University of Massachusetts Amherst

Anthropology

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Children gathering potatoes on a large farm near Caribou, Maine, in 1940. Schools would close until the potatoes were harvested.

 
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Courses in Heritage & Society
at UMass Amherst

Students who are interested in taking heritage-related courses have a wide variety to choose from. Click here to see what will be offered next semester, click here to jump to the current courses being offered, or click here to see what has been offered in previous semesters.


Upcoming Courses

Summer 2014

Global Heritage & The City: 597GC

Matthew J. Hill
Meets Online, Summer Session II

Currently over 230 inhabited cities around the world are listed as UNESCO World Heritage Sites. In contrast to uninhabited, museum-­‐like heritage sites such as Colonial Williamsburg, the development of World Heritage sites situated in complex, heterogeneous urban spaces presents unique challenges for academics and practitioners. Such sites are arguably more dynamic, cosmopolitan, and involve a broader range of social actors operating at multiple institutional scales than natural or cultural heritage sites. Moreover, the introduction of a range of public and private partnerships in the context of a diverse array of neoliberal projects (characterized by open borders, free trade, and private investment) around the globe has only intensified the variety of urban heritage processes, calling for their theorization and applied engagement.
Registration will be available through Continuing and Professional Education in Spring 2014.

Spring 2014

Landscape and Memory

David Glassberg
Thursdays 1PM-3:30PM

This seminar explores the relationship between historical consciousness and environmental perception, or "sense of history" and "sense of place." Among the topics we will consider are how individuals and groups identify with particular environments; represent those environments in words and pictures; and transform those environments through the creation of monuments and memorials, historic preservation, and heritage tourism. Of particular interest are issues associated with the identification and protection of cultural disciplines, including cultural geography, history, anthropology, and landscape architectures.

Visual Arts & Human Development II: Art 311

Martha Taunton
Tuesdays and Thursdays 1:00PM 2:15PM

Continuation of ART 310. Exploration of art as taught in public schools. Topics include: artistic and aesthetic development, approaches to teaching art history, criticism, and studio, museum education, problem solving and concept development in art, multicultural approaches to the art curriculum and special education in art classrooms. Readings, written assignments, class presentations, and extensive off-campus field experiences. Prerequisite: B.F.A. major or consent of instructor.

Sem-N.Y. Pop: Art 691A

Jerry Kearns
Fridays 12:20PM-2:00PM

Introduction to the professional art system in New York City. Overnight trips. Visits to artist studios and art critics. Meetings with curators at nonprofit, alternative and museum spaces. On Friday nights: performance art, video screenings, art openings, underground films, dance events. Independent work from students' studios discussed in critiques with class and instructor in Amherst.

The Springfield Renaissance: Honors 290D

John Simpson
Wednesdays 12:20PM-1:10PM; Fridays 12:20PM 4:25PM

This course uses the arts as a lens to study various historical sites in downtown Springfield and introduces students to the history of art in Springfield and its impact on the community. (No previous art experience necessary.) The class examines the practical applications of art in relation to history, society, museum and gallery studies, culture and personal expression. Through field trips, guest speakers, written assignments, guided art-making activities in Studio 9, and a final art exhibition at 1350 Gallery, students will gain an overview of the development of Springfield?s identity through art. Field trips include visits to four historic art sites in downtown Springfield, each followed by a two-page written assignment in which students interpret and analyze the experience. There will be a final five-page written assignment based upon art and its impact on society, especially in Springfield. Each of the experiences will also be interpreted though art-making activities in Springfield?s Studio 9. A shuttle to Studio 9 and back to the Haigis Mall will be provided each Friday. By a guided analysis of the artists? ability to change the quality of life in the urban environment, students will develop their own understandings of what art means to them and how they think it contributes to society. Through painting/drawing sessions, guided site visits, guest lectures and a final art reception, students will experience what it takes to make art and the need for its presence in society.

Heritage of Colonialism: ANTHRO 497JA - 01 ST; 697JA

Instructor: Jane Anderson
Thursdays 9:30AM-12:30PM

Lecture meets with Anth 697JA, (Fulfills 300+ Cultural Anth course) This course is offered as a decolonization project. It will consider the mechanics and operation of past colonialisms in order to understand the means through which they have shaped and continue to shape our possibilities for understanding the world and its temporal, spatial and cultural differences. The course will draw heavily from the work of Walter Mignolo, specifically his thesis of "border thinking" which will be used as the disciplinary, geo-cultural and ideological space from which discourses of power and resistance can be elaborated. The aim of the course is to provide some of the initial tools for understanding decolonizing research within disciplines like anthropology.

Current Course Offerings

Fall 2013

Introduction to International Heritage Studies: HERIT 560:

Instructor: Matthew Hill

This seminar focuses on various aspects of public commemorations of tangible and intangible heritage. History and trends of US and international heritage administration will be explored. Open to graduate students; advanced undergraduate students admitted with instructor permission.

Heritage Landscape Management: LANDARCH 663/REGIONPL 663

Instructor: Ethan Carr

This course offers students the opportunity to deepen their understanding of the theory and practice of heritage management generally and specifically in its application to the management, interpretation, and design of culturally significant landscapes, including urban landscapes, parks, gardens, historic sites, and agricultural landscapes all over the world.

Public History: History 659

Instructor: Jon Olsen

An examination of the various public images and uses of history and issues confronted by historians working in museums, historic sites, oral history, historic preservation, archives and documentary film.

Previously Offered Courses

Summer Online Courses 2013

Global Heritage and the City

Instructor: Matthew Hill
Meets online, 6/17-8/2

Currently over 230 inhabited cities around the world are listed as UNESCO World Heritage Sites. In contrast to uninhabited, museum-like heritage sites such as Colonial Williamsburg, the development of World Heritage sites situated in complex, heterogeneous urban spaces presents unique challenges for academics and practitioners. Such sites are arguably more dynamic, cosmopolitan, and involve a broader range of social actors operating at multiple institutional scales than natural or cultural heritage sites. Moreover, the introduction of a range of public and private partnerships in the context of a diverse array of neoliberal projects (characterized by open borders, free trade, and private investment) around the globe has only intensified the variety of urban heritage processes, calling for their theorization and applied engagement.

This online seminar will develop the basic themes, concepts and case studies required to theorize, analyze and practically engage with global, national, regional and local urban heritage sites in comparative perspective. UNESCO’s recently passed Historic Urban Landscape recommendations will form an important backdrop to the course. In addition to providing an introduction to heritage studies, the course will address several important topics, including UNESCO’s Historic Urban Landscape construct, urban heritage tourism, rediscoveries of local forms of modern heritage, grassroots and living forms of heritage, and contested urban heritage and heritage values. In addressing these themes, the course will seek to answer several important questions: What if anything is unique about urban heritage sites? Why are certain forms of urban heritage neglected or overlooked? What are best practices for sustainably developing historic centers and urban heritage landscapes?

To view the syllabus, click here. Register here for the credit or the non-credit options. For credit courses are easily transferable to other schools. Non-credit courses are ideal for career enhancement.

Safeguarding Intangible Heritage

Instructor: Sophia Labadi
Meets online, 7/8-8/16

For career enhancement by heritage professionals, community leaders, non-profit organization staff members, and civil servants as well as higher education students from the social sciences/humanities (anthropology, cultural studies, sociology, public policy…). This course aims to equip participants with an understanding and a working appreciation of both theoretical and operational approaches to the working practices in the field of intangible cultural heritage and to the key issues faced by heritage managers, inter governmental, nongovernmental and community agencies. This course also aims to equip participants with the necessary skills to empower communities and to engage them in the safeguarding of their own heritage. All through this course, the 2003 UNESCO Convention for the safeguarding of the intangible cultural heritage will serve as a reference point.

To view the syllabus, click here. Register here for the credit or the non-credit options. For credit courses are easily transferable to other schools. Non-credit courses are ideal for career enhancement.

Spring 2013

The Literary and Visual Cultures of Catastrophe: English: 891MM

Instructor: Professor James E. Young

In this course, we explore the literary and visual responses to catastrophe in the 20th and very early 21st centuries, making as part of our study the burgeoning theoretical and critical approaches to these works. Specifically, this course will examine the breaches in historiography, literature, art and museum architecture just before and after World War I, before turning to texts of World War II, the Holocaust, Lynchings, and the Atom bomb. We will conclude with a close examination of the issues underlying current efforts to represent and commemorate the attacks of September 11, 2001.

The Culture of Memory: History, Trauma, and National Identity: English: 891CC

Instructor: Professor James E. Young

In this course, we explore the cultural construction of memory--personal, religious, national, social, and literary--from ancient to modern and post-modern times. Here we ask to what extent memory is transmitted through individual selves and to what extent it is socially and culturally produced, where the self and culture overlap. Looking specifically at the ways historical trauma is remembered, we ask who controls the past, to what ends, and how the very notion of collective memory can be politically shaped. Among the "memory-sites" under examination here will be personal and official history, oral testimonies, diaries and memoirs, monuments, museums and days of remembrance, and post-modern forms of "counter-memory" found in contemporary architecture, photography, and conceptual art.

Art in Cross-Cultural Perspective: Anthropology 234

Instructor: Rae Gould

This course introduces students to anthropological approaches to the study of art and explores the intersection of Anthropology and Art (in its many mediums) across cultures, both western and non-western, and across time. The history of the anthropological study of art, as well as historical and contemporary examples of various forms of art, symbolism, identity markers, systems of communication, aesthetic productions, tourism and trade, marketing, concepts of "primitive art" and reification of otherness, will be covered.

Anthropology of Slavery Credits: Anthropology 297PP

Instructor: Whitney Battle-Baptiste

This seminar is an exploratory effort to provide interdisciplinary methods for students engaged in the research and analysis of African American life and history. This course will also address the meaning and significance of how material culture enhances the interpretation of black cultural production and African Diaspora theory. An interdisciplinary perspective will be employed through readings, exercises, lectures and discussions pertaining to historical archaeology, art history, and African American history. While plantation societies will be covered, the course will concentrate on issues related to society, culture, power, and identity formation from the view of the enslaved. We will ultimately consider the role of African Diaspora archaeology in the broader discussion of African American culture and identity.

Indigenous Archaeologies: Anthropology 497EN

Instructor: Sonya Atalay

Day/Time: Thu 9:05-12:05PM How do Indigenous people around the world do archaeology? How do they study and protect their sacred sites and landscapes? Indigenous groups globally are increasingly involved in studying and protecting archaeological places. They are involved in archaeology and cultural tourism and management projects of all sorts. We know of many indigenous groups who have worked on reburial and repatriation research. However, did you know that: The Maori people of New Zealand are using state of the art technology to scan sacred carvings located on spirit trees? The Kashaya Pomo have developed cultural protocols for conducting fieldwork using their tradtional teachings? Aboriginal people in Australia are now the primary tour guides for a rock art site that is several thousand years old? Closer to home, for Anishinabe people in Michigan, nearby rock art images are viewed as a "teacher". Tribal members provide regular cedar baths to nourish the stone that holds over 100 cultural instructions for how to live in balance with creation. These are only a few of the ways indigenous people are engaging with archaeology. In this course we will explore these and many more indigenous archaeology projects from around the globe. These projects set new directions for archaeology in an area of study called "Indigenous Archaeology". We will examine the rise of Indigenous archaeology and explore ways that archaeologists and indigenous peoples are working together to shape a shared future. We will investigate ways that Indigenous peoples' interpret, teach about, and manage archaeological sites and sacred places. We will examine the role of science in this process, and we will discuss the concept of "braiding knowledge" -blending archaeological science with indigenous knowledge to study, learn about, and protect archaeological sites. Most importantly, we will ask: what does all this mean for the future of archaeology round the world? The course will follow a seminar format that involves in-class discussion of readings.

Endangered Languages: Anthropology 497EN

Instructor: Emiliana Cruz
Tuesday/Thursday 9:30-10:45

Among the world's 7000 languages, more than half are poised for extinction in the next century. The course offers an analysis of as well as a humanistic appreciation for linguistic diversity and what it means for humankind; and of contemporary conditions and assumptions that imperil this diversity. We will learn about the work of indigenous language activists and documentary linguists around the world. We will address three major questions: 1) How do languages become extinct? 2) Is language loss forced or is it chosen? 3) Does a culture disappear when a language dies? In addition to reading the assigned material and contributing actively to seminar discussions, students will be responsible for one or more class presentations and a final paper.

Global Heritage and the City: Anthropology 597GC

Instructor: Matthew Hill
Tuesdays 4:30-7:30PM

Currently over 230 inhabited cities around the world are listed as UNESCO World Heritage Sites. Unlike uninhabited and museum-like heritage sites such as Colonial Williamsburg, the development of World Heritage sites situated in complex, hetergenous urban spaces presents unique challenges. This course will examine the variety of experiences and meanings of working and living in places that are signified as World Heritage Sites in order to uncover the ways that cultural heritage articulates with factors such as ethnicity, race, nationalism and migration to reveal new forms of urban globalization. The course will examine the articulation of cities with several exciting new directions in the field of heritage studies including: (post)colonial nostalgia, heritage aesthetics, heritage tourism, branding and commodification, neoliberalism, and sustainable urban development.

SPRING 2012

Conservation of Nature & Culture: History 391N & 691N

Instructor: D. Glassberg
TuTh 9:30-10:45

This course will explore the history of various efforts around the world to conserve nature and culture. Students will learn about the history of the Conservation Movement in North America, but also get a chance to think broadly about what the idea of conservation means in archeology, folklore, historic preservation, and the fine arts, especially in a time of globalization and climate change.

Food & Culture: Anthropology 397FD

Instructor: Krista Harper
TuTh 2:30-3:45 PM

This course surveys how cultural anthropologists have studied the big questions about food and culture. How and why do people restrict what foods are considered "edible" or morally acceptable? How is food processed and prepared, and what does food tell us about other aspects of culture like gender and ethnic identity? How have power issues of gender, class and colonialism shaped people's access to food? How has industrialization changed food, and where are foodways headed in the future? Along the way, students will read and see films about foodways in Europe, Africa, Asia, the United State and Latin America.

Heritage Development & Community Engagement: Anthropology 597CE

Instructors: Whitney Battle-Baptiste and Neil Silberman
Mon 12:20-3:20 PM

This graduate level seminar will explore how community-based archaeological research and inclusive heritage policy can offer powerful tools for contemporary historical reflection, cultural creativity, and social justice, with special focus on Eleuthera, one of the "out islands" of the Bahamas. From a general survey of current historical archaeology and heritage theory, the course will move on to consider the problems and challenges of collaborative archaeological and heritage research at specific sites and within specific social contexts on Eleuthera. Particular themes will include the material culture of colonialism and slavery; the evolution of Caribbean agriculture and economy; the role of oral histories in historical archaeology; race, class, and gender as unspoken components of the Caribbean imaginary; touristic representations of the Caribbean as both deceptive and socially formative; and the role of archaeology and heritage practice in addressing the pressing social, cultural, and economic problems of Eleuthera's contemporary communities. Seminar participants will help shape research questions and methods of community engagement for the ongoing project of the Center for Heritage and Society on Eleuthera.

Improving Group Relations: Psychology 690W

Instructor: Linda Tropp

This course is designed for graduate students to engage in discussion and analysis of social psychological research and theory concerning approaches to reducing prejudice and improving relations between groups, with a special emphasis on relations between members of racial, ethno-political, national, and religious groups. Students will explore how varied strategies may be used to improve group relations, such as experiencing contact with other groups, shifting social norms, encouraging pro-social motives, implementing institutional policies, and supporting efforts toward social change. Special attention will be paid to psychological motivations that underlie the effectiveness of these strategies, and to potential strengths and weaknesses of these approaches depending on the relative statuses and conflict histories of the groups involved.

Politics of Preservation: History 391P

Instructor: Jeffrey Trask
TuTh 4:00PM - 5:15PM

This course will examine the cultural politics that influence reuse of historic spaces for museums and other public purposes. Through course readings, site visits and individual archival research, students will explore sites ranging from historic houses and period rooms presented as museum installations to restored villages and communities to dramatic reuse of historic space for cultural tourism. Examining historical case studies of various interpretations of historic space, students will pay particular attention to the social and political context in which both original use and reuse took place by analyzing primary documents that illustrate both motivations and strategy for interpreting historic space.

Practice & Politics of Cultural Property: Anthropology 397AB

Instructor: Jane Anderson
TuTh 2:30-3:45 PM

What is cultural property? Can culture be owned and if so how? Are all cultures or all claims to culture the same? How do particular groups and/or organizations mobilize a concept of cultural property and for what ends? How are institutions that hold cultural property responding? This course explores the emergence of this concept, its contemporary politics and the multiple legal and policy interventions that inform this srea. A general ananlysis of concepts of culture, property and rights, will be provided and extended by looking at how these are circulated within different local, national, and institutional sites.

Theories & Methods of Oral History: History 497AA

Instructor: Rachel Martin
Tu 4:00PM - 6:30PM

FALL 2011

Heritage as Politics: Anth 597DP

Instructor: Neil Silberman

This graduate level seminar will explore some of the moral dilemmas and conflicting ethical visions in the work of international heritage organizations around the world. Focus will be placed on the rights and responsibilities of organizations such as UNESCO, ICOMOS, ICCROM, IUCN, the World Bank, and the World Monuments Fund to move beyond the physical conservation of income-generating tourist attractions and acknowledge the social impact of heritage themes such as indigeneity, diaspora, ethnicity, gender, nationalism, nostalgia, and virtuality. Course participants will examine current critiques of heritage concepts such as "authenticity," "significance", and "sustainability." They will review case studies of tangible and intangible heritage from the Middle East, Europe, US, and Australia to see how traditional heritage forms such as house museums, "birthplaces," archaeological sites, object collections, memorial plaques, cemeteries, and historic battlefields have taken on new and sometimes unintended meanings in the midst of social change and political upheaval.
In particular, we will examine and analyze the following politically potent themes in international heritage policy:
1. Heritage and Economic Development
2. Heritage and Human Rights
3. Heritage and Cultural Diversity

 

SPRING 2011

Cree Culture, Natural Resources, and Sustainability: NRC 597CC

Thursdays, 6-9 pm
Instructor: Paul K. Barten, Ph.D.

This small, interdisciplinary course combines reading and group discussions, a winter camping trip with a Cree family in northern Quebec (during Spring Recess), and an individual term project to explore (1) traditional and contemporary Cree culture, (2) the local, regional, and international use of natural resources (wood fiber, minerals, hydropower), and (3) fundamental issues of sustainability, stewardship of the environment, and social justice. The term project will be designed collaboratively with the instructor to build upon, integrate, and extend each student’s interests, talents, and skills in relation to the core topics and activities.
This course is designed for self-motivated juniors, seniors, and graduate students with interests in native people and cultures, the conservation and stewardship of natural resources, and the lessons of history as they inform our individual and societal efforts to live more sustainably.
Click here to download a pdf with more information

Landscape Architecture 606: Cultural Landscapes Studio

Instructor: Peter Kumble

This course introduces students to the process of research, planning, design, and management of historically and culturally significant landscapes through selected real-world site projects.  Projects have focused on elements of cultural and ecotourism, historic ethnographic neighborhood re-development, and site scale design to accommodate visitors and residents. Typically, this studio class will have a real client and a real project site, which have been varied in scale, location, and character.  Recently, students have worked on projects in colonial New Salem, Massachusetts, an historic African American early settlement neighborhood in Bridgeport, Connecticut, and post industrial Southbridge, Massachusetts. These communities have a rich histories which reflect critical eras in community settlement typical of New England - some very rural and others industrial.  However, all involved a group of key stakeholders who were thrilled to have this class focus on their community!

Anthro597PP: Introduction to International Heritage Studies

Instructors: Neil Silberman and Jane Anderson

This graduate-level seminar will present the basic themes, concepts, and legal frameworks for the public commemoration of tangible and intangible heritage.  It will cover the historical development of the concept of heritage as well as exploring the genesis of international heritage administration, charters, conventions, and national heritage laws. It will highlight emerging trends and practices including exploring the sociological concept of "social" or "collective" memory and contrast it with the more formalized techniques of heritage didactics and curation.  The seminar will highlight the increasing interest in "bottom-up" heritage programming that directly involves the general public in the formulation, collection, and public presentation of historical themes and subjects as an ongoing social activity.  Case studies from different regions and social contexts will be explored: conflicted heritage, minority heritage, indigenous heritage, diasporic heritage, sites of conscience, long-term community planning and involvement in eco-museums and public heritage interpretation centers. Students will be asked to address specific problems in sites or organizations presented during the course and will formulate socio-interpretive assessments of projects or research of their choosing in the U.S. or abroad. (Open to advanced undergraduates with permission from instructors.)

Honors 392L: Visions and Revisions: Literary Non-fiction in Social History

M/W/F, 11:15-12:05
Instructor: Kathleen A. Brown-Pérez, Commonwealth Honors College

Have you ever wondered which stories about Colonial America didn't make the history book cut? Why were stories about Betsy Ross and Paul Revere's ride repeated ad nauseum to the exclusion of more accurate and interesting stories? What about the people living in Colonial America? How did such a diverse group of people come together to become a melting pot of "Americans"? Or is it a garden salad, with clearly distinguishable ingredients that happen to occupy the same bowl? The use of journal articles and literary nonfiction (instead of traditional history textbooks) will allow students to examine the social, cultural, and political interplay and overlap between American Indians, Africans/African-Americans, and colonists from Europe or of European descent in order to provide a more accurate (and interesting!) picture of life in colonial America. These people lived next door to each other and interacted on a daily basis. They knew each other. Literary nonfiction and journal articles will be used to take an in-depth look at topics that include missionary efforts, slavery, women's rights, diplomacy, war, commerce, cultural interchange, communications, epidemics, economics, social and sexual mingling, and work.

History 541: Using Oral Testimony

Instructor: Margaret Shea

For historians, the narrated story is just the beginning. Oral testimonies, whether collected through oral history interviews, public testimony proceedings, storytelling gatherings or other methods, are rich and complicated sources. In this course, we will utilize theoretical readings and case studies to examine the ethical, intellectual and procedural issues we face when working with oral sources. We will examine ways to combine them with other research methods to maximize their potential as both contributors to and complicators of the historical record. Students will undertake a research project using oral testimony that they have either generated through interviews or obtained through other venues.

Comparative Literature 382: Cinema and Psyche

Instructor: Catherine Portuges

An exploration of contemporary fiction, documentary and experimental filmmaking as a transnational, global phenomenon, with a focus on borders--internal and external; generational, national, and collective memory; family, gender, exile and displacement; migration and identity; and the interconnections between the psychological and cultural dimensions of cinema as a multimedia art form. The course considers the formal, stylistic and esthetic qualities of the moving image; intersections of national, institutional, cultural and social identity, and questions of representation across genres. Readings include critical and theoretical essays, interviews, and formal and methodological approaches to film language. Screenings will be linked to the theme of the Massachusetts Multicultural Film Festival for spring 2011.

History 662: Museum and Historic Site Interpretation

Instructor: David Glassberg

Students in this course will use their research and writing skills to develop projects for area museums and historic sites. In the first part of the semester, students will explore the particular issues involved in the interpretation of objects, buildings, and landscapes in museum and historic site settings. During the remainder of the semester, students will devote their energies to field projects undertaken in teams for local institutions. By the end of the semester, students will be familiar with the literature of museum and historic site interpretation and will have developed some hands-on skills in exhibition design and planning, as well as other tools to increase public understanding of historical issues through the interpretation of objects, buildings and landscapes.

History 693B: Digital History

Instructor: Jon Olsen

This course on digital history examines both the theoretical and practical impact of new media and technology on history, especially in the field of Public History. We will examine how digital media has influenced (and is still influencing) how we research, write, present and teach history. We will draw on theoretical readings as well as analyze the potential benefits and drawbacks of online resources, such as websites, wikis, and podcasts. A major component of the course will be a semester-long project that will require each student to develop a proposal for a digital historical resource and construct a home page for it. The semester project is an opportunity to experiment with new technologies and to overcome any anxieties students might have regarding the use of new media.

FALL 2010

Honors 499C: Historic and Contemporary Issues of American Indians and Tribes: History, Policy, and Law

Instructor: Kathleen A. Brown-Pérez, Commonwealth Honors College
M/W/F, 11:15-12:05

This course begins with a look at American Indians from the time they first discovered Europeans. It continues with a detailed consideration of the history of federal Indian policy in the U.S. and its impact on tribes and individual Indians. Federal Indian policy is continually evolving and generally represents contemporary attitudes toward Indians as well as the political agendas of those in office and on the Supreme Court. In reviewing the policies, their effects on individual tribes will be examined, with a focus on how the effects differ from tribe to tribe, because the tribes, approximately 700 of them, are diverse, each with its own history, culture, government, beliefs, and ideals. In addition to historic and contemporary Indian policy, numerous other topics will be covered, including gaming, Indian environmental rights, and federal acknowledgment. During spring semester, students will continue work on individual papers. Students who register for Honors 499C in the fall are expected to take the 4-credit continuation course in the spring (Honors 499D). Honors 499D is open only to those who took Honors 499C. Permission of instructor required.

Anthropology 597PR: The Politics and Practices of Cultural Property

Instructor: Jane Anderson
Room: Tuesdays, 1:00 - 4:00 in Machmer E25

What is cultural property? Can culture be owned and if so how? Are all cultures or all claims to culture the same? How do particular groups and/or organizations mobilize a concept of cultural property and for what ends? How are institutions that hold cultural property responding? As debates and contests over cultural property increase, this course explores the emergence of this concept, its contemporary politics and the multiple legal and policy interventions that inform this area. A general analysis of concepts of culture, property and rights will be provided and extended by looking at how these are circulated within different local, national and institutional sites.

French Studies 350/Comparative Literature 350: French Film

Instructors: C. Portuges & K. Lachman

This General Education course is taught entirely in English, and all films have English subtitles. Students will experience a wide range of French films, from classics of the Nouvelle Vague to more contemporary, transnational works. Throughout the semester, we will explore debates about French identity /in light of the challenges posed by immigration (especially non-European immigration), economic and cultural globalization, and France's version of "multiculturalism," casting a wide net over cinema to examine the privileged relationship between a nation, an art, and a social practice.

History 659: Public History

Instructor: David Glassberg
Fall 2010, Tuesday 2:30-5:00 pm

Public History is history that is seen, heard, read and interpreted by a popular audience. Public historians expand on the methods of academic history by emphasizing non-traditional evidence and presentation formats, reframing questions, and in the process creating a distinctive historical practice. . . . Public history is also history that belongs to the public. By emphasizing the public context of scholarship, public history trains historians to transform their research to reach audiences outside the academy. History 659 introduces students to the A distinctive historical practice of Public History. The first few weeks of the course will examine the various public images and uses of history, past and present. Topics include how versions of the past are created, institutionalized and disseminated as the public history in civic celebrations, memorials and monuments; in popular culture, including television and film; and in the landscape. We will also consider the relationship of these public histories to more private versions of the past communicated among family and friends (the relationship between public history and collective memory). The remainder of the course will examine some of the particular issues confronted by historians who work in public history settings such as museums and historic sites, historic preservation agencies, archives, history‑related web sites and documentary film. Note: This course is required for those seeking an MA with a concentration in public history; it is highly recommended for others interested in the place of history in modern American culture.

History 397Z ST: Introduction to Public History

Instructor: M. Miller
TuTh 11:15 AM – 12:30 PM

What is Public history? Public historians-whether they work in museums, archives, historic sites, federal agencies or any one of a number of other possibilities-aim to take the insights of the discipline as they are cultivated in traditional academic arenas and methods and apply them in a wide range of public settings. Public historians are accomplished social, cultural and political historians who are often conversant in related humanities fields; they are also diplomats, fundraisers, managers and mediators. This course will introduce students to the theory and practice of public history. Students will learn not only where and how historians work beyond the conventional classroom, but the many ways history operates in American public life.

History 595D American Material Culture

Instructor: M. Miller
Tu 2:30 PM – 5:00 PM

Objects tell stories. Just as letters and diaries help us understand how people thought and lived in the past, so too do the things that people made and used: the chairs they sat in, the clothes they wore, and the houses they lived in. This course introduces students to the use of objects as sources of historical insight -- that is, the study of material culture. You will read scholarship that harnesses artifacts as sources, and learn the basics of artifact study so that you can consider using objects in your future research and writing. Classes will explore subjects like the architectural history of New England, American decorative arts and household goods from the 1690s to the present, the material culture of childhood, the material culture of belief, and the study of African American history through the art factual record. NOTE: the course will rely on both guided and self-guided field trips, and will involve the completion of a research project.

History 693J: Comparative Memory: Remembering the Second World War

Instructor: Jon Olsen
Th 4:00PM - 6:30PM

The phenomenon of cultures of memory has emerged over the past decade as a subject of serious historical scholarship.  The aim of this seminar is to discuss the problem of national memory cultures since the Second World War. We will begin the semester by looking at theories of memory and national identity since 1945. Although the primary thrust of our readings will deal with remembering the Second World War, we will also delve into other areas of remembering. The German concept of Vergangenheitsbewähltigung, or coming to terms with the past, and its relationship to national identity will serve as our guiding analytical tool for our investigation into this topic. We will look at a variety of nation-states in Europe as well as the United States and Japan in order to compare and contrast national forms of memory culture and ponder questions of universality versus distinct historical experience.  We will also concentrate on the political and cultural aspects that different national forms of remembering have had on the historical development of these nations.


Anthropology EU 597-01. Topics in the Anthropology of Europe: Heritage and Memory

Instructor: Oriol Pi-Sunyer
Thursday 9:15-12:15, Machmer E-25.

This seminar is designed as an introduction to the interrelated issues of collective (or social) memory and heritage. Although Europe is the primary focus of the course, the phenomenon is global in scope and we shall also examine examples from other areas. This approach will allow us to analyze and compare the scope, nature, and sociopolitical significance of contemporary debates and policies. In many instances, what drives public policies and concerns has much to do with how the past is conceptualized, commemorated and memorialized. Often, these questions have a strong influence such critical civic and political matters as urban planning and immigration legislation. For Europe in particular, this past is embedded in the experience of two world wars and many smaller conflicts, the fall of communism, and horrific episodes of ethnic cleansing both in the 20th century (the Holocaust being the paradigmatic case) and in earlier historical periods. The most significant of these collective memories derive their power from a claim to express a permanent truth, but are not immutably fixed. They are reinscribed in new contexts by new generations, and in the process their meanings are revised and transformed. "Heritage," whose current usage dates from the Enlightenment, is one way of grounding the past (and not only the recent past), and commemorating events and epochs. There are also economic factors to consider. Contemporary societies, in Europe and elsewhere, compete in fostering the value of the past for the present, often as specific sites and destinations. As such, heritage and tourism are collaborative industries, which is not to deny that heritage has significant national and ethnic dimensions. As with memory, heritage is not immutable but tends to reflect changing social and political agendas. There will be much to discuss. How can there be "collective memory"? What is, or should be, the role of pain and emotion in the public sphere? Who owns culture? Who should interpret heritage? Why has the presence of the past become so very important in so many different countries and contexts?


Anthropology 597CW: The Heritage of the Cold War (1945-1969):
Consuming and Commodifying the Past

Instructor: Neil Silberman
One Session Weekly – 3 hours – 3 credits

This graduate/advanced undergraduate course has two interlinked objectives for the ongoing reevaluation of the role of cultural heritage in contemporary society:  1.)  The course will begin by tracing the evolution of heritage practices (policies, laws, conceptions of "significance," and interpretive trends) against the background of the post-World War II geopolitics and ideologies.  It will stress the development of museology and heritage practices in the US, Western Europe, and the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe and will examine how these professional developments—and the impact they had on museums and heritage sites served to further or impede dominant ideologies such as capitalism, industrialization, democratization, and technological innovation.  Selected examples of historic monuments and historic sites in the core areas will be closely analyzed.  2.)  The second half of the course will be devoted to the identification of relevant heritage resources directly related to the Cold War Period and will address the importance of dealing with this relatively recent era as heritage—that is, as material and intangible culture that has served to shape geo-political and national perceptions in the years since 1989.  Using current heritage theory, the course will focus on the heritage of World's Fairs, Automobile Culture, Rock ‘n' Roll, Space Exploration, Civil Rights, Socialist-Realist Art, and European Late Modernism to delineate a body of significant heritage resources that characterize the period of East-West rivalry.  Assignments will include weekly papers and a final project.  Advanced undergraduates may enroll, with prior permission of the instructor.


SPRING 2010

Psychology 690W – Improving Group Relations

Instructor: Linda Tropp

This course is designed for graduate students to engage in discussion and analysis of social psychological research and theory concerning approaches to reducing prejudice and improving relations between groups, with a special emphasis on relations between members of racial, ethno-political, national, and religious groups. Students will explore how varied strategies may be used to improve group relations, such as experiencing contact with other groups, shifting social norms, encouraging pro-social motives, implementing institutional policies, and supporting efforts toward social change. Special attention will be paid to psychological motivations that underlie the effectiveness of these strategies, and to potential strengths and weaknesses of these approaches depending on the relative statuses and conflict histories of the groups involved.

PUBPH 796: Analyzing Narrative Data from the Circumpolar North

Instructor: Lisa Wexler

The course is designed as a graduate seminar that will introduce students to the main theories in the area of indigenous youth resilience, and involve them in using these to analyze interviews done with Alaska Native young people. The project is part of a larger, on-going research project involving indigenous people from Alaska, Canada, Norway and Siberia. The course will be based hands- on learning.

History 697U/797U: Landscape and Memory

Instructor: David Glassberg
Thursday 1:00PM 3:30PM

This seminar explores the relationship between historical consciousness and environmental perception, or "sense of history" and "sense of place." Among the topics we will consider are how individuals and groups identify with particular environments; represent those environments in words and pictures; and transform those environments through the creation of monuments and memorials, historic preservation, and heritage tourism. Of particular interest are issues associated with the identification and protection of cultural disciplines, including cultural geography, history, anthropology, and landscape architectures. Course Notes


Anthropology 597AF: Heritage Narratives: Literary Genres and Contemporary Significance

Instructor: Neil Silberman
Thursdays 10-1, Machmer E-12

This graduate-level seminar will analyze the basic narrative forms and plotlines that underlie contemporary public heritage presentation in print, in video, on websites, and in various forms of on-site presentation. Drawing its theoretical insights from narratology and literary criticism, the seminar will offer a basic understanding of the interpretive significance of heritage "stories" as moralizing metaphorical narratives with profound contemporary reso-nance. Weekly examples of outstanding, noteworthy, or particularly influential heritage narratives will be presented and will be examined by the seminar participants. The final project will be the creation of an original heritage narrative on a selected site or theme of the individual participant's choice. Advanced undergraduate participation will be allowed with the permission of the instructor.


Anthropology 297F: Anthropology of Food

Instructor: Krista Harper
Wed 6:00‐ 9:00 PM 

This course surveys how cultural anthropologists have studied the big questions about food and culture. How and why do people restrict what foods are considered "edible" or morally acceptable? How is ood processed and prepared, and what does food tell us about other aspects of culture like gender and ethnic identity? How have power issues shaped people's access to food? How has industrialization changed food, and where are foodways headed in the future? Along the way, students will read and see films about foodways in Europe, Asia, the United States, and latin America.


Honors 392X: Visions & Revisions

Instructor: Kathleen Brown-Perez
M W F 10:10AM 11:00AM

This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to American Indians and tribes. The class begins with a discussion of the definitions of Indian, Indian tribe, Indian country, and Indian title, knowledge of which is necessary to understand the current status of Indians and tribes in the United States. The second part of the class explores American Indian cultures, including education, identity, music, and women's roles while also addressing controversial issues such as portrayals in the media and stereotyping. The third part of the class provides an introduction to federal Indian law and policy, which defines and regulates American Indians and tribes in the U.S. We will look at environmental regulations and concerns in Indian Country, fishing and hunting rights, and tribal governments. The class will conclude with a look at contemporary issues and concerns faced by American Indians and tribes today, including health & diet, education, and tribal economic development such as gaming. This course is appropriate for students of all majors and backgrounds and fulfils a requirement of the Five College and UMass Native American Indian Studies Certificate Programs.


More Courses in Native American Indian Studies

http://www.umass.edu/nativestudies/current.html


FALL 2009

Anthropology 597AE: Heritage as Applied Anthropology: New Approaches to Public Commemoration and Social Memory

Instructors: Elizabeth Chilton & Neil Silberman
Thurs 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

This seminar will examine the new theoretical trends and tools that have begun to transform the nature of heritage policy and practice in the United States and throughout the world. In contrast to more traditional modes of historic preservation and public commemoration, often embodied in univocal narratives and the sanctification of conserved material authenticity, recent developments have placed stress on community participation in debates on significance and in the dynamic interplay between tangible and intangible heritage. Participants in this seminar will analyze the relevance and contributions of archaeology, cultural, linguistic, and physical anthropology to this reformulation of "heritage" as contemporary social practice. Real-world case studies in urban settings and in the developing world (highlighting the issues of heritage economics, ethics, and cultural inclusiveness) will be selected for special focus, with the goal of applying the insights of anthropology to their further theoretical and practical development.

Anthropology 775/PubP&A 697V: Qualitative Research Methods

Instructor: Krista Harper
Wed 12:20PM - 2:50PM, 620 Thompson Hall

Qualitative research methods, including ethnography, provide an essential component in the policy research "toolkit." Today's policymakers operate in complex societies and serve an increasingly diverse public. Ethnographic research helps policymakers reach the public by providing tools for understanding diverse cultural perceptions, practices, and social problems in context. The centerpiece of the course is an actual ethnographic project here in western Mass: students will design a qualitative research project, conduct field research with a local organization or other community setting, analyze qualitative data, and write up research findings in a paper that explores applications for policy or administration. Students will learn key concepts, research design, methodological strategies, and the ethics of applied qualitative research. In past years, students have conducted heritage-related research projects on the preservation of historic farm buildings, New England archaeologists' views on the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), and the senses of place and belonging developed by immigrant gardeners growing food in an urban community garden.

History 397Z Introduction to Public History

Instructor: Margo Shea
Tues/Thurs 9:30 - 10:45 AM

What is Public history? Public historians-whether they work in museums, archives, historic sites, federal agencies or any one of a number of other possibilities-aim to take the insights of the discipline as they are cultivated in traditional academic arenas and methods and apply them in a wide range of public settings. Public historians are accomplished social, cultural and political historians who are often conversant in related humanities fields; they are also diplomats, fundraisers, managers and mediators. This course will introduce students to the theory and practice of public history. Students will learn not only where and how historians work beyond the conventional classroom, but the many ways history operates in American public life.

History 659: Public History

Instructor: Jon Olsen
Tues 2:30 - 5:00 PM

Public History is history that is seen, heard, read and interpreted by a popular audience. Public historians expand on the methods of academic history by emphasizing non-traditional evidence and presentation formats, reframing questions, and in the process creating a distinctive historical practice.... Public history is also history that belongs to the public. By emphasizing the public context of scholarship, public history trains historians to transform their research to reach audiences outside the academy. History 659 introduces students to the distinctive historical practice of Public History. The first few weeks of the course will examine the various public images and uses of history, past and present. Topics include how versions of the past are created, institutionalized and disseminated as the public history in civic celebrations, memorials and monuments; in popular culture, including television and film; and in the landscape. We will also consider the relationship of these public histories to more private versions of the past communicated among family and friends (the relationship between public history and collective memory). The remainder of the course will examine some of the particular issues confronted by historians who work in public history settings such as museums and historic sites, historic preservation agencies, archives, history‑related web sites and documentary film. Note: This course is required for those seeking an MA with a concentration in public history; it is highly recommended for others interested in the place of history in modern American culture.

Honors 499C: Historic and Contemporary Issues of American Indians and Tribes: History, Policy, and Law

Instructor: Kathleen Brown-Pérez

Indian casinos, teepees, Wounded Knee, Navajo Code Talkers. What do you think of when you hear the term "American Indian"? What happened to Indians in the past and what is happening today? Knowledge of federal Indian policy and law as well as American Indian history through the years is essential to understanding what is happening to Indians and tribes today, why it's happening, and how it could change. This course will begin with a look at American Indians from the time they first discovered Europeans. We will continue with a detailed consideration of the history of federal Indian policy in the U.S. and its impact on tribes and individual Indians. Federal Indian policy (which for many years had the official focus of dealing with the "Indian problem") is continually evolving and generally represents contemporary attitudes toward Indians as well as the political agendas of those in office and on the Supreme Court. It is also a good example of definitional, structural, and culture violence perpetrated against a people who, in many cases, don't get to define who they are or control what is happening to them. In reviewing the policies, their effects on individual tribes will be examined, with a focus on how the effects differed from tribe to tribe, because the tribes, approximately 700 of them, are diverse, each with its own history, culture, government, beliefs, and ideals. In addition to historical and contemporary Indian policy, numerous other topics will be covered, including gaming, Indian environmental rights, and federal acknowledgment. We will then cross the southern U.S. border into México for a look at the Indians who ended up on that side of the fence. Cultural, political, and legal differences south of the border will be viewed in light of the North American Free Trade Agreement and post-9/11 security measures. This is the first part of a two-semester sequence that fulfills the Capstone Experience requirement of Commonwealth College.

pstone Experience requirement of Commonwealth College.

 
UMass Amherst Center for Heritage & Society Gordon Hall Amherst, MA 01003 USA phone: +1 413-577-1605 fax +1 413-545-9494