

Eunice Kua is a first year Master’s student from Malaysia. Formerly an academic librarian, she later trained in literacy and language development and has been facilitating a local language literacy program among Darfur refugees for the past 8 years. Based in eastern Chad, she served as a focal point and provided support to community-based mother tongue literacy initiatives in five refugee camps and 14 primary schools, working with teachers, trainers, supervisors, editors, illustrators and local committees. Her major responsibilities included designing and delivering teacher training workshops, facilitating the development of local language literacy materials, and visiting classes to see how the techniques and materials were being used. She says: 

 

I am really grateful to be able to come to CIE to fill some of the gaps that I identified in my skills and knowledge while working in literacy and education in Chad. It was a joy and privilege to be able to work with the refugees there, learning their culture and language and experiencing the remarkable hospitality, kindness and resilience they show. Through this Master’s program, I hope to become better equipped to help refugees reach their educational goals. I’ve found that the readings and classes at CIE really speak to issues I want to explore and questions I came with. I am excited to find ways to apply the resources, information and conversations that I experience here to our work in Chad and elsewhere.

 

 

Fall 2015

Hafez S. AbuAdwan is a first year Master’s student from Gaza, Palestine. He has worked with local and international NGOs focusing on formal and non-formal education. He worked at the American International School in Gaza (AISG), at the Gaza Training College- UNRWA, and at Loyola University in Chicago as FUBLRIGHT Scholar. Hafez also worked for several years with AMIDEAST mainly on the ACCESS Micro-scholarship program for Palestinian youth. Because Palestinian youth lives completely under the Israeli occupation, they seek their most basic desires to have the right to live, love, and laugh. Hafez also co-founded “Voices from Palestine”; a creative writing group. Since 2008, this group has been active in generating a series of creative Palestinian writers.

 

After several years of experience in the field of education and experiencing several wars, I reached the realization that youth needs to be empowered through Peace Education where they can learn and apply conflict resolution and negotiation methods and tactics. Hence, CIE aligns perfectly with my academic professional interests. Here at CIE, I have ample opportunity to observe and learn from complex mixture of expertise in the field of international development. I will be able to utilize my knowledge to better benefit Palestinian youth. After all, it is all about preparing the leaders of tomorrow.

 

Fall 2014

Surl Hee Kim is a first year Master’s student from South Korea. She worked at the Beautiful Foundation in South Korea which sponsors programs in philanthropy education. The key messages of philanthropy education are that difference is not wrong, empathy is the first step for philanthropy, and philanthropic action can change the world in both small and large ways. These messages were effective in school classrooms, for parents and in non-profit sectors.  Surl Hee also worked coordinating volunteer activities for a vocational school for disadvantaged youth in Vietnam which provided her with an opportunity to learn about such work in another context.

 

Surl Hee comments on her initial reactions to CIE in her own words:

Personally, one of my hopes is reunification between North and South Korea. I’ve been thinking that I need to be prepared for after-reunification in my field. I am glad to have the opportunity to study at CIE.  It is exciting to learn about international education with students from various countries. The participatory atmosphere of the learning community at CIE has already triggered my interests and passion for more in-depth learning.  I am sure that my interest in building a healthy community for children and youth will widen through diverse programs at CIE. 

 

 

Ambassador Cynthia Shepard Perry Endowment

 

A new endowment has been established in honor of our distinguished alumna, Cynthia Shepard Perry, who served as U.S. Ambassador to Sierra Leone and to Burundi, as well as serving as U.S. Executive Director of the African Development Bank. Ambassador Perry received her doctorate with CIE in 1972. Each year the endowment will provide support to an international student or a CIE student who wishes to pursue field work internationally. The fund will give priority to supporting the field work of women students, but all applicants will be carefully considered.

 

 

The fund has been initiated with a generous contribution by a couple who are motivated by the work of CIE and by the impact that Dr. Perry has had in her career and wish to provide opportunities for women students to pursue similar careers. The first award will be made in 2020 or when the fund reaches $25,000.

 

Please consider making a gift to the Ambassador Cynthia Shepard Perry Endowment to ensure that CIE students have funding to support their international field work!