Faculty

Below is a list of faculty at UMass Amherst who regularly teach courses that count toward the Asian & Asian American Studies Certificate, and/or whose research interests relate to Asian Studies or Asian American Studies.


THERESA Y. AUSTIN
Prof. Austin is an Associate Professor in the Department of Teacher Studies and Curriculum Development in the School of Education. She received her B.A. in 1976, M.A. in 1980, and Ph.D. in 1991, all from the University of California at Los Angeles. Her professional interests include Bilingualism Through Second and Foreign Language Education; Sociocultural Issues in Second Language Learning; Language and Literacy Policy and Planning; Cross-Cultural Pragmatics; Technology-Assisted Language Learning; Foreign Language Teacher Education; ESL/Bilingual Testing and Evaluation. She can be reached at taustin@educ.umass.edu and a copy of her vita is here (485 PDF).


BRUCE BAIRD
Associate Professor in Japanese, Herter 717, 413-577-4992, baird@asianlan.umass.edu


DORIS G. BARGEN
Prof. Bargen is an Associate Professor of Japanese. She receive her Ph.D. at Tubingen Universitv (Germany) in 1978. Her areas of research are Classical Japanese Literature, Japanese Women writers, Japanese Film, and Japanese Theater. Her teaching responsibilities include Classical & Medieval Japanese Literature, Modern Japanese Literature, Women in Japanese Literature & Film and Classical Japanese. She can be reached in Herter 439, 413-545-4955, and at dgbargen@asianlan.umass.edu.


Zen

E. BRUCE BROOKS
Prof. Brooks is Research Professor of Chinese. He received his Ph.D. in Chinese Language and Literature from the University of Washington, 1968. His areas of research include Warring States Text Chronology, Chinese Prosody, Chinese Grammar and Warring States History and Society. His teaching responsibilities are Warring States Texts. His office number is 413-584-1810 and his email is ebbrooks@research.umass.edu.


BRIANKLE CHANG
Briankle Chang is an Associate Professor in Communication and his research interests include cultural studies, media criticism, and the philosophy of communication. He can be contacted in Machmer Hall 310 and at 545-3742 or bchang@comm.umass.edu.


ELENA SUET-YING CHIU
Assistant Professor in Chinese, Herter 333, 413-545-5840, and chiu@llc.umass.edu.


ANNE CIECKO
Anne Ciecko is an Associate Professor in the Department of Communication and a participating faculty member in the Interdepartmental Film Program. Prof. Ciecko has taught the "Bridging Asia & Asia America" colloquium required for certificate students, as well as designed and taught a new course on Asian Pacific American Cinema (Comm 397S). She regularly teaches courses on popular Asian cinema, contemporary world cinema (Comm 397T, every spring), intercultural cinema, international film stars, and women filmmakers. She has also organized and curated annual Asian and Asian American film festivals and symposia at UMASS, and is the faculty coordinator for the popular one-credit Multicultural Film Festival course (Comm 296F), offered every spring. Her research on international cinema, including Asian and Asian diaspora cinemas, has appeared in many scholarly journals and anthologies. Her areas of research are Global cinema, gender studies and critical cultural studies. Her current and ongoing research projects focus on the international film star; diasporic film cultures, especially global reception of popular Indian films (Bollywood); transcultural film, video, and multimedia installations by women. She can be reached at ciecko@comm.umass.edu and 413-545-6348.


RICHARD CHU
Prof. Chu previously taught at the University of San Francisco and was awarded a Ph.D. from the University of Southern California in December of 2003. Prof. Chu studies the history of ethnic identity in the Philippines, where indigenous pepoles and immigrants from China and the Pacific have negotiated identity -- and power relations -- under a series of empires (Muslim, British, Spanish, American, and Japanese) over centuries. He regularly teaches History 197, "Empire, Race, & the Philippines" here at UMass this fall and other courses on the Philippines and Pacific empires.


NILANJANA DASGUPTA
Assistant Professor Dasgupta's work in the Psychology Department focuses on the interface of nonconscious social cognition and intergroup relations. She studies how the culture in which people live shapes their mind and affects their overt and covert social behavior toward disadvantaged and advantaged groups. She is located in Tobin Hall 635 and can be contacted at 545-0049 or dasgupta@psych.umass.edu.


JANE DEGENHARDT
Jane Degenhardt is a Five-College Assistant Professor of English, based at the University of Massachusetts. She has specialties in two fields: English Renaissance drama and Asian American literature. In addition to teaching courses on Shakespeare, she teaches Introduction to Asian American Literature and upper level courses in Comparative Ethnic Literatures, Mixed Race Identity, and Asian Americans and Citizenship in the Early Twentieth Century. She is located in Bartlett Hall 459 and can be contacted at janed@english.umass.edu.


Asian Lion

RANJANAA DEVI
Professor Devi is trained in classical Indian dance and theater. She received her BA and MA from Delhi University. She is also the founder and Director of the Asian Dance and Music Program on campus and President/Artistic Director of Nataraj, Inc., a professional dance company. She has received grants from the Massachusetts Cultural Council, the New England Foundation for the Arts, the Community Foundation of Western Massachusetts, and the Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities. Professor Devi has also taught at Jacob's Pillow Dance Festival, Williams College, daCi International Conference (Sydney, Australia), and Smith College. Her email is devi@admin.umass.edu.


YI FENG
Lecturer in Chinese, Herter 515, 413-545-4957, yif@asianlan.umass.edu


STEPHEN M. FORREST
Stephen M. Forrest is a Senior Lecturer in Japanese. He received his Ph.D. at Harvard University in Japanese Literature. His areas of research include Classical Japanese poetry collections and poetry theory, Japanese poetry abroad, Literature of travel in Pre-modern Japan, publishing, and bibliography in Japan and Manuscript texts. His teaching responsibilities include Introduction to Classical Japanese I (J556H), Manuscript Japanese (J597A), Pre-Modern and Modern Japanese Literature (in translation) (J 144/ComLit 152), Research in Japanese Sources (J570H) and Elementary Research in Japanese Studies (J297A). He can be reached at Herter 441, 413-545-4950, and at sforrest@asianlan.umass.edu.


LAUREL E. FOSTER-MOORE
Laurel E. Foster-Moore is the Study Abroad Coordinator/Asia, International Programs Office. She can be reached at fostermo@ipo.umass.edu.


PIPER GAUBATZ
Prof. Gaubatz is an Associate Professor in the Geoscience Department. Her research include Urban Studies, China, Japan, and the U.S. She received her B.A, at Princeton, 1984: M.A.. California at Berkeley, 1986: Ph.D. 1989, Prof. Gaubatz is an urban geographer with a background in sociology, architecture and Chinese studies. She also directs the campus-wide Asian Area Studies program. Within the field of urban geography, her research specialization is urban morphology - the analysis of urban form. Her current research projects include The New Chinese City. Urban Restructuring in Contemporary Japan, People and Environment on the Northern Chinese Frontiers. She can be reached at gaubatz@geo.umass.edu.


HAIVAN HOANG
Haivan Hoang is an Assistant Professor in English and she received her Bachelor's degree from UC Berkeley, her Master's from Cal State Hayward, and her Ph.D. from Ohio State. Her research and teaching interests are in rhetoric and composition. Her office is in Bartlett Hall 267 and she can be contacted at 545-2972 and hhoang@english.umass.edu.


MOON-KIE JUNG
Moon-Kie Jung is Professor in the Department of Sociology. His areas of research and teaching interest include comparative racial formations, labor, migration, state, empire, and Asian American Studies. He is a co-editor, with João H. Costa Vargas and Eduardo Bonilla-Silva, of State of White Supremacy: Racism, Governance, and the United States (2011) and the author of Reworking Race: The Making of Hawaii's Interracial Labor Movement (2006) and Beneath the Surface of White Supremacy: Denaturalizing U.S. Racisms Past and Present (in press). He can be reached at mjung@umass.edu.


SANGEETA KAMAT
Prof. Kamat is an Associate Professor in the Department of Educational Policy Research and Administration. She received her B.A. at Sophia College, Bombay, India, 1985; M.A.; The Tata Institute of Social Science, Bombay, India, 1988; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh, 1998. Her professional interests include globalization and education; critical theory; gender analysis and South Asia. She can be reached at skamat@educ.umass.edu.


MILIANN KANG
Prof. Kang is an Assistant Professor of the Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies Department. She received her B.A. magna cum laude in Social Studies at Harvard University and her M.A. and Ph.D. in Sociology at New York University, 2001. She arrived at UMass in the fall of 2003 and teaches in the Women's Studies program and is affiliated with the Sociology Department. Her research is on Asian immigrant women's work in the service economy and her upcoming book, The Managed Hand: Race, Gender, and the Body in Beauty Service Work, focuses on Korean women in the nail salon industry. Her other areas of interest are the social construction of race, gender and class, Asian American activism, second generation families, and ethnography. She also teaches a course on "Asian American Women: Gender, Race and Immigration." She can be reached at mkang@wost.umass.edu or 413-577-0710.


MAKO KOYAMA-HARTSFIELD
Lecturer in Japanese, Herter 335, 413-545-4958, mako@llc.umass.edu


C.N. LE
Prof. Le is a Senior Lecturer in the Sociology department and also the Director of the Asian & Asian American Studies Certificate Program at UMass Amherst. His main research focuses on using Census data to describe and compare assimilation outcomes (socioeconomic, marital, residential, and entrepreneurial) among different Asian American ethnic groups, with a particular focus on Vietnamese Americans. He is the author of the book Asian American Assimilation: Ethnicity, Immigration, and Socioeconomic Attainment (2007). He teaches the "Sociology of the Asian American Experience" and "Bridging Asian and Asian America Colloquium" courses every year and also maintains a website titled Asian-Nation: Asian American History, Demographics, and Culture. He can be reached at and 413-545-4074.


Yin and Yang

YOUNGHAN LEE
Younghan Lee is an Assistant Professor in the department of Sport Management. He received his Ph.D. from Seoul National University and his research interests include sports marketing and management and Korean professional sports. His contact information: 413-545-5694, ylee@isenberg.umass.edu, and office in Isenberg 236B.


YU LIU
Lecturer in Chinese, Herter 530, 413-545-6684, liuyu@asianlan.umass.edu


RAHSAAN MAXWELL
Professor Maxwell is an Assistant Professor in Polical Science. His research examines the politics of ethnic, racial, religious, and migration-related diversity, with a particular focus on Western Europe. He can be reached in Thompson 328 and at rahsaan@polsci.umass.edu.


STEPHEN MILLER
Prof. Miller is an Associate Professor of Japanese. Has received his Ph.D. in Japanese Language and Literature from the University of California Los Angeles in 1993. He can be reached at Herter 336, 413-545-0208, and smiller@asianlan.umass.edu.


ASHA NADKARNI
Asha Nadkarni is a new Assistant Professor in the English Department, having recently received her Ph.D. from Brown University. Her research and teaching interests include postcolonial literature and theory, transnational feminism, theories of development, nineteenth- and twentieth-century American literature (canonical and ethnic), and literatures and cultures of the South Asian diaspora. She is located at Bartlett Hall 491 and can be contacted at 545-5523 or nadkarni@english.umass.edu.


GIANG PHAN
Giang Phan is an Assistant Professor in the Communication Disorder department. She received her doctorate degree from the University of Minnesota. She conducts research on language development and disorders with bilingual children. She is fluent in Vietnamese, Spanish, and English. Her office is located at 358 North Pleasant Street, office 308A, her office telephone is 413-545-8468, and her email is gtpham@comdis.umass.edu.


HOANG G. PHAN
Prof. Phan is an Assistant Professor in English and he received his Bachelor's degree from the University of Chicago and his Ph.D. from UC Berkeley. His fields of research include eighteenth- and nineteenth-century American literature, African American literature, Asian American Literature, Marxism, Postcolonial Theory, and Legal-Literary Studies. He is located in Bartlett Hall 291 and can be contacted at 545-2979 or hgphan@english.umass.edu.


STEPHEN PLATT
Professor Platt is an Assistant Professor in the History department. His research interests include modern China and nationalism.


ROMMELL SALVADOR
Rommell Salvador is an Assistant Professor in the Hospitality & Tourism Management department. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Central Florida and his research interests include hospitality personnel management, occupational health and safety training, and diversity in teams and in the workplace. His contact information: 413-545-4042, rsalvador@isenberg.umass.edu, and office at Flint 204B.


SIGRID SCHMALZER
Prof. Schmalzer is an Assistant Professor in the History department. She received her Ph.D. from the University of California, San Diego in 2004 and her fields of interest include modern Chinese history, history of science, and history of popular culture. Professor Schmalzer has published two articles on the interactions between scientific and local forms of knowledge in rural Chinese communities, entitled "Breeding a Better China: Pigs, Practices, and Place in a Chinese County, 1929-1937" (2002) and "Fishing and Fishers in Penghu, Taiwan, 1895-1970" (2002). Her research has been supported by fellowships from the National Science Foundation, Fulbright, and the Social Science Research Council.


DAVID K. SCHNEIDER
Prof. Schneider is an Assistant Professor in the Asian Languages & Literatures program, Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures. He received his Ph.D. in Chinese Language and Literature from the University of California, Berkeley in 2005 and his Masters of International Affairs from the Columbia University School of International Affairs in 1987. His research primarily focuses on Late Medieval Chinese poetry and prose. He can be reached in Herter 442, 413-545-4954, and at dkschneider@asianlan.umass.edu.


Two Catfish

AMANDA C. SEAMAN
Amanda C. Seaman is Associate Professor of Japanese and the Director of the Asian Languages and Literature Program within the Languages, Literatures, and Cultures department. She received her Ph.D. in Japanese Literature from the University of Chicago, 2001. Her areas of research are Contemporary Japanese Literature and Culture, Japanese Women Writers and Gender and Popular Culture. Her teaching responsibilities for 2003-2004 include Japanese 144: Pre-modern and Modern Literature in translation, Japanese 297: Elementary Research in Japanese, Japanese 497B and 497D: 3rd year Contemporary Japanese 497C: readings in Modern Japanese II and Japanese 560H (Seminar in Literature): Pure/Pop. She can be reached at Herter 515, 413-545-6679, and acseaman@asianlan.umass.edu.


SVATI SHAH
Svati Shah is an Assistant Professor in the Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies Department. She received her B.A. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1992, her M.P.H. at Emory University, Rollins School of Public Health in 1997, and her Ph.D. from Columbia University in 2006. Her areas of research include political economy of migration, sex work, development, and urbanization in South Asia and South Asian diaspora.


ZHONGWEI SHEN
Prof. Shen is a Professor of Chinese. He received his Ph.D. in Linguistics from the University of California, Berkeley, 1993. His areas of research are Chinese Linguistics, Dialectology, Chinese Writing System, and Phonology. His teaching responsibilities include Introduction to Chinese Linguistics, History of the Chinese Language, Chinese Dialectology and Chinese Language. He can be reached in Herter 438, 413-545-4952, and at zwshen@asianlan.umass.edu.


REIKO SONO
Reiko Sono is a Senior Lecturer in Japanese. She received her Ph.D. (ABD) at Princeton University in Japanese Religion. Her areas of research are Japanese religions, the culture of gift giving, and Pre-modern Japanese History. Her teaching responsibilities are Death in Japanese Culture (J391) and Advanced Modern Japanese (J536 & J537). She can be reached at Herter 331, 413-545-4947, and rsono@asianlan.umass.edu.


PRIYANKA SRIVASTAVA
Prof. Srivastavais an Assistant Professor in History. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Cincinnati in 2012. Her research interests include Histories of Class, Labor and Urbanism, Class and Gender, Working Class and Associational Culture, Histories and Politics of Reproduction in Colonial India. She can be contacted at 709 Herter Hall, 413-545-6782, and priyanka@history.umass.edu.


ZHIJUN WANG
Associate Professor in Chinese, Herter Room 337, 413-545-4948, and zhijunw@asianlan.umass.edu


CAROLINE YANG
Caroline Yang is an Assistant Professor in the Dept. of English. She is currently completing a book manuscript titled Reconstruction's Labor: The Chinese Worker in American Literature after Slavery that examines the Chinese worker as a category of analysis in works by Ambrose Bierce, Mark Twain, Bret Harte, Sui Sin Far, and Charles Chesnutt. Her next project centers on figures and spaces of work in late twentieth century and contemporary Asian American and African American literatures in the context of global racial capitalism and military multiculturalism. In addition to Asian American and African American literary studies, her teaching and research interests include comparative race and ethnic studies, gender and sexuality studies, and transnational media and cultural studies. She can be reached at chyang@english.umass.edu.


YUKI YOSHIMURA
Lecturer in Japanese, Herter 329, 413-545-4953, yuki@asianlan.umass.edu


ENHUA ZHANG
Prof. Xhang is an Assistant Professor in the Asian Studies program, Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures. Her expertise is in modern Chinese literature, Chinese cinema and popular culture, Ming and Qing literature, and 'critical theory on space and the uncanny.' You can learn more about what that means by emailing her at ezhang@llc.umass.edu. She is completing her Ph.D. in East Asian Languages and Cultures at Columbia University.