Links
Academics

Courses

Chinese 110: Non-Intensive Elementary Chinese I

This is a beginning course of modern Mandarin Chinese for students with no prior exposure to the language. The content of this course includes: 1) An introduction to the Romanization phonetic system of Chinese (Pinyin); 2) Essential sentence structures and basic vocabulary in the area of greeting, self-introduction, family, hobbies and visiting friends; 3) Approximately 180 characters in simplified form. The major goal of this course in to help students develop the basic skill in listening, speaking, reading and writing.
NOTES    Offered in Spring semester only. Equivalent to the first half of Chinese 126 in content
PREREQUISITES    None
CREDITS    3


Chinese 120: Non-Intensive Elementary Chinese II 

This is a continuation of Chinese 110. The content of this course includes: 1) Essential sentence structures and basic vocabulary in the area of school life, language learning, making an appointment and shopping. 2) Approximately 120 characters in simplified form. The major goal of this course is to help students further develop proficiency in four skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing.
NOTES    Offered in Fall semester only. Equivalent to the second half of Chinese 126 in content
PREREQUISITES    Chinese 110 (Non-Intensive Elementary Chinese I) or the equivalent
CREDITS    3


Chinese 126: Intensive Elementary Chinese

This is a beginning intensive course on modern Mandarin Chinese for students with no prior exposure to the language. The content of this course includes: 1) An introduction to the Romanization phonetic system of Chinese (Pinyin); 2) Approximately 300 Basic Chinese characters in simplified form; 3) Essential grammar and sentence structures; 5) Basic vocabulary and conversations in both formal and informal settings and 4) Various aspects of Chinese culture, lifestyle and social-cultural conventions. The major goal of this course is to focus on students’ overall development of communicative competence in listening, speaking, reading and writing.
NOTES    Offered in Fall semester only
PREREQUISITES    None
CREDITS    6


Chinese 127: Intensive Elementary Chinese I - Reading & Writing

This is a parallel course to Chinese 126 designed for students with significant Chinese background in listening and speaking. The goal is to lay a good foundation in Chinese for further study and to strive for a well-rounded development of communicative skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Mandarin Chinese. It provides basic training on pronunciation and tones, character recognition and production skills, syntactic structures and usage, and high-frequency vocabulary. Skills in reading and writing are emphasized.
NOTES    Offered in Fall semester only
PREREQUISITES    Permission of instructor
CREDITS    6


Chinese 136: Introduction to Chinese Cinema

This class presents an introduction to Chinese cinema from its birth in 1905 up to the present. It focuses on the close-reading and appreciation of representative Chinese films. Arranged chronologically and thematically, this course examines interaction of film texts with social contexts. In-depth analyses of films from Mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan leads students to consider theoretical questions such as film aesthetics, production, distribution, and reception. Topics include relationships of cinema and mass culture, history, ideology, colonialism, and globalization.
NOTES    Knowledge of modern Chinese history helpful
PREREQUISITES    None
CREDITS    3


Chinese 140: Chinese Script

This course introduces the logographic nature of the Chinese writing system and its historical development and contemporary variations, analyzes the structure of Chinese characters, and develops ability to recognize Chinese characters in a variety of printed and non-printed forms, with emphasis on hands-on experience. Lectures with demonstrations.
NOTES    Knowledge of Chinese characters helpful but not necessary
PREREQUISITES    None
CREDITS    3


Chinese 150: Peoples and Languages of China 

This course introduces social and cultural diversity through the lens of language. Three main foci: classification of the minorities and their languages, language contact and the formation of Chinese dialects, and the role of language in identifying ethnic groups and in maintaining distinct cultures.
NOTES    Knowledge of Chinese is helpful but not necessary
PREREQUISITES    None
CREDITS    3


Chinese 197Q: Late Imperial Chinese Literature and Culture 

This course is an introduction to the Qing dynasty (1644-1911) through various genres of literature, including the novel, classical short story, banner-men tale (zidishu), and poetry, with an emphasis on the cultural interaction that took place between the Manchu and Han peoples.  
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    None
CREDITS    3


Chinese 197S: China in World Affairs

This course starts with a question: Why does China behave as it does in international affairs? Why are there problems in Tibet and Xinjiang? Will the Chinese Navy continue to experience clashes with other countries in the East and South China Seas? Are there Asian values that differ fundamentally from Western values? Can China re-balance its economy? We will explore these and many more questions by way of an interdisciplinary approach to Chinese civilization from its beginnings to the present.
NOTES    Conducted in English; no knowledge of Chinese required
PREREQUISITES    None
CREDITS    3


Chinese 241: Contemporary Chinese Literature

The development of modern China as seen through its literature covering the period 1915-1989. Exploration of the relationship between writing and political change, the role of dissident writers, and the politics of gender in texts from mainland China and Taiwan.
NOTES    All readings are in English translation. This is a Gen-Ed AL/G course
PREREQUISITES    None
CREDITS    3


Chinese 242: Chinese Vernacular Literature 

This course surveys the nature and development of traditional Chinese literature written in the vernacular over a period of more than 1,000 years from the Tang through Qing dynasties. Students read selections in English translation from major works and become familiar with genres, such as ballads, transformation texts (bianwen), vernacular short stories, novels, and bannermen tales (zidishu).
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    None
CREDITS    3


Chinese 246: Intensive Elementary Chinese II 

This is a continuation of Chinese 120 or 126. The content of this course includes: 1) training in pronunciation and tones, accuracy and fluency in speaking; 2) Approximately 350 Chinese character in simplified form; 3) Essential grammar and sentence structures; 4) Basic vocabulary and conversations in both formal and informal settings, and 5) Various aspects of Chinese culture, lifestyle and social-cultural conventions. The major goal of this course is to further develop students’ communicative competence in listening, speaking, reading and writing.
NOTES    Offered in Spring semester only
PREREQUISITES    Chinese 120/126
CREDITS    6


Chinese 247: Intensive Elementary Chinese II - Reading & Writing

This is a continuation of Chinese 127 designed for students with significant Chinese background in listening and speaking. This course provides advanced-beginning students with Mandarin Chinese language skills training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Reading and writing will be emphasized. Students will learn both Chinese language culture through content-based teaching materials and task-oriented activities. By the end of the semester, students will be able to comprehend and engage in basic conversations, to read simple authentic materials, and to write sentences and paragraphs.  
NOTES    Offered in Spring semester only
PREREQUISITES    Chinese 126/127/120, or instructor’s permission
CREDITS    6


Chinese 285: Thatcher Language House 

The Thatcher Chinese Language House offers the opportunity to live in a residence hall dedicated to learning and exploring foreign cultures. Participants live together on a floor which includes a classroom/lounge, where they can socialize in the language. Also, they meet regularly during the week for a specially‐designed, two credit conversation/culture course.  To qualify for the Chinese Language Program, you must have some proficiency in Chinese and a willingness to become more fluent. You must make a year’s commitment to the program; enroll in a 2 credit conversation/culture course each semester, taught on the floor; enroll concurrently in a 3‐credit departmental course; speak the language as much as possible on the floor.
NOTES    Email rap@acad.umass.edu for an application
PREREQUISITES    Thatcher House Chinese Language Program enrollment
CREDITS    2


Chinese 326: Intensive Intermediate Chinese I 

Course develops ability in spoken Mandarin and increases knowledge of Chinese characters.
NOTES    Offered in Fall semester only
PREREQUISITES    Chinese 246
CREDITS    6


Chinese 327: Intensive Intermediate Chinese II 

Develops student's reading and speaking ability in Mandarin. Students should recognize approximately 1800 characters by year's end. Course will be centered around reading, as well as viewing and discussing several short plays from the People's Republic of China. Other assignments include frequent quizzes, unit exams, homework assignments, and class attendance.
NOTES    Offered in Spring semester only
PREREQUISITES    Chinese 326 or permission of the instructor
CREDITS    6


Chinese 375: Introduction to Chinese Linguistics

This is an introduction to Chinese linguistics for students who have taken Chinese 246 or equivalent. This class is a survey of the following aspects of the Chinese Language: its phonological and syntactic structures, its vocabulary makeup and development, the historical and current changes in its unique writing system, the progress in its standardization, its geographical variations, its history, its typological characteristics and its linguistic neighbors. Analyses based largely on data from Mandarin as well as other major dialects.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    Chinese 246
CREDITS    3


Chinese 381: Junior-Year Writing

All undergraduates are required by the University to complete a course in their major for the Junior Year Writing program in order to graduate. The principal thrust of the course will be toward the development of the student's skill in writing English academic and analytical prose, as well as the research that accompanies this writing.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    Successful completion of University's College Writing (CW) requirements (English 112 or 113)
CREDITS    3


Chinese 394PI: Chinese Popular Culture 

This comprehensive survey of popular culture in modern China has two main purposes: first, providing a structured context for students to reflect on their learning in Chinese language, literature, and culture; second, enabling the students to explore and integrate the connections between their lived experience of Chinese culture and training through General Education in literature, film, history, sociology, political science, anthropology and communications. Students will engage with learning and experience through multiple ways. We will examine various forms of popular culture: newspaper, magazines, advertisements, popular literature, film, television, music, theater, folk arts, posters, fashion, festivities, digital media, etc. We will apply theories to actual cases and look at these cases contextually through a multifaceted perspective: cultural, socio-political, psychological, and ideological. Issues to consider throughout this course will cover: how to define popular culture in modern China? What is the relationship between popular and elite culture? How does popular culture work in structuring and shaping Chinese life? What role does popular culture play in Chinese pursuit of modernity and global membership?
NOTES    Satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-Chinese majors
PREREQUISITES    None
CREDITS    3


Chinese 394 WI: Women in Chinese Cultures 

“Women in Chinese Culture” is designed as an Integrative Experience course for Chinese majors. This course focuses on the representation of women and the constitution of gender in Chinese culture as seen through literature and mass media. It focuses on literary and visual representations of women to examine important issues such as the relationship between gender and power, self and society, and tradition and modernity. This course has a dual goal: to explore how women’s social role has evolved from pre‐modern China to the present and to examine important issues such as women’s agency, “inner‐outer” division, and the yin yang dichotomy in Chinese literature and culture.  
NOTES    Satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-Chinese majors
PREREQUISITES    Open to Chinese majors only
CREDITS    3


Chinese 397D: Philosophy and Religion in Chinese Literature

In this seminar we will read some of the great books of the Chinese tradition, not only for their literary qualities, but also for their profound philosophical and religious ideas – questions of the divine in human life, ethics, the nature and reality of the self, politics, and many others. Readings will include works of philosophy, history, poetry, Buddhist sutras, drama, and fiction. All readings and discussion will be in English. No Chinese language is required. This course counts for credit toward the Chinese major.
NOTES    No Chinese language required; course counts for credit towards Chinese major
PREREQUISITES    None
CREDITS    3


Chinese 397S: Diplomacy and Culture in China and East Asia 

The rise of China as a major world power was dramatically demonstrated this fall as Beijing hosted the APEC summit meeting, which discussed some of the world’s most pressing issues, from economic growth to global security. What roles do culture and history play in the diplomacy of the People’s Republic of China? How do Chinese diplomats negotiate with other countries? In this course, we will explore real-world diplomatic cases concerning the economic, political and military relationships between China and the United States from a long-term, cross-cultural perspective. Instruction will be in English.
NOTES    Instruction will be in English; course counts as credit toward the Chinese Major
PREREQUISITES    None
CREDITS    3


Chinese 426: Advanced Chinese I

This is the first half of the third-year Chinese language course, a continuation of intermediate Chinese. It is a comprehensive course at the advanced level that intends to develop students’ aptitudes in the four language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) of Mandarin Chinese as well as discourse and/or pragmatic competence. In addition, the course focuses on the formal written Chinese.
NOTES    Offered in fall semester only
PREREQUISITES    Chinese 327 or instructor’s permission
CREDITS    3


Chinese 427: Advanced Chinese II

This is the second semester of the third-year Chinese language course. It is a comprehensive course at the advanced level that intends to further develop students’ aptitudes in the four language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) of Mandarin Chinese, as well as discourse and/or pragmatic competence. In addition, the course focuses on the formal written Chinese.
NOTES    Offered in spring semester only
PREREQUISITES    Chinese 427 or instructor’s permission
CREDITS    3


Chinese 432: Media Chinese

Introduction to the terminology and the basic business language skills for doing business in Chinese. Emphasize formal language style in business language use. Develops practical, cultural and social skills in doing business with and in China, as well as fluency in reading authentic texts and documents of business Chinese.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    Chinese 426 or permission of the instructor
CREDITS    3


Chinese 433: Business Chinese

Introduction to the terminology and the basic business language skills for doing business in Chinese. Emphasize formal language style in business language use. Develops practical, cultural and social skills in doing business with and in China, as well as fluency in reading authentic texts and documents of business Chinese.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    Chinese 426 or permission of the instructor
CREDITS    3


Chinese 450: Elementary Classical Chinese 

An introduction to the vocabulary, grammar and rhetorical features of classical Chinese; readings of core texts in the tradition of Chinese philosophical and historical discourse.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    Chinese 246/Japanese 327, or permission of the instructor
CREDITS    4


Chinese 498T: Practicum & Tutorial

Non-native advanced students or native speakers of Chinese are assigned to work with one of the faculty/graduate students and assist in teaching beginning or intermediate Chinese by hosting conversation tables outside of class.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    Permission of the instructor
CREDITS    1+


Chinese 498Y: Practicum 

Contact instructor for course details.
NOTES    Optional honors colloquium available for this course
PREREQUISITES    Department/program consent is required
CREDITS    1+


Chinese 526: Readings in Modern Chinese Literature I

Critical reading and appreciation of selections from modern Chinese literary works of various genres, including short stories, novels, plays and poems. Reading and discussion in Chinese.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    Chinese 427
CREDITS    3


Chinese 527: Readings in Modern Chinese Literature II 

Selected essays, short stories, and poems in baihua by such authors as Lu Xun, Zhou Zuoren, Mao Dun, You Dafu, Shen Congwen, and Ding Ling.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    Chinese 427 (Chinese 526 is not a prerequisite to Chinese 527)
CREDITS    3


Chinese 528: Chinese Language in Contexts 

Explores aspects of Chinese language as studies in traditional Chinese linguistics, historical linguistics, sociolinguistics, and Chinese dialectology. Topics include historical sources, traditional divisions, formation of the standard dialect (Mandarin), social variations and geographical distributions.
NOTES    For upper division/graduate students. (Lower division students can enroll in Chinese 375 companion course)
PREREQUISITES    Chinese 375 and Chinese 427
CREDITS    3


Chinese 555: Classical Chinese Poetry 

The Chinese poetic tradition is one of the great gems of world literature. The capacity of the classical Chinese language to express ideas in subtle and beautiful literary expressions is infinite. In this course we will read and study the relationship between ideas and literary expression in Chinese poetry from its beginnings into the Tang dynasty, treating philosophical and religious ideas about love, beauty, life and death, politics, moral action, history, nature and landscape, women, the supernatural, and literati life, while considering along the way issues of literary criticism and aesthetics.
NOTES    This course may be taken as the second semester of pre-modern Chinese required for the Chinese Major
PREREQUISITES    Chinese 450 or equivalent (readings are in Classical Chinese)
CREDITS    3


Chinese 575: Syntactic Structures of Chinese

The general nature of Chinese syntax: Mandarin in particular. Analysis of major syntactic constructions of Mandarin. Issues in Chinese linguistics. Topics include morphemes, words, compounds, phrases, sentence structures found in the various source materials, and various syntactic errors made by learners of Chinese language.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    2 years of Mandarin/Cantonese and Chinese 375
CREDITS    3


Chinese 576: History of Chinese Language 

This course is intended to provide students with information on the phonological history of the Chinese language. It will focus on: 1) various written sources materials: glosses on the classics, etymological works, rhyme books, rhyme tables etc., 2) the traditional and modern methods employed in the study of the phonological history of Chinese, and 3) the hypotheses raised regarding the reconstruction of the phonological systems at different historical stages. It is also intended to help students to develop the ability of using source materials in Chinese linguistics, and to enhance students' research skills in Classical Chinese.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    Chinese 375
CREDITS    3


Chinese 577: Chinese Dialectology 

This course investigates the linguistic structures of major Chinese dialects from a cross-dialectal, comparative approach. Also covered are issues pertaining to individual dialects as well as dialect classification and formation. Other topics, such as multilingualism, language planning, language contact, code-switching, will also be explored subject to class interest. Students should, at the end of the course, gain a deeper understanding of both the linguistic structure of some modern Chinese dialects and the relationship between the standard language and the dialects of Chinese in modern Chinese culture and society.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    Chinese 375 or permission of the instructor
CREDITS    3


Chinese 580: Teaching Chinese as a Foreign Language I 

Introduction to theory and research related to Chinese and other foreign language teaching methods with the emphasis on their application to Chinese teaching. Other topics include language pedagogy, lesson planning, teaching techniques, material development, testing, and teacher development.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    None
CREDITS    3


Chinese 581: Teaching Chinese as a Foreign Language II           

Examines research and significant issues concerning Chinese language teaching and learning, and their implications for classroom instruction. Topics include language acquisition, inter-language and error correction, testing and assessment, culture and language learning, heritage learners, learning strategies, use of technology.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    Chinese 580
CREDITS    3


Chinese 592S: Pre-Practicum 

For graduate students working towards certification only.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    Teacher Licensure Program enrollment
CREDITS    3


Chinese 597D: Confucianism

Confucianism is a nuanced and complex idea of a comprehensive culture that stems from Heaven and acts on earth through nature and human society. In its many forms, it is also a central ethos of all the civilizations of East Asia. In this course we will read from key books of the Confucian tradition, from its origins with Confucius孔子 (551-479 BC) to the Tang dynasty 唐 (618-907) – 論語, 孟子, 荀子, 大序/詩經, 大學, 中庸, 杜甫, 白居易, 韓愈. Primary readings will be in classical Chinese, with secondary materials in English.
NOTES    Open to graduate students, may also be taken as second semester pre-modern Chinese for Chinese major
PREREQUISITES    Chinese 450 or equivalent
CREDITS    3


Chinese 597E: Student Teacher Middle and High School 

For graduate students working toward teaching certification only.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    Teacher Licensure Program enrollment
CREDITS    3


Chinese 597F: Chinese Political Philosophy 

Conventional wisdom holds that China and greater East Asia together constitute a Confucian civilization. One recent commentator even referred to North Korea as a Confucian society. In this course we will explore the non-Confucian roots of Chinese political philosophy, the strains of thought that brought forth the full articulation of philosophies of war, diplomacy and authoritarian political rule. These philosophies, though seldom studied, have been for centuries at the very core of Chinese political life, every bit as strong in practice and in thought as the Confucian tradition, and remain so today. We will read important excerpts from key books such as左傳, 孫子兵法, 商君書, and 韓非子, in an effort to attain a more realistic and nuanced view of the Chinese political tradition than that which often shapes our perceptions.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    Chinese 450 or equivalent
CREDITS    3


Chinese 597K: Buddhist and Taoist Literature 

In this course we will read some of the greatest literature in the Chinese tradition, Buddhist and Taoist literature, much of which has spread throughout Korea and Japan, and has become increasingly recognized as profound contributions to the history of world literature. First we will explore the classics of the Taoist tradition, philosophers such as Laozi老子, Zhuangzi莊子, and Liezi列子, poets such as Tao Qian陶潛 and Li Bai李白, and the eccentric Seven Sages of the Bamboo Grove竹林七賢. Then, we will turn to the classics of Buddhist literature. We will start with passages from crucial sutras (sacred and philosophical writings that convey the teachings of the Buddha) – the Heart Sutra心經, the Lotus Sutra蓮花經, and the Chan/Zen禪宗 Platform Sutra六祖壇經, and the teachings of Linji/Rinzai臨済 – and move on to poets such as Xie Lingyun謝靈運, Wang Wei王維 and Hanshan/Kanzan寒山 (Cold Mountain).
NOTES    This course may be taken as the second semester of pre-modern Chinese required for the Chinese Major
PREREQUISITES    Chinese 450 or equivalent
CREDITS    3


Chinese 597L: Modern Chinese Literature and Culture

This course offers an advanced survey of Chinese literature and culture from the beginning of the 20th century until today. It covers various genres including essays, short stories, novellas, novels, plays, and film from Mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and the overseas Chinese community. We will examine various literary trends and cultural movements, such as revolutionary, romantic, modernist, feminist, avant-garde, nativist, popular, and rewriting classics. Major themes include the relationship between modern Chinese literature and the world, tradition and modernity, aesthetics and politics, gender issues, writing and geopolitics, production, censorship, and circulation of literature and culture. The readings will be in both Chinese and English.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    None
CREDITS    3


Chinese 597M: The Ming-Qing Novel I 

This course introduces the major works of traditional Chinese fiction, including Romance of the Three Kingdoms, Water Margin, and Dream of the Red Chamber. We will engage in close readings of these great novels, while paying attention to issues such as the representation of history, gender relations, changes in conceptions of desire, religious and philosophical beliefs, and the characterization of heroes and anti‐heroes, among others.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    None
CREDITS    3


Chinese 597P: Traditional Chinese Drama and Performing Arts 

This course introduces the major aspects of Chinese theater from its origins in early Chinese history to the present.  Through a survey of traditional opera and storytelling, this course aims to explore both the artistic values intrinsic to the Chinese theatrical tradition and the social values or forces related to this tradition.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    None
CREDITS    3


Chinese 597Q: The Ming-Qing Novel II 

This course focuses on a masterpiece of traditional Chinese fiction written in the Qing dynasty (1644-1911)—The Dream of the Red Chamber (Honglou meng; also known as The Story of the Stone) by Cao Xueqin (ca.1715-1763). We will engage in close reading of the first eighty chapters of this vernacular novel, while paying attention to issues such as the characterization of heroes and heroines, religious and philosophical beliefs, and the portrayal of gender relations, among others. In order to explore the complexity and richness of this novel, we will also discuss the major social and cultural developments during this period.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    None
CREDITS    3


Chinese 670: Introduction to Research Chinese Source Materials 

Introduction to basic research tools necessary for the study of Chinese primary sources, including dictionaries, biographical and geographical references, indices, bibliographies, calendars, etc. Includes philological problems and exercises in use of source materials.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    Chinese 450
CREDITS    4


Chinese 691A: Graduate Seminar 

The purpose of this course is to provide a framework for thinking about methods of research in various academic areas of Chinese. Students are required to present in the style of academic conference talks. The course follows a seminar format, which means that it is based mostly on class discussion and student presentations rather than lectures. The presentations should be based on the papers from academic journals and directly or potentially related to their thesis topic. It is required that by the end of the semester a clear idea for the topic of your thesis will be developed, and a tentative research outline must be submitted.
NOTES    Open to Graduate students only
PREREQUISITES    Permission of instructor
CREDITS    3


 

Japanese 110: Non-Intensive Elementary Japanese 

Beginning non-intensive course in modern standard Japanese. Students will develop basic skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing. Textbook: Genki I (Lessons 1-4).
NOTES    Offered in Spring semester only. Equivalent to the first half of Japanese 126 in content
PREREQUISITES    None
CREDITS    3


Japanese 120: Non-Intensive Elementary Japanese II

A continuation of Japanese 110. Beginning non-intensive course in modern standard Japanese. Students will develop basic skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing. Textbook: Genki I (Lessons 5-8).
NOTES    Offered in Fall semester only. Equivalent to the second half of Japanese 126 in content
PREREQUISITES    Japanese 110
CREDITS    3


Japanese 126: Intensive Elementary Japanese I 

Beginning intensive course in modern standard Japanese. Students will develop basic skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing. Textbook: Genki I (Lessons 1-8).
NOTES    Offered in Fall semester only
PREREQUISITES    None (*students who completed Japanese 110 with grade of C or better are not eligible to take this course)
CREDITS    6


Japanese 135: Japanese Arts and Culture 

In this lecture course, students are introduced to the secular and religious arts and culture of Japan. We explore the cultural fabric of Japan from the ancient to the modern world, the writings of early aristocratic women and the male oral tradition of the great warrior epics. Samurai culture formed a close symbiosis with Noh theater, and the Zen-inspired arts of the tea ceremony and landscape gardening influenced the politics and religions of a country ravaged by civil wars. After 1600 the rising merchant class created artistic forms that appealed to the people in the centuries of enforced peace. Although modern Japan under Western influence modified its traditions andredefined its views on sexuality, it continued to demonstrate its culturally distinct points of intersection between anthropology and religion, art and architecture, history, politics, and literature.
NOTES    Gen-Ed I/G Course; Check Moodle for listing of required texts
PREREQUISITES    None
CREDITS    4


Japanese 142: Survey of Pre-Modern Japanese Literature in Translation up to 1600

This is a lower-level lecture course (with some discussion) that surveys the important works of literature as well as the authors (if we know them) who wrote this literature between the years 712 and 1600. It will also provide information about genres of literature and historical/cultural background to the works we read. As a survey course, it is by definition broad in scope and shallow in depth, but it should provide the student with a good overview of what the Japanese regard as the most significant works of pre-modern literature before the Tokugawa Period. Requirements: attendance, two exams, periodic quizzes, and two five-page papers.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    None
CREDITS    4


Japanese 143: Classical and Medieval Literature

Japanese 143 is a lecture survey course with as much time as possible devoted to discussion. Students will read, in English translation, the supreme masterpiece of Japanese literature, The Tale of Genji (ca. 1010), which is also the world's first novel and the only world classic written by a woman. Startlingly different from Murasaki Shikibu's subtle romance about the elegant Heian court is The Tale of the Heike, a warrior epic inspired by the political intrigues and the horrors of the Genpei War (1180-1185). This second monumental work of Japanese literature was first transmitted orally by blind itinerant monks who recited episodes pitching the rise of a samurai honor culture against the fall of courtly society to the percussive sound of the lute-like biwa. The Tale of the Heike (compiled in 1371) belongs, like Homer's Iliad, to a male oral tradition. Students are encouraged to link humanistic, aesthetic, and religious values to literary expression, visual culture, and cultural transformation. Class participation (depending on class size) and four quizzes; three papers.
NOTES    Gen-Ed AL/G course
PREREQUISITES    None
CREDITS    4


Japanese 144: Japanese Literature—1600-1945 

Survey of the literature of modern Japan from the first flowering of urban culture in the early 17th century to the “internationalized” writings of the mid-20th century. The course emphasizes reading and discussion of selected works (all in English) chosen for their accessibility as well as their position in the Japanese literary canon. Thematically, special attention is paid to the development of fiction and narrative out of the predominately poetic tradition. We also consider the effect on literature of the tremendous cultural upheaval brought about by the establishment of a modern “Westernized” state in Japan in the late 19th century.
NOTES    Gen-Ed AL/G course
PREREQUISITES    None
CREDITS    4


Japanese 197C: Introduction to Japanese Religions 

In this course, students will survey the basic features of various religious traditions that exist in Japan while specifically examining the issues of nyonin kinsei (exclusion of women from religious space) and of multifacetedness of Buddhism in order to develop awareness about how religion could differ from culture to culture and how big an influence history could have on a religion. In so doing, the course is designed to let students come to a renewed understanding of their own religious traditions and establish a constructive guiding principle for that time when they encounter traditions of other peoples.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    None
CREDITS    3


Japanese 197G: Buddhist Cultures in the World

In this course, students will first examine some of the basic teachings of Buddhism and then look at how Buddhism has been practiced in Tibet, Cambodia, Japan, and the US. As such, the course is also designed to promote logical thinking and broader perspectives. During the first half when we try to understand the basic teachings of this analytical religion, we will be mindful of how logic works. As we examine different Buddhist cultures in the latter half, we will focus on the differences in the cultural contexts on the one hand and the universal human needs that penetrate them on the other.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    None
CREDITS    3


Japanese 197K: Postwar Japanese Literature

Contact instructor for course description.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    None
CREDITS    3


Japanese 197L: Manga/Anime 

After antagonizing much of the rest of the world in World War II, and then waging a struggle for economic supremacy in the 1980’s, Japan now finds itself in the curious position of being a phenomenally successful exporter of pop-culture.  The face of this wave of cultural exports has been manga (cartoons, comic books, and graphic novels) and anime (animation).  This course has three fundamental aims.  First, to give students tools to understand manga and anime on their own terms.   Second, to investigate the role manga and anime play in Japan.  Third, to examine the ways that manga and anime flow from one place to another and see what assumptions control or constrain that flow.  To that end, we will examine manga and anime in their various forms such as newspaper comics, serialized graphic novels, made-for-television animation, OVA (original video animation), and feature length cinematic animation.   
NOTES    Course conducted entirely in English
PREREQUISITES    None
CREDITS    3


Japanese 197M: Study Abroad in Japan 

This course is intended to help prepare students in the Japanese major and minor for the challenges of studying as an exchange (language) student in Japan. In addition to exploring the role and significance of US-Japan exchange students in Japanese and New England history this course guides students in the application process for exchange programs available to UMass Amherst undergraduates through the International Programs Office.  *Priority is given to students who are committed to applying to study abroad in the coming academic year (including summer study abroad).  
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    None
CREDITS    1


Japanese 197N: Asian Homosexualities in Film and Literature

Asian Homosexualities in Film and Literature is a cross-cultural, trans-historical course that explores conceptions and representations of homosexuality in literature and film throughout Asia. The majority of readings and films will be about male same-sex representations, but the availability of literary works and films about the female same-sex experience is growing and the instructor is dedicated to providing as many as can he to the students. There will be quizzes, one midterm, several film response papers, two 5-7 page papers, and a final exam. The students do not have to speak any of the languages of the countries we will be discussing. All the readings are in English. Students will not be asked to write foreign names, titles, genres etc., but they will be expected to recognize them.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    None
CREDITS    3


Japanese 235: Performing Arts of Japan

Japan boasts a phenomenal variety of dramatic arts.  They range from the harvest and religious rituals still performed today to extremely experimental contemporary dance and theater forms.  This course adopts a two-pronged approach.  We will read and analyze examples from each of these dramatic forms, and we will also pay attention to the conventions and craft involved in the staging of these performances.  Thus while we will be attentive to the literary and social impact of the theater forms, we will also locate these theater forms in their historical settings and attempt to get a feel for the various techniques involved in the actual productions.  We will have numerous chances to appreciate these forms of theater through audio-visual materials.  
NOTES    Gen-Ed AT/G course
PREREQUISITES    None
CREDITS    3


Japanese 246: Intensive Elementary Japanese II 

A continuation of Japanese 120 and 126. Students will further develop basic skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing with an emphasis on the practical use of the Japanese language in various contexts. Textbook: Genki I (Lessons 9-12) & Genki II (Lessons 13-16).
NOTES    Offered in Spring semester only
PREREQUISITES    Japanese 120 or 126
CREDITS    6


Japanese 285: Language Suite Conversation 

The Thatcher Japanese Language House offers the opportunity to live in a residence hall dedicated to learning and exploring foreign cultures. Participants live together on a floor which includes a classroom/lounge, where they can socialize in the language. Also, they meet regularly during the week for a specially‐designed, two credit conversation/culture course.  To qualify for the Japanese Language Program, you must have some proficiency in Japanese and a willingness to become more fluent. You must make a year’s commitment to the program; enroll in a 2 credit conversation/culture course each semester, taught on the floor; enroll concurrently in a 3‐credit departmental course; speak the language as much as possible on the floor.
NOTES    Email rap@acad.umass.edu for an application
PREREQUISITES    Thatcher Language Program enrollment
CREDITS    2


Japanese 297B: Japanese Pop-Culture

Taking the perspective that we are all fans, this course explores the nature of fandom and the fan’s role in the production and consumption of popular culture.  We learn to critique and the problems of popular culture. Next we explore what fans look for in popular culture and then explore different popular genres in Japan, including music, movies, manga, and of course, Pokémon and Godzilla.  We end the course by investigating the phenomenon of character goods and what makes them so popular.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    None
CREDITS    3


Japanese 297G: Extensive Japanese Reading I

Students choose from a wide selection of Japanese books in the East Asian Collection and read at their own pace.  The important part of extensive reading is to choose a book where you understand 90% - 95% of the content.  In doing so, you can guess the meaning of a new vocabulary word based on the surrounding context without using a dictionary. Available texts cover a wide variety of genres and contain culturally relevant aspects of Japanese history and society to supplement materials studied in other courses.  Students read authentic texts while gradually improving their reading comprehension, creating book reports and a final presentation based on texts read.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    Japanese 110/126, or permission of the instructor
CREDITS    1


Japanese 297K: Beginning Kanji

A thinker's guide to the Japanese script system (kana, kanji, and more). Covers history, orthography, analysis, and practical use, including tailored kanji-learning strategies for beginners and beyond.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    Successful completion of Japanese 120/126, or permission of instructor
CREDITS    2


Japanese 326: Intensive Intermediate Japanese I 

A continuation of Japanese 246. Students will further develop skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing at an intermediate level with an emphasis on natural communication in various contexts. Textbook: Genki II (Lessons 17-23).
NOTES    Offered in Fall semester only
PREREQUISITES    Japanese 246
CREDITS    6


Japanese 327: Intensive Intermediate Japanese II 

A continuation of Japanese 326. Students will further develop skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing at an intermediate level with an emphasis on natural communication in various contexts and discussion of cultural and contemporary issues. Textbook: Tobira.
NOTES    Offered in Spring semester only
PREREQUISITES    Japanese 326
CREDITS    6


Japanese 375: Introduction to Japanese Linguistics 

Introduction to the nature of Japanese phonology, semantics, syntax, and pragmatics. Following a brief survey of basic linguistic concepts, the course focuses on the structure of modern Japanese, comparative linguistics, Japanese language acquisition, and controversial issues in Japanese linguistics.
NOTES    Linguistics 101 or 401 may be taken concurrently
PREREQUISITES    Japanese 326 (grade of ‘C’ or better)
CREDITS    3


Japanese 391G: Junior-Year Writing 

All undergraduates are required by the University to complete a course in their major for the Junior Year Writing program in order to graduate. The principal thrust of the course will be toward the development of the student's skill in writing English academic and analytical prose, as well as the research that accompanies this writing.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    Successful completion of University's College Writing (CW) requirements (English 112 or 113)
CREDITS    3


Japanese 391M: Queer Japan in Literature and Culture

"Queer Japan in Literature and Culture" is an upper‐level seminar that will meet one day a week for three hours and explore same‐sex desire and love in Japan from the Heian period to the present. Not only will we read queer literature from all periods of Japanese history, but we will also read secondary literature about queer theory and same‐sex desire, some of which has been written in the West about the West and some of which is specifically about Japan.  Much of what we do will be guided by the interests of the students, but we will read some fundamental texts as well that will help shape our discussions of what queer theory/literature/culture is.  The responsibilities of the students will be weekly presentations on the readings, written summaries of outside material not specifically assigned for the course, a strong desire to talk about and discuss Japanese queer culture, and a final paper project of 15 pages for undergraduates and 25 pages for graduate students.  
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    Enrollment by permission of instructor only
CREDITS    3


Japanese 391S: Women Writers in Japan 

Although Japan was famous for its thriving female literary culture during the Heian era (794‐1185), the centuries that followed were ones in which women authors appear to have played a minor role. It was not until the Meiji Restoration in 1868, with its emphasis upon new and “modern” cultural attitudes and norms, that women became a more significant presence on the Japanese literary scene. In this course, we will explore a number of works from this modern revival of Japanese women’s writing, identify themes that these women explore, the genres to which they contribute, and interrogate the notion of “women’s literature” itself to see how the term has been used (or abused) in the Japanese academy.  
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    Section open to undergraduates only
CREDITS    3


Japanese 391T: Tokyo Through Literature and Film

In this course we will explore the transformation of Tokyo from Edo into one of the most vibrant, cosmopolitan cities of the world.  Taking the themes of maps, disaster, and rebirth, and the role of space in identity formation, we will look at how the city has been transformed and reborn. Our materials will include film, photos, literature, and history in order to delve into the nooks and crannies of the city and the city spaces.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    None
CREDITS    3


Japanese 392M: Buddhism and the Japanese Literary Arts 

This course is an investigation into the meeting of two worlds: Buddhist culture from the continent and the literary culture of the Japanese court and monasteries. After spending one week on an overview of Buddhism before Japan, we will turn to how this ‘new’ religion interacted with the elegant culture of the capital as well as how it was expressed by those who practiced its doctrines. The class will meet once a week and will demand significant student participation/discussion. The reading load is substantial. You will be expected to write two papers for the course.
NOTES    Some knowledge of either Buddhism or Japan is highly recommended
PREREQUISITES    None
CREDITS    3


Japanese 393A: Heian Literary Culture 

In “Heian Literary Culture” we will go beyond The Tale of Genji to look closely at a number of other Heian period literary works (all in English translation) that are sometimes skimmed over in survey courses. We also ground our view of this literature in the culture and history of the period, looking at recent scholarly studies for secondary readings. It is strongly recommended that students have a general knowledge of the Heian period before they register for this course. Please contact the instructor for a suggested reading list.
NOTES    Graduate section 593A
PREREQUISITES    None
CREDITS    3


Japanese 397D: Medieval Japanese Literature in Translation

The topic of this upper-level, seminar-style course is literature written in Japan during its years of military rule and warfare from 1185 to the 1570’s (Kamakura and Muromachi periods).  The four hundred years this course covers are marked by an aesthetic (largely Buddhist) that differs in important respects from that found in Japan’s ancient and classical periods (710-1185).  We will read primary texts in the following genres: gunki monogatari (war tales), waka and renga poetry, poetic treatises (karon), memoirs and diaries (nikki), and theatrical plays (Noh).  We will also read some secondary scholarship by Western scholars.  Requirements: two (maybe three) papers, weekly quizzes (to test your knowledge of the readings), and student presentations.  The primary mode of discourse in the class will be discussions; lectures will be minimal.
NOTES    Graduate section 597D
PREREQUISITES    None
CREDITS    3


Japanese 397E: Japan Through its Afflictions

In this course we will consider Japan through its illnesses and explore how Japan modernized by looking the diseases that preoccupied the government and the medical establishment. Additionally, we will explore how representations of medicine and illness have changed as Japan has modernized. One can chart Japan’s rapidly modernization through its illnesses and health concerns. Positioned spatially and intellectually between the two systems of scientific thought, China and the West, Japan has taken from both traditions as it has moved forward historically. This appropriation and assimilation of two major epistemological traditions were manifested in changes in how Japan looked at medicine, the body, and illness. In order to ground our exploration, modernization has to be broadly construed, not as beginning in 1868 when Japan opened up to the West after the arrival of Admiral Perry and his Black Ships as is commonly assumed, but by looking at the beginning of the Tokugawa Period (1603-1868) when Japan was closed to all Western countries but the Dutch. During this time, contact was limited to trade and the acquisition of technological, scientific, and medical information. In particular, medication information was disseminated across Japan and had an impact on doctors, particularly in fields such as obstetrics.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    None
CREDITS    3


Japanese 397K: Intermediate Kanji

A thinker's guide to the Japanese script system (kana, kanji, and more). Covers history, orthography, analysis, and practical use, including tailored kanji-learning strategies for intermediate and advanced readers writers.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    Successful completion of Japanese 326, or permission of instructor
CREDITS    2


Japanese 397P: Modern Japanese Poetry

This course covers major works in modern Japanese lyric poetry, beginning with the earliest Meiji-era long-form poems and ending with Wago Ryoichi's poems on the disasters of March 11, 2011.  We will pair the poems with critical essays that highlight crucial issues in modern poetics.  All readings are available in English, although graduate students will have the opportunity to engage with the poems in the original.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    None
CREDITS    3


Japanese 397R: Gift-Giving in Japan

Gift Giving is, and always has been, very important to Japanese society. This course will explore how gift giving works and how it has changed over time to give us a dynamic and holistic picture of Japanese society. Taught in English.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    None
CREDITS    3


Japanese 492C: Edo Pictorial Fiction

This course introduces students at the high intermediate level of Japanese and beyond to premodern texts and script, with a focus on pictorial texts of the Edo era (1600-1867). Topics include visual culture and popular literature; the course covers the basics of classical grammar and hentaigana using a wide range of authentic texts. Translations and secondary readings are in English.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    None
CREDITS    3


Japanese 494RI: Communicating in Japanese

This course is designed to help students become effective communicators in Japanese. The course uses the Team Based Learning format, meaning that students will do activities in teams. The first part of the course focuses on two key Japanese social concepts that have had extensive impact on communication: the uchi (inside)/soto (outside) distinction and the hierarchical order. In the second part of the course, we will look at two topics concerning Japanese culture/gender roles and the view of nature and compare them to the American context in an attempt to deepen our understanding of both cultures. In the third and last part of the course, we will think of ways for us to support healthy relationships between Japan and the U.S. Use of English is allowed only in the first part.  
NOTES    Satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-Japan majors
PREREQUISITES    Japanese 497A and 497B
CREDITS    3


Japanese 494SI: Shinbun: Newspapers as Modern Culture

Since the late 19th century newspapers have been a vital element in the shaping and dissemination of culture as well as news. Mass media in Japan are now entering a new phase shaped by the internet and attendant technologies. Major topics will include: technology transfer and its impact on culture; the role of mass media in script and education reform; nationalism, latent and overt; censorship and political involvement; the newspaper novel; coverage of sports and celebrities; reader presence on newspaper pages; the cultural and economic role of the newspaper publisher; and the debate about the place of print media in the internet era. We will also pay attention to comparative aspects, reading coverage of historic and contemporary events and topics in U.S. newspapers as well.
NOTES    Satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-Japan majors
PREREQUISITES    Japanese 497A and 497B
CREDITS    3


Japanese 497A: Readings in Modern Japanese I

Readings in Japanese from a variety of contemporary sources, including short fiction, plays, newspapers, magazines and electronic media. This course will focus on readings for comprehension with attention to the  acquisition of greater kanji and vocabulary recognition skills, mastery of grammatical structures of written Japanese, and the development of familiarity with Japanese cultural concepts.
NOTES    Offered in Fall semester only
PREREQUISITES    Japanese 327
CREDITS    3


Japanese 497B: Contemporary Japanese I 

This non‐intensive third year course continues from Japanese 327: Intensive Intermediate II leading to completion of textbook‐centered coursework and preparing students for working exclusively with authentic materials. Strong emphasis on oral proficiency and development of compositional skills, with attention also on increasing kanji recognition and production.
NOTES    Offered in Fall semester only. Discussion primarily in Japanese
PREREQUISITES    Japanese 327
CREDITS    3


Japanese 497C: Readings in Modern Japanese II

Longer readings from a selection of authentic modern Japanese literary materials, essays, and newspaper articles; also integrating readings from textbook covered in Japanese 497D. Emphasis continues from Japanese 497A on reading comprehension, kanji acquisition, and development of independence in grammatical and lexical analysis.
NOTES    Offered in Spring semester only
PREREQUISITES    Japanese 497A, or permission of instructor
CREDITS    3


Japanese 497D: Contemporary Japanese II 

A continuation of Japanese 497B. Students will further develop skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing at an intermediate-high level with an emphasis on natural communication in various contexts and discussion on cultural and contemporary issues. Further emphasis on oral fluency and development of compositional skills. Preparing students for working exclusively with authentic materials.
NOTES    Offered in Spring semester only. Instruction and discussion in Japanese
PREREQUISITES    Japanese 497B
CREDITS    3


Japanese 497G: Extensive Japanese Reading II

Students choose from a wide selection of Japanese books in the East Asian Collection and read at their own pace.  The important part of extensive reading is to choose a book where you understand 90% - 95% of the content.  In doing so, you can guess the meaning of a new vocabulary word based on the surrounding context without using a dictionary. Available texts cover a wide variety of genres and contain culturally relevant aspects of Japanese history and society to supplement materials studied in other courses. Students read authentic texts while gradually improving their reading comprehension, creating book reports and a final presentation based on texts read.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    Japanese 397, or permission of the instructor
CREDITS    1


Japanese 498T: Tutorial and Practicum

Non-native advanced students or native speakers of Japanese are assigned to work with one of the faculty and assist in teaching beginning or intermediate Japanese.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    Department consent required
CREDITS    1+


Japanese 498Y: Practicum 

Contact instructor for course description.
NOTES    Honors Colloquium is available
PREREQUISITES    Department consent required
CREDITS    1+


Japanese 499C: Honors Thesis Seminar—The Samurai

The honors thesis seminar explores the unique culture of the samurai warrior class from its ancient origins to its transformation under the Tokugawa regime and its demise in modern times. To the West, the enigma of Japan emerges from the samurai honor code the combines seemingly incompatible practices like Zen training and ritual suicide. How could a warrior class exist through a peace by practicing, philosophically, the Way of the Sword? In addition to aspects of samurai warfare and the philosophy of death, we will also study the samurai way of love. Among the primary and secondary material will be samurai legends and tales, the theater of war, and eight samurai films.

The Samurai is a 4-credit seminar open to senior honors students (junior honors students with special permission of the instructor), and can be taken by students in Chinese program as well. It is the first part of a two‐semester 8‐credit honors thesis seminar. Preference in registration is given to Commonwealth Honors College seniors using this course toward their honors thesis requirement; others as space permits.
NOTES    Senior students enroll via SPIRE; juniors require permission of instructor
PREREQUISITES    Honors students only
CREDITS    4


Japanese 499D: Honors Thesis Seminar—Rebels & Martyrs

This is the second half of the yearlong honors thesis seminar JAPANESE 499C/D. For a description of the first half, see under JAPANESE 499C. The spring half of the honors thesis seminar addresses issues of rebellion and martyrdom in Premodern and Modern Japan under the rubric of “sacrifice.” We will analyze primary and secondary literature as well as films on a variety of topics. For Premodern Japan, we will focus on human sacrifices in Noh drama, rebels following the Way of Tea, Japanese Christian martyrs, blood avengers, children as rebels and martyrs, peasant rebels, social rebels committing double suicide, and common folk calling the shots through religious world-renewal movements. For Modern Japan, we will explore the motivations of assassins in the late Tokugawa (Bakumatsu) and Meiji periods, of rebels in 20th-century feminist and proletarian movements, and of soldiers in the Pacific War.
NOTES    Fulfills the IE (Integrative Experience) requirement
PREREQUISITES    None
CREDITS    4


Japanese 532: Media Japanese I 

The course is designed to improve reading and listening comprehension through the use of authentic materials in Japanese media including blogs, newspapers (print and web), television news and magazine programs, and movies reflecting life and thought in contemporary Japan. In particular we will concentrate on journalistic or newspaper Japanese, paying attention to stylistic habits and conventions of the genre.
NOTES    Students returning from study abroad should contact the instructor
PREREQUISITES    Japanese 497C or equivalent
CREDITS    3


Japanese 536: Advanced Modern Japanese I 

Conducted entirely in Japanese. This course is designed to help students reach the level of Japanese where they can use it to have constructive interactions with Japanese people as it prompts them to look back at their college life and to prepare themselves for what’s to come. While all four skills will be strengthened, the emphasis is slightly more on listening and speaking. The course uses authentic materials including web posts, recorded conversations, TV dramas, and academic articles.
NOTES    Offered in Fall semester only
PREREQUISITES    Japanese 497D
CREDITS    3


Japanese 537: Advanced Modern Japanese II 

A continuation of Japanese 532 and 536. Students will further develop skills in reading and analyzing quality Japanese texts, listening to conversations and debates, and expressing opinions clearly and logically in writing and in verbal discussions. As such, this course is designed to help students gain proficiency in academic situations.
NOTES    Offered in Spring semester only
PREREQUISITES    Japanese 532/536
CREDITS    3


Japanese 556: Introduction to Classical Japanese I 

Introduction to the literary language of Japanese through the study of classical grammar and the linguistic analysis of poetry and prose.
NOTES    Open to regular & honors students; can be taken in parallel with Japanese 597A: Manuscript Japanese
PREREQUISITES    Japanese 497A and 497B
CREDITS    3


Japanese 556H: Classical Japanese I

Introduction to the literary language of Japanese through the study of classical grammar (bungotai 文語体) and the linguistic analysis of classical poetry and prose texts.
NOTES    Open to regular & honors students; can be taken in parallel with Japanese 597A: Manuscript Japanese
PREREQUISITES    Japanese 497A or consent of the instructor
CREDITS    3


Japanese 557: Introduction to Classical Japanese II 

Critical reading and appreciation of selected major masterpieces in cultural and literary contexts; improving grammar and dictionary skills.
NOTES    Students must enroll in Japanese 597A: Manuscript Japanese
PREREQUISITES    Japanese 556 or permission of the instructor
CREDITS    3


Japanese 557H: Classical Japanese II

A continuation of Japanese 556H. Critical reading and appreciation of selected major classical texts (poetry and prose) in their cultural and literary context. Focus on improving grammar and dictionary skills, as well as introducing basic philological research.
NOTES    Open to regular & honors students; can be taken in parallel with Japanese 597A: Manuscript Japanese
PREREQUISITES    Japanese 556H or permission of the instructor
CREDITS    3


Japanese 570: Introduction to Japanese Reference and Bibliography 

Introduction to Japanese resources available through general reference works, bibliographies, specialized reference materials, and the Internet.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    Japanese 497C or permission of the instructor
CREDITS    3


Japanese 580: Teaching Japanese as a Foreign Language 

Seminar on the theoretical and practical approaches to foreign language learning and teaching. Topics include second language acquisition theory, psycholinguistics in L2 acquisition, Japanese teaching methodology, syllabus design, lesson planning, materials development, testing and assessment, and teacher development.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    Permission of instructor
CREDITS    3


Japanese 591B: Seminar in Modern Japanese Philosophy 

This offering will focus on the development of philosophy in modern Japan.  Concentration will be on some of the major figures of the late 19th and 20th centuries and how they conceived of philosophy in contexts of war, in the ebb and flow of national sensitivities, and in relationship to the West will be major themes.  How such philosophy grappled with the questions of “Japanese-ness,” while important here, will not overshadow the fact that philosophers were at the same time trying to cope with major questions about human existence, death, justice, and the ethical dilemmas of modern society.  Reading will be from translated primary sources and from related works.  Efforts will be made to relate much of this material to contemporary social and ethical problems – thus, it is hoped, showing how the thinking of these modern Japanese may have value and importance even for students with academic and long-term interests not specifically linked to the study of Japan.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    None
CREDITS    3


Japanese 591M: Queer Japan in Literature and Culture 

See Japanese 394M for course description.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    For graduate students only; enrollment by instructor consent
CREDITS    3


Japanese 591S: Japanese Women's Literature

See Japanese 391S for course description.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    For graduate students only
CREDITS    3


Japanese 591T: Tokyo Through Literature and Film

See Japanese 391T for course description.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    For graduate students only
CREDITS    3


Japanese 592: Pro-Seminars Graduate Faculty

Various proseminars are offered by faculty as a requirement for the Master’s degree in Japanese, sometimes in parallel with existing undergraduate courses.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    For graduate students only
CREDITS    3


Japanese 593A: Heian Literary Culture

See Japanese 393A for course description.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    For graduate students only
CREDITS    3


Japanese 593B: Introduction to Japanese Linguistics 

See Japanese 375 for course description.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    For graduate students only
CREDITS    3


Japanese 597A: Manuscript Japanese

Designed as a critical supplement to the study of bungotai, this course introduces the script forms and orthography that most Japanese texts—whether manuscript, woodblock printed or moveable type—used prior to the twentieth century. Students will become familiar with the basic elements of that script system, from derivation and method to deciphering letters (fall semester) and reading complete texts (spring semester).
NOTES    Repeatable course, may be taken in conjunction with both Japanese 556H and Japanese 557H
PREREQUISITES    Japanese 556 or knowledge of classical grammar
CREDITS    1


Japanese 597C: Problems and Methods in Translation 

Advanced training in practical techniques associated with the translation of modern Japanese; familiarization with appropriate glossaries, dictionaries, and other translator’s tools. Discussion of specific problems in Japanese-English translation and practice with a variety of prose styles used in journalistic, political, commercial, literary and other forms of modern writing.
NOTES    For undergraduate students only; graduate companion course Japanese 660
PREREQUISITES    Consent of the instructor
CREDITS    3


Japanese 597D: Medieval Japanese Literature in Translation

See Japanese 397D for course description.
NOTES    Graduate companion course
PREREQUISITES    Consent of the instructor
CREDITS    3


Japanese 597F: Business Japanese

The goal of the course is to aid students in being familiar and comfortable with the language, culture, and topics used in Japanese business. The course covers a wide range of topics including technology, science, economy, bioethics, and multinational companies as related to Japanese industry. Class activities include listening to talks, group discussion, debate, and presentations to improve language skills. The class is conducted entirely in Japanese.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    Japanese 497B, or equivalent
CREDITS    3


Japanese 660: Problems and Methods in Translation 

See Japanese 597C for course description. 
NOTES    For graduate students only
PREREQUISITES    Consent of the instructor
CREDITS    3


Japanese 691A: Graduate Seminar 

Discussion of major texts and themes in Japanese literary studies.
NOTES    For first-year graduate students only
PREREQUISITES    Contact instructor for details
CREDITS    3


Japanese 692B: Advanced Thesis Writing

Contact instructor for course description.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    For graduate students only
CREDITS    3


Japanese 697A: Readings in Japanese Theory and Method 

Consult Professor Miller for more information.   
NOTES    For graduate students only
PREREQUISITES    Contact instructor for details
CREDITS    3


 

Asian-St 197B: Beginning Korean

Beginning Korean I is the first half of a two‐semester introductory course in spoken and written Korean for students who do not have any previous knowledge of Korean.  This course is designed to help students acquire fundamental skills to read, write, listen and speak in elementary level Korean. The class will start with learning Hangŭl - the Korean writing system, simple sentence patterns, and basic communication strategies. In addition to the textbook study in classroom, audio-visual materials and activities will be used in class. In accordance with the national standards in foreign language education, all Five Cs (Communication, Cultures, Connections, Comparisons, and Communities) will be emphasized in the course.  
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    None
CREDITS    3


Asian-St 197C: Beginning Korean II

This course is the second part of the Beginning Korean sequence, which is designed to teach the fundamental skills to read, write, listen and speak in elementary level Korean.  Prior to taking this course, students are expected to read Hangul and to be able to talk about simple daily activities and carry a limited conversation with memorized phrases.  Compared to the first semester, more advanced vocabulary and grammar patterns will be introduced, and the students will learn how to integrate them into developed forms of application.  By the end of the course, students will be able to handle a variety of uncomplicated communicative tasks successfully and will be able to ask a few formulaic questions.  In addition to the textbook study in the classroom, audio-visual materials and activities will be used in class.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    Asian-St 197B or permission of the instructor

CREDITS    3


Asian-St 297B: Intermediate Korean I

This course aims at the acquisition of language skills to read, write, listen, and speak in intermediate-level Korean. It is designed for students who have taken Elementary Korean courses or proven to be at the equivalent level by placement test.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    Asian-St 197C or permission of the instructor

CREDITS    3


Asian-St 297C: Intermediate Korean II

This course aims at the acquisition of language skills to read, write, listen, and speak in intermediate-level Korean.  It is designed for students who have taken Intermediate Korean I (Asian-St 297B at UMass, KOR 201 at Smith, or Asian ST 262 at MHC) or proven to be at the equivalent level by the placement test.  In addition to the textbook study in the classroom, audio-visual materials and class activities are employed by the instructor.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    Asian-St 297B or permission of the instructor

CREDITS    3


Asian-St 497C: Korean Languages: Literature

In this course, students will learn advanced level Korean through Korean literature. Students will achieve deeper understanding of Korean culture and society through a lens of literature. Students will read the various genres of literature texts, write reflection journals, and discuss them in class. Assignments will include creative writing, literary translation, book reviews and reflection journals. Developing academic reading and writing skills will be the major learning goal, as well as formal speaking and listening skills. By the end of the course, students will be able to describe, narrate, compare, and report a paragraph level discourse in a coherent manner. Students will also be able to talk about abstract concepts.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    Asian-St 297C or permission of the instructor

CREDITS    3


Asian-St 497E: Advanced Korean: Current Issues in Korea 

This course is designed to improve students’ Korean proficiency through studying news articles. In this course, students will read current news articles, discuss and analyze them in relation to Korea’s social, cultural and historical context. Some of the activities include reading and summarizing news articles, news report presentations, translation of the news articles, and writing an opinion journal. By the end of the course, students will be able to describe, report, narrate, and compare in a paragraph level discourse in a coherent manner. Students will also able to support their opinions and talk about abstract concepts. Students will also gain a deeper understanding of the current Korean society.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    Advanced Korean or equivalent; permission of the instructor

CREDITS    3


Asian-St 497F: Business Korean

This course is intended to help students acquire a broad knowledge of business Korean and relevant Korean business culture. The course aims to develop language skills and general business cultural understanding useful for performing basic business within the Korean business environment. The course focuses on basic business terms, phrases and business etiquette of Korean. We will expand on the grammar acquired in 2nd- and 3rd-year Korean and learn vocabulary useful in business situations. Through task-based and content-oriented activities, you will develop your language and cultural competency in business Korean.
NOTES    Contact instructor for details
PREREQUISITES    Advanced Korean or equivalent; permission of the instructor

CREDITS    3