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Asian Languages and Literatures, Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures

Courses

Undergraduate Courses: Asian Studies / Chinese / Japanese

*We offer beginning and intermediate level Korean Language courses as well. Find out the descriptions and schedule of Korean courses. When using SPIRE, please select "Asian Studies" as a Course Subject, in order to look up Korean courses.

Chinese

CHINESE 110           NON-INTENSIVE ELEMENTARY CHINESE I

This is a beginning course of modern Mandarin Chinese for students with no prior exposure to the language. The content of this course includes: 1) An introduction to the Romanization phonetic system of Chinese (Pinyin); 2) Essential sentence structures and basic vocabulary in the area of greeting, self-introduction, family, hobbies and visiting friends; 3) Approximately 180 characters in simplified form. The major goal of this course in to help students develop the basic skill in listening, speaking, reading and writing.

Equivalent to the first half of Chinese 126 in content. No prerequisites. 3 credits.  *Offered in Spring only.

CHINESE 120           NON-INTENSIVE ELEMENTARY CHINESE II

This is a continuation of Chinese 110. The content of this course includes: 1) Essential sentence structures and basic vocabulary in the area of school life, language learning, making an appointment and shopping. 2) Approximately 120 characters in simplified form. The major goal of this course is to help students further develop proficiency in four skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing.

Equivalent to the second half of Chinese 126 in content. Prerequisite: Chinese 110 (Non-Intensive Elementary Chinese I) or the equivalent. 3credits. *Offered in Fall only.

CHINESE 126           INTENSIVE ELEMENTARY CHINESE I

This is a beginning intensive course on modern Mandarin Chinese for students with no prior exposure to the language. The content of this course includes: 1) An introduction to the Romanization phonetic system of Chinese (Pinyin); 2) Approximately 300 Basic Chinese characters in simplified form; 3) Essential grammar and sentence structures; 5) Basic vocabulary and conversations in both formal and informal settings and 4) Various aspects of Chinese culture, lifestyle and social-cultural conventions. The major goal of this course is to focus on students’ overall development of communicative competence in listening, speaking, reading and writing.

No prerequisites. 6 credits.  *Offered in Fall only.

CHINESE 127           INTENSIVE ELEMENTARY CHINESE I: READING & WRITING

This is a parallel course to Chinese 126 designed for students with significant Chinese background in listening and speaking. The goal is to lay a good foundation in Chinese for further study and to strive for a well-rounded development of communicative skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Mandarin Chinese. It provides basic training on pronunciation and tones, character recognition and production skills, syntactic structures and usage, and high-frequency vocabulary. Skills in reading and writing are emphasized

*Offered in fall semester only.  6 credits.

CHINESE 136           INTRODUCTION TO CHINESE CINEMA

This class presents an introduction to Chinese cinema from its birth in 1905 up to the present. It focuses on the close-reading and appreciation of representative Chinese films. Arranged chronologically and thematically, this course examines interaction of film texts with social contexts. In-depth analyses of films from Mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan leads students to consider theoretical questions such as film aesthetics, production, distribution, and reception. Topics include relationships of cinema and mass culture, history, ideology, colonialism, and globalization.

CHINESE 138           Religion in Chinese Culture (General Education G and I)

In this course we will explore the profound and important religious traditions of China – the Three Teachings of Confucianism, Taoism and Buddhism – and their relationships to Chinese civilization and culture. You will meet Confucian sages, Chan/Zen Buddhist monks, and Taoist hermits and magicians as we study some of the world’s greatest meditations on the nature of both the Divine and the human. Along the way we will experience many of the riches of Chinese art and literature as we seek to understand their significance as religious expressions. Readings will be in English translation. 

CHINESE 140           CHINESE SCRIPT I

You can learn to write Chinese characters with no previous exposure on your part to the study of Chinese language. This course introduces historical and contemporary variations of the unique Chinese writing system. Analyzes the structure of Chinese characters from an historical perspective. Develops ability to recognize Chinese characters in a variety of non-printed forms. Emphasis is on hands-on experience. Lecture with slides and demonstrations. Requirements include participation in class discussion, quizzes, short essays and a term project. No prerequisites. Knowledge of Chinese characters would be helpful but is not necessary.

CHINESE 141           CHINESE SCRIPT II

Continues technic learned in 140, but it can stand alone.

CHINESE 150           PEOPLES AND LANGUAGES OF CHINA

Social and cultural diversity in Chins through the elns of language.  Three foci: classification of the minorities and their languages, language language contact and the formation of Chinese dialects, and the role of language in identifyling in identity ethnic groups and in maintaining distinct cultures. Conducted in English. No prerequisites and no knowledge of Chinese is required.

CHINESE 155           CHINESE MYTHS & LEGENDS

Introduction to myths and legends of traditional China: gods, goddesses, immortals, dragons, and deified heroes. Their ancient forms and how they appear in literature and the arts will be discussed. Short essays, a long essay, a term paper are required. Course is conducted in English; no other language is required. This is a General Education AL/G course.

CHINESE 197Q        Late Imperial Chinese Literature and Culture

This course is an introduction to the Qing dynasty (1644-1911) through various genres of literature, including the novel, classical short story, bannermen tale (zidishu), and poetry, with an emphasis on the cultural interaction that took place between the Manchu and Han peoples.  3 credits.

CHINESE 197S         CHINA IN WORLD AFFAIRS     

This course starts with a question: Why does China behave as it does in international affairs? Why are there problems in Tibet and Xinjiang? Will the Chinese Navy continue to experience clashes with other countries in the East and South China Seas? Are there Asian values that differ fundamentally from Western values? Can China re­balance its economy? We will explore these and many more questions by way of an interdisciplinary approach to Chinese civilization from its beginnings to the present. The course will be conducted in English; no prior knowledge of Chinese will be required.

CHINESE 241           CONTEMPORARY CHINESE LITERATURE

The development of modern China as seen through its literature covering the period 1915-1989. Exploration of the relationship between writing and political change, the role of dissident writers, and the politics of gender in texts from mainland China and Taiwan. All readings are in English translation. This is a GenEd AL/G course. 3 credits

CHINESE 242           CHINESE VERNACULAR LITERATURE

This course surveys the nature and development of traditional Chinese literature written in the vernacular over a period of more than 1,000 years from the Tang through Qing dynasties. Students read selections in English translation from major works and become familiar with genres, such as ballads, transformation texts (bianwen), vernacular short stories, novels, and bannermen tales (zidishu).

CHINESE 246           INTENSIVE ELEMENTARY CHINESE II

This is a continuation of Chinese 120 or 126. The content of this course includes: 1) training in pronunciation and tones, accuracy and fluency in speaking; 2) Approximately 350 Chinese character in simplified form; 3) Essential grammar and sentence structures; 4) Basic vocabulary and conversations in both formal and informal settings, and 5) Various aspects of Chinese culture, lifestyle and social-cultural conventions. The major goal of this course is to further develop students’ communicative competence in listening, speaking, reading and writing.

Prerequisite: Chinese 120/126.  6 credits.  *Offered in Spring only.

CHINESE 247  INTENSIVE ELEMENTARY CHINESE II: READING & WRITING (6 Credits)

This is a continuation of Chinese 127 designed for students with significant Chinese background in listening and speaking. This course provides advanced-beginning students with Mandarin Chinese language skills training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Reading and writing will be emphasized. Students will learn both Chinese language culture through content-based teaching materials and task-oriented activities. By the end of the semester, students will be able to comprehend and engage in basic conversations, to read simple authentic materials, and to write sentences and paragraphs.  6 credits.

Prerequisite: Chinese 126/127/120 or instructor’s permission. * Offered in spring semester only.

CHINESE 285           THATCHER LANGUAGE HOUSE        

The Thatcher Chinese Language House offers the opportunity to live in a residence hall dedicated to learning and exploring foreign cultures. Participants live together on a floor which includes a classroom/lounge, where they can socialize in the language. Also, they meet regularly during the week for a specially‐designed, two credit conversation/culture course.  To qualify for the Chinese Language Program, you must have some proficiency in Chinese and a willingness to become more fluent. You must make a year’s commitment to the program; enroll in a 2 credit conversation/culture course each semester, taught on the floor; enroll concurrently in a 3‐credit departmental course; speak the language as much as possible on the floor.

Email rap@acad.umass.edu for an application.  2 credits.

Chinese 247  INTENSIVE ELEMENTARY CHINESE II: READING & WRITING (6 Credits)

This is a continuation of Chinese 127 designed for students with significant Chinese background in listening and speaking. This course provides advanced-beginning students with Mandarin Chinese language skills training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Reading and writing will be emphasized. Students will learn both Chinese language culture through content-based teaching materials and task-oriented activities. By the end of the semester, students will be able to comprehend and engage in basic conversations, to read simple authentic materials, and to write sentences and paragraphs.

Prerequisite: Chinese 126/127/120 or instructor’s permission. * Offered in spring semester only.

CHINESE 326           INTENSIVE INTERMEDIATE CHINESE I

Course develops ability in spoken Mandarin and increases knowledge of Chinese characters. Prerequisite is Chinese 246 (Intensive Elementary Chinese II).   6 credits.  *Offered in Fall only.

CHINESE 327           INTENSIVE INTERMEDIATE CHINESE II

Develops student's reading and speaking ability in Mandarin. Students should recognize approximately 1800 characters by year's end. Course will be centered around reading, as well as viewing and discussing several short plays from the People's Republic of China. Other assignments include frequent quizzes, unit exams, homework assignments, and class attendance. Prerequisite is Chinese 326 or permission of the instructor. 6 credits.  *Offered in Spring only.

CHINESE 375           INTRODUCTION TO CHINESE LINGUISTICS

Introduction to the general nature of modern Chinese syntax. Survey of phonological and syntactic structures, vocabulary makeup and development in this century, current changed in the writing system, progress in standardization, and major typological characteristics. Mandarin and other dialects will be analyzed and discussed. Prerequisite is Chinese 327.

CHINESE 391G        JUNIOR YEAR WRITING

All undergraduates are required by the University to complete a course in their major for the Junior Year Writing program in order to graduate. The principal thrust of the course will be toward the development of the student's skill in writing English academic and analytical prose, as well as the research that accompanies this writing. Prerequisite for the course is the successful completion of the University's College Writing (CW) requirements (English 112 or 113).  1 credit.

CHINESE 394PI       CHINESE POPULAR CULTURE

This comprehensive survey of popular culture in modern China has two main purposes: first, providing a structured context for students to reflect on their learning in Chinese language, literature, and culture; second, enabling the students to explore and integrate the connections between their lived experience of Chinese culture and training through General Education in literature, film, history, sociology, political science, anthropology and communications. Students will engage with learning and experience through multiple ways. We will examine various forms of popular culture: newspaper, magazines, advertisements, popular literature, film, television, music, theater, folk arts, posters, fashion, festivities, digital media, etc. We will apply theories to actual cases and look at these cases contextually through a multifaceted perspective: cultural, socio-political, psychological, and ideological. Issues to consider throughout this course will cover: how to define popular culture in modern China? What is the relationship between popular and elite culture? How does popular culture work in structuring and shaping Chinese life? What role does popular culture play in Chinese pursuit of modernity and global membership? Satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-Chinse majors.

CHINESE 394WI     WOMEN IN CHINESE CULTURE         

 “Women in Chinese Culture” is designed as an Integrative Experience course for Chinese majors. This course focuses on the representation of women and the constitution of gender in Chinese culture as seen through literature and mass media. It focuses on literary and visual representations of women to examine important issues such as the relationship between gender and power, self and society, and tradition and modernity. This course has a dual goal: to explore how women’s social role has evolved from pre‐modern China to the present and to examine important issues such as women’s agency, “inner‐outer” division, and the yin yang dichotomy in Chinese literature and culture.  This is an Integrative Experience course that is open to Chinese majors only.

Chinese 426                ADVANCED CHINESE I (3 Credits)

This is the first half of the third-year Chinese language course, a continuation of intermediate Chinese. It is a comprehensive course at the advanced level that intends to develop students’ aptitudes in the four language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) of Mandarin Chinese as well as discourse and/or pragmatic competence. In addition, the course focuses on the formal written Chinese.

Prerequisite: Chinese 327 or instructor’s permission. *Offered in fall semester only.

Chinese 427                  ADVANCED CHINESE II (3 Credits)

This is the second semester of the third-year Chinese language course. It is a comprehensive course at the advanced level that intends to further develop students’ aptitudes in the four language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) of Mandarin Chinese, as well as discourse and/or pragmatic competence. In addition, the course focuses on the formal written Chinese.

Prerequisite: Chinese 427 or instructor’s permission. *Offered in fall semester only.

CHINESE 433           BUSINESS CHINESE

Introduction to the terminology and the basic business language skills for doing business in Chinese. Emphasize formal language style in business language use. Develops practical, cultural and social skills in doing business with and in China, as well as fluency in reading authentic texts and documents of business Chinese. Prerequisite: Chinese 426 or permission of the instructor.

CHINESE 450           ELEMENTARY CLASSICAL CHINESE

An introduction to the vocabulary, grammar and rhetorical features of classical Chinese; readings of core texts in the tradition of Chinese philosophical and historical discourse. 4 credits.

CHINESE 451           INTERMEDIATE CLASSICAL CHINESE

450 or 450H or permission of the instructor. This course is a continuation of Chinese 450, Elementary Classical Chinese. Students will gain further experience with the basic grammar and rhetorical features of Classical Chinese Poetry and Poetic writing. Prerequisite: Chinese 450.

CHINESE 498T        PRACTICUM & TUTORIAL

Non-native advanced students or native speakers of Chinese are assigned to work with one of the faculty/graduate students and assist in teaching beginning or intermediate Chinese by hosting conversation tables outside of class. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. 1-3 credits.

 

Asian Studies

ASIAN-ST 197B                   ST-Beginning Korean I

Beginning Korean I is thefirst half of a two‐semester introductory course in spoken and written Korean for students who do not have any previous knowledge of Korean.  This course is designed to improve students’ communicative competence in daily life, focusing on the four language skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing.  Some of the activities include oral dialogue journals (ODJ), expanding knowledge of vocabulary, conversation in authentic contexts, in‐depth study of grammar, listening comprehension, pronunciation practice, mini‐presentations, Korean film reviews and Korean film making.

ASIAN-ST 197C                   ST-Beginning Korean II

This course is the second part of the Beginning Korean sequence, which is designed to teach the fundamental skills to read, write, listen and speak in elementary level Korean.  Prior to taking this course, students are expected to read Hangul and to be able to talk about simple daily activities and carry a limited conversation with memorized phrases.  Compared to the first semester, more advanced vocabulary and grammar patterns will be introduced, and the students will learn how to integrate them into developed forms of application.  By the end of the course, students will be able to handle a variety of uncomplicated communicative tasks successfully and will be able to ask a few formulaic questions.  In addition to the textbook study in the classroom, audio-visual materials and activities will be used in class.

ASIAN-ST 297B                   ST-Intermediate Korean I

This course aims at the acquisition of language skills to read, write, listen and speak in intermediate-level Korean. It is designed for students who have taken Elementary Korean courses or proven to be at the equivalent level by the placement test.

ASIAN-ST 297C                   ST-Intermediate Korean II

This course aims at the acquisition of language skills to read, write, listen, and speak in intermediate-level Korean.  It is designed for students who have taken Intermediate Korean I (Asian-St 297B at UMass, KOR 201 at Smith, or Asian ST 262 at MHC) or proven to be at the equivalent level by the placement test.  In addition to the textbook study in the classroom, audio-visual materials and class activities are employed by the instructor.

ASIAN-ST 397B                   BRIDGING ASIA & AMERICA

Talks by local and visiting faculty, as well as film screenings and performances, designed to introduce students to the multi-layered connections between Asia and Asian America. Areas that will be considered include: popular culture, youth sub-cultures, labor, issues of gender and sexuality, and migration and immigrant communities. Discussions emphasize how issues play out at local and transnational levels. 2 credits

ASIAN-ST 491A                   SENIOR SEMINAR

Required of all students working toward the completion of the Certificate in Asian and Asian American Studies. Contact the Certificate Advisors for details. Interested students should contact Professor C.N. Le in the Sociology Dept., in Thompson Hall.

 

 

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Japanese

JAPANESE 110        NON-INTENSIVE ELEMENTARY JAPANESE

Beginning non-intensive course in modern standard Japanese. Students will develop basic skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing. Equivalent to the first half of Japanese 126 in content. Textbook: Genki I (Lessons 1-4). No prerequisites. 3 credits.  *Offered in Spring only.

JAPANESE 120        NON-INTENSIVE ELEMENTARY II

A continuation of Japanese 110. Beginning non-intensive course in modern standard Japanese. Students will develop basic skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing. Equivalent to the second half of Japanese 126 in content. Textbook: Genki I (Lessons 5-8). Prerequisite: Japanese 110.  3 credits.  Offered in Fall only.

JAPANESE 126        INTENSIVE ELEMENTARY JAPANESE I

Beginning intensive course in modern standard Japanese. Students will develop basic skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing. Textbook: Genki I (Lessons 1-8). No prerequisites. Students who have completed 110 with a grade of C or better are not eligible to take this course. 6 credits.  *Offered in Fall only.

JAPANESE 135        JAPANESE ARTS AND CULTURE

In this lecture course, students are introduced to the secular and religious arts and culture of Japan. We explore the cultural fabric of Japan from the ancient to the modern world, the writings of early aristocratic women and the male oral tradition of the great warrior epics. Samurai culture formed a close symbiosis with Noh theater, and the Zen-inspired arts of the tea ceremony and landscape gardening influenced the politics and religions of a country ravaged by civil wars. After 1600 the rising merchant class created artistic forms that appealed to the people in the centuries of enforced peace. Although modern Japan under Western influence modified its traditions and redefined its views on sexuality, it continued to demonstrate its culturally distinct points of intersection between anthropology and religion, art and architecture, history, politics, and literature.

JAPANESE 143        LIT-CLASSICAL & MEDIEVAL

Japanese 143 is a lecture survey course with as much time as possible devoted to discussion. Students will read, in English translation, the supreme masterpiece of Japanese literature, The Tale of Genji (ca. 1010), which is also the world's first novel and the only world classic written by a woman. Startlingly different from Murasaki Shikibu's subtle romance about the elegant Heian court is The Tale of the Heike, a warrior epic inspired by the political intrigues and the horrors of the Genpei War (1180-1185). This second monumental work of Japanese literature was first transmitted orally by blind itinerant monks who recited episodes pitching the rise of a samurai honor culture against the fall of courtly society to the percussive sound of the lute-like biwa. The Tale of the Heike (compiled in 1371) belongs, like Homer's Iliad, to a male oral tradition. Students are encouraged to link humanistic, aesthetic, and religious values to literary expression, visual culture, and cultural transformation. Class participation (depending on class size) and four quizzes; three papers. There are no prerequisites. This is a General Education AL/G course. 4-credits

JAPANESE 144        JAPANESE LITERATURE–1600-1945  

Survey of the literature of modern Japan from the first flowering of urban culture in the early 17th century to the “internationalized” writings of the mid-20th century. The course emphasizes reading and discussion of selected works (all in English) chosen for their accessibility as well as their position in the Japanese literary canon. Thematically, special attention is paid to the development of fiction and narrative out of the predominately poetic tradition. We also consider the effect on literature of the tremendous cultural upheaval brought about by the establishment of a modern “Westernized” state in Japan in the late 19th century. This is a General Education AL/G course. No prerequisites. 4 credits

JAPANESE 197C     INTRODUCTION TO JAPANESE RELIGIONS

In this course, studnets will survey the basic features of various religious traditions that exist in Japan while specifically examining the issues of nyonin kinsei (exclusion of women from religious space) and of multifacetedness of Buddhism in order to develop awareness about how religion could differ from culture to culture and how big an influence history could have on a religion. In so doing, the course is designed to let students come to a renewed understanding of their own religious traditions and establish a constructive guiding principle for that time when they encounter traditions of other peoples.

JAPANESE 197G     BUDDHIST CULTURES IN THE WORLD

In this course, students will first examine some of the basic teachings of Buddhism and then look at how Buddhism has been practiced in Tibet, Cambodia, Japan, and the US. As such, the course is also designed to promote logical thinking and broader perspectives. During the first half when we try to understand the basic teachings of this analytical religion, we will be mindful of how logic works. As we examine different Buddhist cultures in the latter half, we will focus on the differences in the cultural contexts on the one hand and the universal human needs that penetrate them on the other.

JAPANESE 197K     Postwar Japanese Literature

JAPANESE 197L     Manga/Anime

After antagonizing much of the rest of the world in World War II, and then waging a struggle for economic supremacy in the 1980’s, Japan now finds itself in the curious position of being a phenomenally successful exporter of pop-culture. The face of this wave of cultural exports has been manga (cartoons, comic books, and graphic novels) and anime (animation).This course has three fundamental aims. First, to give students tools to understand manga and anime on their own terms. Second, to investigate the role manga and anime play in Japan. Third, to examine the ways that manga and anime flow from one place to another and see what assumptions control or constrain that flow. To that end, we will examine manga and anime in their various forms such as newspaper comics, serialized graphic novels, made-for-television animation, OVA (original video animation), and feature length cinematic animation.

JAPANESE 197M                STUDY ABROAD IN JAPAN

This course is intended to help prepare students in the Japanese major and minor for the challenges of studying as an exchange (language) student in Japan. In addition to exploring the role and significance of US-Japan exchange students in Japanese and New England history this course guides students in the application process for exchange programs available to UMass Amherst undergraduates through the International Programs Office.  Priority is given to students who are committed to applying to study abroad in the coming academic year (including summer study abroad).  1 credit.

JAPANESE 235        PERFORMING ARTS OF JAPAN

Japan boasts a phenomenal variety of dramatic arts.  They range from the harvest and religious rituals still performed today to extremely experimental contemporary dance and theater forms.  This course adopts a two-pronged approach.  We will read and analyze examples from each of these dramatic forms, and we will also pay attention to the conventions and craft involved in the staging of these performances.  Thus while we will be attentive to the literary and social impact of the theater forms, we will also locate these theater forms in their historical settings and attempt to get a feel for the various techniques involved in the actual productions.  We will have numerous chances to appreciate these forms of theater through audio-visual materials. 

JAPANESE 246                    INTENSIVE ELEMENTARY JAPANESE II

A continuation of Japanese 120 and 126. Students will further develop basic skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing with an emphasis on the practical use of the Japanese language in various contexts. Textbook: Genki I (Lessons 9-12) & Genki II (Lessons 13-16). Prerequisite: Japanese 120 or 126. 6 credits.  *Offered in Spring only.

JAPANESE 285                    LANGUAGE SUITE CONVERSATION

The Thatcher Japanese Language House offers the opportunity to live in a residence hall dedicated to learning and exploring foreign cultures. Participants live together on a floor which includes a classroom/lounge, where they can socialize in the language. Also, they meet regularly during the week for a specially‐designed, two credit conversation/culture course.  To qualify for the Japanese Language Program, you must have some proficiency in Japanese and a willingness to become more fluent. You must make a year’s commitment to the program; enroll in a 2 credit conversation/culture course each semester, taught on the floor; enroll concurrently in a 3‐credit departmental course; speak the language as much as possible on the floor. Email rap@acad.umass.edu for an application.  2 credits.

JAPANESE 297B                 JAPANESE POP-CULTURE

Taking the perspective that we are all fans, this course explores the nature of fandom and the fan’s role in the production and consumption of popular culture.  We learn to critique and the problems of popular culture. Next we explore what fans look for in popular culture and then explore different popular genres in Japan, including music, movies, manga, and of course, Pokemon and Godzilla.  We end the course by investigating the phenomenon of character goods and what makes them so popular.

JAPANESE 326                    INTENSIVE INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE I

A continuation of Japanese 246. Students will further develop skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing at an intermediate level with an emphasis on natural communication in various contexts. Textbook: Genki II (Lessons 17-23). Prerequisite is Japanese 246. 6 credits. *Offered in Fall only.

JAPANESE 327                    INTENSIVE INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE II

A continuation of Japanese 326. Students will further develop skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing at an intermediate level with an emphasis on natural communication in various contexts and discussion of cultural and contemporary issues. Textbook: Tobira. Prerequisite: Japanese 326. 6 credits. *Offered in Spring only.

JAPANESE  Course# TBD             MODERN JAPANESE POETRY

This course covers major works in modern Japanese lyric poetry, beginning with the earliest Meiji-era long-form poems and ending with Wago Ryoichi's poems on the disasters of March 11, 2011.  We will pair the poems with critical essays that highlight crucial issues in modern poetics.  All readings are available in English, although graduate students will have the opportunity to engage with the poems in the original.

JAPANESE 375        INTRODUCTION TO JAPANESE LINGUISTICS

Introduction to the nature of Japanese phonology, semantics, syntax, and pragmatics. Following a brief survey of basic linguistic concepts, the course focuses on the structure of modern Japanese, comparative linguistics, Japanese language acquisition, and controversial issues in Japanese linguistics. Prerequisite: Japanese 326.

JAPANESE 391T     Tokyo Through Literature and Film

JAPANESE 391G     JUNIOR YEAR WRITING

All undergraduates are required by the University to complete a course in their major for the Junior Year Writing program in order to graduate. The principal thrust of the course will be toward the development of the student's skill in writing English academic and analytical prose, as well as the research that accompanies this writing. Prerequisite for the course is the successful completion of the University's College Writing (CW) requirements (English 112 or 113). 3 credits

JAPANESE 391M    QUEER JAPAN IN LITERATURE AND CULTURE
"Queer Japan in Literature and Culture" is an upper‐level seminar that will meet one day a week for three hours and explore same‐sex desire and love in Japan from the Heian period to the present. Not only will we read queer literature from all periods of Japanese history, but we will also read secondary literature about queer theory and same‐sex desire, some of which has been written in the West about the West and some of which is specifically about Japan.  Much of what we do will be guided by the interests of the students, but we will read some fundamental texts as well that will help shape our discussions of what queer theory/literature/culture is.  The responsibilities of the students will be weekly presentations on the readings, written summaries of outside material not specifically assigned for the course, a strong desire to talk about and discuss Japanese queer culture, and a final paper project of 15 pages for undergrads and 25 pages for grad students.  Enrollment by permission of instructor only.

JAPANESE 391S      WOMEN WRITERS IN JAPAN  
Although Japan was famous for its thriving female literary culture during the Heian era (794‐1185), the centuries  that followed were ones in which women authors appear to have played a minor role. It was not until the Meiji Restoration in 1868, with its emphasis upon new and “modern” cultural attitudes and norms, that women became a more significant presence on the Japaneseliterary scene. In this course, we will explore a number of works from this modern revival of Japanese women’s writing, identify themes that these women explore, the genres to which they contribute, and interrogate the notion of “women’s literature” itself to see how the term has been used (or abused) in the Japanese academy.  For undergraduates only.

JAPANESE 392M    BUDDHISM & THE JAPANESE LITERARY ARTS  
This course is an investigation into the meeting of two worlds: Buddhist culture from the continent and the literary culture of the Japanese court and monasteries. After spending one week on an overview of Buddhism before Japan, we will turn to how this ‘new’ religion interacted with the elegant culture of the capital as well as how it was expressed by those who practiced its doctrines. The class will meet once a week and will demand significant student participation/discussion. The reading load is substantial. You will be expected to write two papers for the course. Some knowledge of either Buddhism or Japan is highly recommended.

JAPANESE 393A                 HEIAN LITERARY CULTURE

In “Heian Literary Culture” we will go beyond The Tale of Genji to look closely at a number of other Heian period literary works (all in English translation) that are sometimes skimmed over in survey courses. We also ground our view of this literature in the culture and history of the period, looking at recent scholarly studies for secondary readings. It is strongly recommended that students have a general knowledge of the Heian period before they register for this course. Please contact the instructor for a suggested reading list.

JAPANESE 397M                JAPANESE BUDDHISM & THE LITERARY ARTS

This course will examine how Japanese Buddhism manifested itself in its literature–primarily through poetry and tales—from the Nara to the Tokugawa periods. Prerequisites: one course in premodern Japanese literature or one course in pre-modern Japanese religion/Buddhism.

JAPANESE 397R                 GIFT-GIVING IN JAPAN

Gift Giving is, and always has been, very important to Japanese society. This course will explore how gift giving works and how it has changed over time to give us a dynamic and holistic picture of Japanese society.

JAPANESE 494SI                SHINBUN: NEWSPAPERS AS MODERN CULTURE

Since the late 19th century newspapers have been a vital element in the shaping and dissemination of culture as well as news. Mass media in Japan are now entering a new phase shaped by the internet and attendant technologies. Major topics will include: technology transfer and its impact on culture; the role of mass media in script and education reform; nationalism, latent and overt; censorship and political involvement; the newspaper novel; coverage of sports and celebrities; reader presence on newspaper pages; the cultural and economic role of the newspaper publisher; and the debate about the place of print media in the internet era. We will also pay attention to comparative aspects, reading coverage of historic and contemporary events and topics in U.S. newspapers as well. Satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-Japan majors.

JAPANESE 497A                 READINGS IN MODERN JAPANESE I

Readings in Japanese from a variety of contemporary sources, including short fiction, plays, newspapers, magazines and electronic media. This course will focus on readings for comprehension with attention to the  acquisition of greater kanji and vocabulary recognition skills, mastery of grammatical structures of written Japanese, and the development of familiarity with Japanese cultural concepts. Prerequisite: Japanese 327.  *Offered in Fall only.

JAPANESE 497B     CONTEMPORARY JAPANESE I           
This non‐intensive third year course continues from Japanese 327: Intensive Intermediate II leading tocompletion of textbook‐centered coursework and preparing students for working exclusively with authentic materials. Strong emphasis on oral proficiency and development of compositional skills, with attention also on  increasing kanji recognition and production. Discussion primarily in Japanese. Prerequisite: Japanese 327.  3 credits.  *Offered in Fall only.

JAPANESE 497C   READINGS IN MODERN JAPANESE II

Longer readings from a selection of authentic modern Japanese literary materials, essays, and newspaper articles; also integratingreadings from textbook covered in Japanese 497D. Emphasis continues from Japanese 497A on readingcomprehension, kanji acquisition, and development of independence in grammatical and lexical analysis. Prerequisite: Japanese 497A or permission of instructor. 3 credits.  *Offered in Spring only.

JAPANESE 497D           CONTEMPORARY JAPANESE II

A continuation of Japanese 497B. Students will further develop skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing at an intermediate-high level with an emphasis on natural communication in various contexts and discussion on cultural and contemporary issues. Further emphasis on oral fluency and development of compositional skills. Preparing students for working exclusively with authentic materials. Instruction and discussion are in Japanese. Prerequisite: Japanese 497B. 3 credits.  *Offered in Spring only.

JAPANESE 498T     TUTORIAL AND PRACTICUM

Non-native advanced students or native speakers of Japanese are assigned to work with one of the faculty and assist in teaching beginning or intermediate Japanese. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. 1-3 credits.

JAPANESE 499C     HONORS THESIS SEMINAR – THE SAMURAI         
The honors thesis seminar explores the unique culture of the samurai warrior class from its ancient origins to its transformation under the Tokugawa regime and its demise in modern times. To the West, the enigma of Japan emerges from the samurai honor code the combines seemingly incompatible practices like Zen training and ritual suicide. How could a warrior class exist through a peace by practicing, philosophically, the Way of the Sword? In addition to aspects of samurai warfare and the philosophy of death, we will also study the samurai way of love. Among the primary and secondary material will be samurai legends and tales, the theater of war, and eight samurai films.

The Samurai is a 4-credit seminar open to senior honors students (junior honors students with special permission of the instructor). It is the first part of a two‐semester 8‐credit honors thesis seminar. Preference in registration is given to Commonwealth Honors College seniors using this course toward their honors thesis requirement; others as space permits. Graduate students may enroll under Proseminar JPN 592G. No prerequisites. 4 credits

JAPANESE 499D     HONORS THESIS SEMINAR: REBELS AND MARTYRS

This is the second half of the yearlong honors thesis seminar JAPANESE 499C/D. For a description of the first half, see under JAPANESE 499C. The spring half of the honors thesis seminar addresses issues of rebellion and martyrdom in Premodern and Modern Japan under the rubric of “sacrifice.” We will analyze primary and secondary literature as well as films on a variety of topics. For Premodern Japan, we will focus on human sacrifices in Noh drama, rebels following the Way of Tea, Japanese Christian martyrs, blood avengers, children as rebels and martyrs, peasant rebels, social rebels committing double suicide, and common folk calling the shots through religious world-renewal movements. For Modern Japan, we will explore the motivations of assassins in the late Tokugawa (Bakumatsu) and Meiji periods, of rebels in 20th-century feminist and proletarian movements, and of soldiers in the Pacific War.

JAPAN 499D fulfills the IE (Integrative Experience) requirement. No prerequisites. 4 credits

 
 

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